SECTION General news STORY TAG stalker315ped BY TIPPING, MICHAEL C. DATELINE LOS ANGELES (

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SECTION: General news STORY TAG: stalker:315ped BY: TIPPING, MICHAEL C. DATELINE: LOS ANGELES (UPI) October 04, 1989 TIME: 12:14pd CYCLE: bc PRIORITY: Urgent WORD COUNT: 0638 The jury that convicted Richard Ramirez of 13 Night Stalker murders recommended Wednesday that the devil-worshiping drifter be executed for a series of nocturnal attacks that terrorized Southern California four years ago. Superior Court Judge Michael Tynan can accept or reject the jury's recommendation and will decide Ramirez's fate when he formally sentences him at a later date. The jury of seven women and five men, rejecting defense pleas to spare Ramirez's life, reached its decision shortly after resuming deliberations for a fifth day in the penalty phase of Ramirez's 15-month trial. There are 265 death row inmates in California, including 64 who have had their death sentences upheld on appeals. The last person to be put to death in the state's gas chamber was Sacramento cop-killer Aaron Mitchell, on April 12, 1967. Ramirez, a lanky devil-worshiping drifter from El Paso, Texas, faced only two possible sentences: death in the gas chamber at San Quentin Prison or life behind bars without the possibility of parole. Ramirez, 29, was convicted by the same jury last month of 13 counts of murder plus 30 other counts of burglary, attempted murder, rape, sodomy and forcible oral copulation. He was also convicted of 19 separate special circumstance allegations including multiple murders and murder during a burglary that qualified him for a possible death sentence. Jurors found him guilty of 15 attacks involving 25 victims, 13 of whom were murdered, from June 27, 1984 until Aug. 8, 1985. As Ramirez was led from the courthouse to County Jail following his conviction, he flashed a two-finger "devil's horn" sign and shouted out "evil" to reporters when asked what he thought of the verdict. The charges against Ramirez stem from the Night Stalker serial killing spree that began in 1984 and terrorized Southern California through the summer of 1985, prompting a sharp increase in sales of guns and home alarm systems. In a series of horrific late-night and early-morning attacks, Ramirez broke into darkened homes and attacked his victims while they slept, shooting many of them in the head, bludgeoning or stabbing to death others and slitting one victim's throat from ear to ear. Some of the attacks were tinged with Satanic influences. Ramirez made one of his rape victims swear allegiance to Satan, drew Satanic pentagrams on the body of a murder victim and gouged out the eyes of another. His lawyers, Ray Clark and Daniel Hernandez, presented no witnesses at the penalty phase and Ramirez never took the stand. "He didn't see any need to put his life on display," Clark said. Deputy District Attorney Philip Halpin did not present any witnesses either, preferring to "let the 13 murders speak for themselves." Ramirez was convicted after 22 days of deliberations, a rocky process that was interrupted when one juror was dismissed for sleeping and a second, Phyllis Singletary, was shot to death by her boyfriend, who later committed suicide. Ramirez's killing spree ended when he was beaten and captured by angry citizens in East Los Angeles after trying to steal a woman's car Aug. 31, 1985. He was arrested and has remained in custody ever since. Ramirez still faces charges in San Francisco for a 14th murder and in Orange County for wounding a Mission Viejo man and raping his fiancee. SECTION: General news STORY TAG: stalker:440ped BY: TIPPING, MICHAEL C. DATELINE: LOS ANGELES (UPI) October 04, 1989 TIME: 13:44pd CYCLE: bc PRIORITY: Regular WORD COUNT: 0693 The jury that convicted Richard Ramirez of 13 Night Stalker murders recommended Wednesday that the devil-worshiping drifter be executed in the gas chamber for a series of nocturnal attacks that terrorized Southern California four years ago. The sullen Ramirez listened impassively, rocking in his chair and glaring over his shoulder at spectators in the packed courtroom as the jury's decisions were read. By the end, a "penalty of death" had been repeated 19 times. Relatives of a number of Ramirez's victims sobbed quietly as Superior Court Judge Michael Tynan announced the recommendations, which he can accept or reject. Tynan will make the ultimate decision on Ramirez's fate when he formally sentences him Nov. 7. A death sentence is automatically appealed to the California Supreme Court. The jury of seven women and five men, rejecting defense pleas to spare Ramirez's life, reached its decision shortly after resuming deliberations for a fifth day in the penalty phase of Ramirez's 15-month trial. There are 265 death row inmates in California, including 64 who have had their death sentences upheld on appeals. The last person to be put to death in the state's gas chamber was Sacramento cop-killer Aaron Mitchell, on April 12, 1967. Ramirez, a lanky devil-worshiping drifter from El Paso, Texas, faced only two possible fates: death in the gas chamber at San Quentin Prison or life behind bars without the possibility of parole. Ramirez, 29, was convicted by the same jury last month of 13 counts of murder plus 30 other felonies, including burglary, attempted murder, rape, sodomy and forcible oral copulation. He was also convicted of 19 separate special circumstance allegations including multiple murders and murder during the commission