This document is a listing of publications of alternative news sources. It lists newspaper

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This document is a listing of publications of alternative news sources. It lists newspapers and periodicals from progressive groups and organizations as well as alternative media publications. While this listing is nowhere near complete, it does give one a place to start when looking for an alternative source of information than our "standard" corporate-sponsored, misinformation proned, mass media on which much of our nation relies for its information. These sources are not in any particular order, and please check with the source for current subscription rates as they may have changed since this document was written. You are encouraged to print this and/or pass this document (without deletions) to all. The format of the entries are as follows:

- - ------------------------------------------------------------ CDF Reports 122 C St., NW, 4th Floor Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-8787 12/year - $29.95 Children's Defense Fund - Better social programs for disadvantaged children instead of more money for the Pentagon are advocated in these reports. Whether needing more assistance because they are poor, handicapped or children of color, these children will find a voice in this progressive periodical. Child Care ActioNews 99 Hudson St, #1233 New York, NY 10013 (212) 334-9595 6/year - $20 Child Care Action Campaign - Better quality, expanded day care is promoted in the eight pages of ActioNews. While the short-term goal is improvement of current day care facilities, the final goal is a "national system of quality, affordable child care." News of the World's Children 331 E. 38th St. New York, NY 10016 (212) 686-5522 4/year - Donation US Commission for UNICEF - This is brought to you by the same group that knocks on your door at Halloween for donations to fight children's hunger and disease. It is basically a report to donors on some of the many relief efforts their dollars make possible. Progressive Student News Box 1027 Iowa City, IA 52244 (319) 351-8041 5/year - $6 Progressive Student Network - This networking tool serves to spread ideas and success stories of student organizing around peace and freedom issues. "Study and Struggle" is the Network's slogan. Student Action Box 15599 Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 547-2300 6/year - $10 National Student Action Center - Action and networking for peace, alternative careers and university divestment of holdings in companies doing business in South Africa are some areas promoted. A calendar and resource column round out this tool for student organizing. Students United for Peace Newsletter 630 14th St, #6 Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 447-3696 6/year - $5 Students United For Peace - Nuclear disarmament, Central America and South Africa are three concerns in this inspiring newsletter. Ideas for working on peace around these and other areas are expounded. American Indian Law Newsletter U.N.M. School of Law 1117 Stanford NE Box 4456 Alburquerque, NM 87102 (505) 277-5462 6/year - $20 Marc Mannes, American Indian Law Center - Legislative defense of Native American civil rights is promoted here. Legal strategies and congressional legislation affecting tribes and individual Indians are explained. Black Scholar Box 2869 Oakland, CA 94609 (415) 547-6633 6/year - $25 Robert Chrisman - Anyone interested in the theory and practice of the Black civil rights movement will benefit from this well-written and exciting journal. Writers for the Black Scholar include some of the most struggle-tempered veterans as well as younger activists and intellectuals. Disability Rag Box 145 Louisville, KY 40201 (502) 459-5343 6/year - $9 Advocado Press - Citizens with disabilities will have equal access to all jobs and facilities, if these advocates win their goals. They work for more aids such as wheelchair ramps and against employment discrimination. Our Struggle/Nuestra Lucha 2827 Catania Way Sacramento, CA 95826 (916) 361-9072 4-5/year - $10 Latino Commission, Democratic Socialists of America - Common concerns of the Hispanic rights movement and democratic socialism are conveyed in Our Struggle. Economic democracy, equality and self-determination in the nations south of the border and in the barrios of this country are demanded. Trends in Housing 733 15th St. NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 783-8150 6/year - $18 National Commission Against Discrimination in Housing and Intergroup Corp. - Trends in Housing shows how we can personally help stop housing discrimination. It also suggests national legislation needing support in this end. Left Curve Box 472 Oakland, CA 94604 (415) 763-7193 Irreg. - $15 Csaba Polony - Poetry, reviews and deep cultural analysis on music, theatre and other subjects are published here. Left Curve is among the two or three best quality magazines on people's culture published in the US. Rock & Roll Confidential Dept. RB Box 1073 Maywood, NJ 07607 12/year - $21 Dave Marsh, Rock & Roll Confidential - Rock and roll as an industry whose chief aim is profit is exposed in this irreverent newsletter. Payola, more equitable royalties and behind-the-scenes activities are included. Struggle Box 13261 Detroit, MI 48213 (313) 824-6258 4/year - $6 Tim Hall, Detroit Branch, Marxist-Leninist Party, USA - Workers' culture is the attraction in this incisive literary review. Short stories, poetry, debate on the role of literature in the labor movement and readers' letters combine to make Struggle a literary tool for the workers' control. Mill Hunk Herald 916 Middle St. Pittsburgh, PA 15212 (412) 321-4767 2/year - $5 Larry Evans, Piece of the Hunk Publishers - The Mill Hunk Herald is one of the finest examples of workers' literary magazines in the US. Prose and poetry pieces are interlaced to give a realistic sense of workers' culture. Environmental Action 1525 New Hampshire Ave. NW Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 745-4870 6/year - $20 Rose Audette, Environmental Action - Organizing in the consumers' and citizens' environmental interest is effectively done with the help of this basic periodical. Environmental Action will help people concerned about the quality of their surroundings work for improvement in this area. Greenpeace Magazine 1436 U St, NW Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 462-1177 6/year - $20 Greenpeace USA - Non-violent direct action is a key tactic of Greenpeace in defending human and animal rights at sea and on land. Petitions, rallies and direct interference against nuclear weapons ships and whaling expeditions are some ways this groups fights the good fight. The magazine is slick and well-written, and will probably move you to action on these issues. Journal of Environmental Health 720 S. Colorado Blvd. #970 S. Tower Denver, CO 80222 (303) 756-9090 6/year - $35 National Environmental Health Association - Health professionals may appreciate this scholarly collection of analyses on the environment vis-a-vis the law, new consumer products, wastes, etc. Journal of Pesticide Reform Box 1393 Eugene, OR 97440 (503) 344-5044 4/year - $12 Northwest Coalition for Alt. to Pesticides - Slashing the use of pesticides on crops and using safer chemicals when pesticides are necessary are the objectives. The editor is concerned with both farmworkers and consumers and recommends ways people can have pesticide use cut. Land/LEAF 3368 Oak Ave Stevens Point, WI 54481 (715) 344-6158 4/year - $10 Land Educational Assoc. - Functional and mimeographed, LandLEAF includes a number of environmental articles. Topics in one issue include irradiated foods, no nukes news and mining pollution. Not Man Apart 530 7th St. SE Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 543-4312 6/year - $18 Friends of the Earth - Friends of the Earth is one of the most progressive and effective environmental groups. Both activists and inquisitive citizens will enjoy the mix of action news and information articles. Nuke Watch 315 W. Gorham St. Madison, WI 53703 (608) 256-4146 6/year - Donation Cassandra Dixon, Progressive Found. - Learn from Nuke Watch how to monitor trucks barreling down your local interstate carrying nuclear waste and weapons parts. With the increase in such truck and rail transport, such a periodical plays a crucial role. Other ways you can act locally to help stop nukes are included. Power Line 1525 New Hampshire Ave, NW Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 745-4877 6/year - $15 Environmental Action Found. - The economic and environmental effects of nuclear power are the chief topic. Electric rates, nuclear accidents and waste management are specifically covered. Democratic Left 15 Dutch St, #500 New York, NY 10038 (212) 962-0390 8/year - $8 Barbara Ehrenrich, Democratic Socialists of America (DSA) - As the magazine of the largest democratic socialist grouping in the country, the Democratic Left should be on the basic list of all social activists. Some news of organizational affairs is included, but is only a fraction of the informative variety of news and feature articles. The views of rank-and-file activists are also given space here, in this effective alliance of grassroots and national organizers. Dissent 521 Fifth Ave. New York, NY 10017 (212) 687-0890 4/year - $15 Found. for Study of Independent Social Ideas - Noted author Irving Howe does a great job of editing and writing for Dissent, a rather scholarly but effective and accurate social democratic journal. Frontline Box 2809 Oakland, CA 94609 (415) 843-7495 23/year - $20 Line of March Publications - Well-know radical journalist Irwin Silber is a key writer and editor of this theoretical Leninist journal. He is typical of the quality and experience of writers for Frontline. The Guardian 33 W. 17th St. New York, NY 10011 (212) 691-0404 46/year - $28 Inst. for Independent Social Journalism - The famed "independent radical newsweekly" founded in 1948 is easily in the top two best left-of-center periodicals in the US. It regularly summarizes the positions of key groups on questions of popular interest, even those groups with which it does not necessarily agree. A controversial "Opinions" section permits a diverse range of analysis of strategies. In These Times 1300 W. Belmont Ave. Chicago, IL 60657 (312) 472-5700 41/year - $35 Inst. for Public Affairs - Democratic socialism is the editorial basis for the newspaper's contents. Its viewpoint is far from the Marxist left, however, with frequent discussions of strategies for working within the Democratic Party. It is strong on its labor and women's movement coverage; less strong on the international front. Militant 14 Charles Ln New York, NY 10014 (212) 929-3486 