of other crimes that qualified him for the death sentence. Jurors found him guilty of 15 attacks involving 25 victims, 13 of whom were murdered, from June 27, 1984 until Aug. 8, 1985. The charges against Ramirez stem from the Night Stalker serial killing spree that began in 1984 and terrorized Southern California through the summer of 1985, prompting a sharp increase in sales of guns and home alarm systems. In a series of horrific late-night and early-morning attacks, Ramirez broke into darkened homes and attacked his victims while they slept, shooting many of them in the head, bludgeoning or stabbing to death others and slitting one victim's throat from ear to ear. Some of the attacks were tinged with Satanic influences. Ramirez made one of his rape victims swear allegiance to Satan, drew Satanic pentagrams on the body of a murder victim and gouged out the eyes of another. His lawyers, Ray Clark and Daniel Hernandez, presented no witnesses at the penalty phase and Ramirez never took the stand. "He didn't see any need to put his life on display," Clark said. Deputy District Attorney Philip Halpin did not present any witnesses either, preferring to "let the 13 murders speak for themselves." Ramirez was convicted after 22 days of deliberations, a rocky process that was interrupted when one juror was dismissed for sleeping and a second, Phyllis Singletary, was shot to death by her boyfriend, who later committed suicide. Ramirez's killing spree ended when he was beaten and captured by angry citizens in East Los Angeles after trying to steal a woman's car Aug. 31, 1985. He was arrested and has remained in custody ever since. Ramirez still faces charges in San Francisco for a 14th murder and in Orange County for wounding a Mission Viejo man and raping his fiancee. SECTION: General news STORY TAG: stalker:530ped BY: TIPPING, MICHAEL C. DATELINE: LOS ANGELES (UPI) October 04, 1989 TIME: 14:31pd CYCLE: bc PRIORITY: Urgent WORD COUNT: 0840 The jury that convicted Richard Ramirez of 13 Night Stalker murders recommended Wednesday that the devil-worshiping drifter be executed in the gas chamber for a series of nocturnal attacks that terrorized Southern California four years ago. As he was escorted out of the courthouse under guard after hearing the jury's decision, Ramirez said: "Big deal. Death always went with the territory. I'll see you in Disneyland." The sullen Ramirez had listened impassively, rocking in his chair and glaring over his shoulder at spectators in the packed courtroom as the jury's decisions were read. By the end, a "penalty of death" had been repeated 19 times. Relatives of a number of Ramirez's victims sobbed quietly as Superior Court Judge Michael Tynan announced the recommendations, which he can accept or reject. Tynan will make the ultimate decision on Ramirez's fate when he formally sentences him Nov. 7. A death sentence is automatically appealed to the California Supreme Court. The jury of seven women and five men, rejecting defense pleas to spare Ramirez's life, reached its decision shortly after resuming deliberations for a fifth day in the penalty phase of Ramirez's 15-month trial. "I think he got what he deserved," said one juror, Arthur Johnson, 43, a Los Angeles mail carrier. "Maybe Satan will give him his reward." Another juror, Cynthia Haden, 36, a bank administrative assistant from Glendale, said she had suffered nightmares of the gruesome murders. "I'll get over it, but I'll never be the same. We did the right thing." "Our lives will never be the same," said Ellen Francis, whose parents, Maxon and Lela Kneiding, were killed by Ramirez. "How can any human being do anything like that?" Prosecutor Phil Halpin said he was relieved that the marathon case was nearly over. "I am greatly relieved I won't have to tell the survivors (that) we'll have to do it again. This has not been fun at all." Ray Clark, one of Ramirez's three lawyers, said the death verdict was predictable. "I wouldn't take Hitler's life," he said. "I wouldn't want him on the streets, but taking someone's life is a terrible thing." Daniel Hernandez, another defense lawyer, said he was personally saddened by the decision. "I feel very close to Richard Ramirez. He and I are friends." There are 265 death row inmates in California, including 64 whose death sentences have been upheld on appeals. The last person to be put to death in the state's gas chamber was Sacramento cop-killer Aaron Mitchell, on April 12, 1967. Ramirez, a lanky devil-worshiping drifter from El Paso, Texas, faced only two possible fates: death in the gas chamber at San Quentin Prison or life behind bars without the possibility of parole. Ramirez, 29, who never took the stand, was convicted Sept. 20 by the same jury of 13 counts of murder plus 30 other felonies, including burglary, attempted murder, rape, sodomy and forcible oral copulation. He also was convicted of 19 separate special circumstance allegations including multiple murders and murder during the commission of other crimes that qualified him for the death sentence. In all, the jury, after deliberating 22 days, found him guilty of 15 attacks involving 25 victims, 13 of whom were murdered, between June 27, 1984, and Aug. 8, 1985. In a series of late-night and early-morning attacks that prompted a sharp rise in gun and home alarm sales, Ramirez broke into darkened homes and attacked his victims while they slept, shooting many of them in the head, bludgeoning or stabbing to death others and slitting one victim's throat from ear to ear. Some of the attacks were tinged with Satanic influences. Ramirez made one of his rape victims swear allegiance to Satan, drew Satanic pentagrams on the body of a murder victim, and gouged out the eyes of another murder victim. The prosecution won Ramirez's conviction by calling 138 witnesses, including six female survivors of the attacks who identified Ramirez as the Night Stalker. The killings ended when Ramirez was captured and beaten by an angry group of East Los Angeles residents after trying to steal a woman's car on Aug. 31, 1985. Ramirez still faces charges in San Francisco for a 14th murder and in Orange County for allegedly shooting and wounding a Mission Viejo man and raping his fiancee. SECTION: General news STORY TAG: stalker:250aed BY: TIPPING, MICHAEL C. DATELINE: LOS ANGELES (UPI) October 05, 1989 TIME: 23:52pd CYCLE: bc PRIORITY: Regular WORD COUNT: 0873 Four years and a month after the terrifying Night Stalker murder spree ended, Richard Ramirez heard the jury's recommendation that he die in the gas chamber, and defiantly said "... see you in Disneyland." Ramirez, a lanky, devil-worshipping drifter from El Paso, Texas, heard the judge say "death" 19 times Wednesday after the jury that convicted him of 13 Night Stalker murders and 30 other robbery and sex crimes recommended he be executed in the gas chamber for a series of nocturnal attacks that galvanized Southern California with fear. Led in chains to the van that took him from the courthouse, Ramirez said in a husky and chilling voice: "Big deal. Death always went with the territory. I'll see you in Disneyland." Ramirez, dressed all in black, listened impassively, rocking in his chair and glaring over his shoulder at spectators in the packed courtroom as the jury's decisions were read. Relatives of victims sobbed quietly as Superior Court Judge Michael Tynan announced the recommendations, which he can accept or reject when he formally sentences Ramirez Nov. 7. A death sentence is automatically appealed to the California Supreme Court. The jury of seven women and five men, rejecting defense pleas to spare Ramirez's life because "even the devil deserves mercy," reached its decision shortly after resuming deliberations for a fifth day in the penalty phase of Ramirez's 15-month trial. "I think he got what he deserved," said one juror, Arthur Johnson, 43, a Los Angeles mail carrier. "Maybe Satan will give him his reward." Another juror, Cynthia Haden, 36, a bank employee who lives just two blocks from the scene of a double Stalker murder in suburban Glendale, said she has had nightmares since seeing police photographs of the gruesome murders. "I'll get over it, but I'll never be the same. We did the right thing." "Our lives will never be the same," said a tearful Ellen Francis, whose parents were killed by Ramirez. "How can any human being do anything like that?" Prosecutor Phil Halpin said he was relieved that the marathon case was nearly over. "I am greatly relieved I won't have to tell the survivors (that) we'll have to do it again. This has not been fun at all." Ray Clark, one of Ramirez's three lawyers, said the death verdict was predictable. "I wouldn't take Hitler's life," he said. "I wouldn't want him on the streets, but taking someone's life is a terrible thing." Ramirez, 29, faces only two possible sentences: death in the gas chamber at San Quentin Prison or life behind bars without the possibility of parole. Ramirez, who did not testify at either the evidentiary or penalty phase of his trial, was convicted Sept. 20 of 13 counts of murder plus 30 other felonies, including burglary, attempted murder, rape, sodomy and forcible oral copulation. He also was convicted of 19 separate special circumstance allegations including multiple murders and murder during the commission of other crimes that qualified him for the death sentence on each allegation. In all, the jury, after deliberating 22 days, found him guilty of 15 attacks involving 25 victims, 13 of whom were murdered, between June 27, 1984, and Aug. 8, 1985. Ramirez still faces charges in San Francisco for a 14th murder and in Orange County for an attempted murder and rape in Mission Viejo. The Night Stalker's reign of terror was a series of random nocturnal attacks that prompted a sharp rise in gun and home alarm sales. The Stalker broke into darkened homes and attacked his victims while they slept, shooting several husbands in the head, then raping their wives. Other victims were bludgeoned or stabbed. One victim's throat was cut from ear to ear. Some of the attacks were tinged with satanic influences. Ramirez made one of his rape victims swear allegiance to Satan, drew satanic pentagrams on the body of a murder victim, and gouged out the eyes of another murder victim. The prosecution called 138 witnesses, including six female survivors of the attacks who identified Ramirez as the Night Stalker. The killings ended when Ramirez was captured and beaten by an angry group of East Los Angeles residents after trying to steal a car on Aug. 31, 1985. The night before, Ramirez had been named as the Night Stalker suspect from fingerprints identified by the state's new computerized print system, and he was seen looking at a newspaper with his picture on the front page after getting off a bus. At least one psychologist said Ramirez may have taken up murder, rape and robbery as a hobby, and a jailer testified Ramirez told him, "I love to kill people. I love watching people die ... I love all that blood."

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