50/year - $24 Socialist Workers Party - The official paper of the Socialist Workers Party, this selection promotes the ideas of the late Leon Trotsky. This group is noteworthy as the largest Trotskyist grouping and it covers a range of issues. Monthly Review 122 W. 27th St., 10th Fl New York, NY 10001 (212) 691-2555 11/year - $20 Monthly Review Found. - Footnoted and intellectual, this small, independent Marxist journal uses Marxist thought to critique contemporary conditions. Now some 40 years old, this journal is one of the more popular theoretical journals of its genre. Mother Jones 1663 Mission St. San Francisco, CA 94107 (415) 588-8881 10/year - $24 Found. for National Progress - This magazine's namesake was a self-described "hellraiser" and union organizer, and today's Mother Jones is proud to follow in her footsteps. Some 200,000 copies per issue make it one of the most popular progressive periodicals. The features include cultural review, current controversies, and high-quality investigative reporting. Mother Jones is recommended for easy reading on today's issues. The Nation 72 Fifth Ave. New York, NY 10011 (212) 242-8400 52/year - $36 Victor Navasky, Arthur Carter - The popularity of the nation's oldest continually published weekly, first published in 1865, persists due to the brilliant analysis of the best liberal writers in the country. Noteworthy are excellent regular reviews of books, theatre, films and the arts. People's Weekly World 239 W. 23rd St. New York, NY 10011 (212) 924-2523 52/year - $20 normal/$10 for unemployed, seniors & students Long View Publishing Co. - This new product, resulting from the merger of the People's World on the West Coast with the Daily World, is the most socially-concerned daily paper in the US - bar none. It is published weekly. The price is a bargain for this working-class paper featuring a well packaged mixture of culture, labor, national and world news, and other news of people's movements across the US and around the world. VERY highly recommended. The Progressive 409 E. Main St. Madison, WI 53703 (608) 257-4626 12/year - $24 Erwin Knoll, Ruth Greenspan - This fine magazine is highly recommended for its award winning coverage, clear and carefully documented. Its analysis is nicely complemented by its outstanding cultural reviews, which range from music to theatre. Radical America One Summer St. Somerville, MA 02143 (617) 628-6585 6/year - $15 Radical America Collective - Radical America was the harbinger of the many New Left journals that flowered in the 1960s and 1970s. Today it is not only the oldest of this type of journal, first publishing in 1967, but ranks among the best. This independent journal exerts much influence on the democratic left with its articles, properly balanced between historical perspective and topical strategy. Realist Box 1230 Venice, CA 90294 (213) 392-5848 4/year - $8 Paul Krassner - After a 10-year hiatus, The Realist is back, albeit in newsletter format instead of the former magazine. Satire continues to be the forte, with Paul Krassner's irreverent creation poking fun at all staid convention. Krassner continues his '60s participation in the Free Speech Movement with this outrageously funny publication in the tradition of Lenny Bruce. Socialist Review 3202 Adeline St. Berkeley, CA 94703 (415) 547-3732 4/year - $21 Center for Social Research and Education - This 150-odd page paperback-book style magazine is a key voice of the democratic left in the US. Although socialist, it has an apparent aversion to Leninist policies. Operating within the broad consensus that there is no contradiction between democracy and socialism, the journal allows a wide diversity of opinions. 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ŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪm ŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪm ŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪm ŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪm ŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪm ŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪm ŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪm ŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪm ŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪm ŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪm ŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪm ŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmŪmtical groups are the focus of this investigative magazine. The Posse Comitatus and Lyndon LaRouche's NCLC/US Labor Party are typical targets of the analysis here, which includes many fringe political groups. Africa News Box 3851 Durham, N.C. 27702 (919) 286-0747 26/year - $30 Africa News Service - Africa News is a basic progressive selection addressing movements for improving society on that continent. Liberation struggles, reform efforts and solidarity drives are all covered in this useful bi-weekly magazine. Alert!: Focus on Central America Box 12056 Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 265-0890 10/year - $10 Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador (CISPES) - This newspaper is one of the most useful periodicals on Central America. The region from Belize to Nicaragua is covered, often with reporters from the front lines of conflict. Highly recommended. Brigadista Bulletin Box 450 New York, NY 10012 (212) 219-8620 24/year - Donation National Network in Solidarity with the Nicaraguan People - Solidarity work brigades are helping the people of Nicaragua reconstruct their country from Somoza and contra destruction. This bulletin features organizing news of the brigadistas and their humanitarian assistance in construction and farming. Cuba Update 124 W. 23rd St. New York, NY 10011 (212) 242-0559 6/year - $15 Center for Cuban Studies - The progress of the advancement of Cuban society and relations between Cuba and other nations are featured. Interesting perspectives of Cuban barrios, workplaces and culture find space here. Friendship News 162 Madison Ave. New York, NY 10016 (212) 679-4577 4/year - $4 National Council of American-Soviet Friendship - We know that detente produces peace and jobs, and this newsletter tells how we can work toward this mutually beneficial goal. It plays a positive role and concretely helps toward relaxation of tensions between the US and the Soviet Union. New Internationalist Box 1143 Lewiston, NY 14092 (416) 923-7818 12/year - $25 New Internationalist Publications - World poverty and the unjust relationship between the world's rich and poor nations are condemned. This is a truly international periodical with offices in the major English-speaking nations and reports from nations across the globe. Washington Report on the Hemisphere 1612 20th St., NW Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 745-7000 26/year - $105 Council on Hemispheric Affairs - Pluralistic institutions in Latin America are promoted in this group's newsletter. It shares the progressive perspective of other listings, but the price will prevent most individuals and groups from subscribing. World Policy Journal 777 UN Plaza New York, NY 10017 (212) 490-0010 4/year - $20 Sherle Schwenninger, Archibald Gillies - US foreign policy is the concern, with articles provided by progressive university professors. The viewpoint tends to oppose current US hegemony and to favor world democracy and self- determination. American Labor 1835 Kilbourne Pl., NW Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 387-6780 Irreg - $10 American Labor Education Center - Each issue of this 8- page newsletter revolves around a theme. Strike strategy, press relations, job safety, and organizing techniques are four previous themes. Single and bulk copies of past issues can be ordered. Campaign Report - Jobs with Peace Campaign 76 Summer St. Boston, MA 02110 (617) 338-5783 4/year - $15 Jobs with Peace Campaign - Peace conversion from weapons and military-based jobs to employment producing goods for civilian use is the point. Economic Notes 80 E. 11th St., #634 New York, NY 10003 (212) 473-1042 6/year - $20 Labor Research Association - Economic Notes should be a first choice for readers interested in labor economics from a workers' viewpoint. As a news and opinion review, it does a great job of explaining the how and why of labor/capital relations. Industrial Worker 3435 N. Sheffield #202 Chicago, IL 60657 (202) 549-5045 12/year - $4 Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) - The Wobblies are still agitating for one big industrial union, but are not taken as seriously as they were in the early 1900s, when they were shot and jailed by management for their actions. Labor Today 7917 S. Exchange #211 Chicago, IL 60617 (312) 933-4900 4/year - $7 Trade Unionists for Action and Democracy - Labor Today is recommended for rank-and-file labor activists. Union democracy, organizing drives and articles on past and present workers' struggles are among the many topics covered. Its attractive layout and popular writing style are just two reasons workers read it for ideas advancing their interests. Workplace Democracy 111 Draper Amherst, MA 01003 (413) 545-4875 4/year - $18 Julie Melrose, Rob Okun - Workers' social democratic ownership of workplaces is a key focus here, with increased worker control of enterprises owned by others covered too. Workers wanting to reform private enterprise relations will find this journal useful. 10 Best Censored Stories Project Censored Sonoma State University Rohnert Park, CA 94928 (707) 664-2149 1/year - Free Project Censored - The top 10 censored stories of the previous year are capsulized here. A combination of journalism review and bibliographic listing, this annual is an innovative approach to constructive media criticism. Alternative Press Index Box 33109 Baltimore, MD 21218 (301) 243-2471 4/year - $25 All libraries and organizations wishing to keep a record or index of articles appearing in the social concerns press should receive the Alternative Press Index. This quarterly faithfully chronicles progressive articles through its exhaustive efforts at indexing and cross-referencing such journalism. American Right to Read Newsletter 568 Broadway New York, NY 10012 (212) 255-4009 4/year - Free PEN American Center - Censorship is fought with articles on issues such as book-banning attempts. Civil libertarians and library advocates will be interested. Book Newsletter 381 Park Ave. S., #1301 New York, NY 10016 (212) 685-2864 2/year - Free International Publishers - Books on world affairs, socialism, labor, culture and philosophy are all reviewed in this selection. All books and pamphlets by this publisher promote basic social change. It is worth buying a book from their catalog just to be put on their book review mailing list. Censorship News 132 W. 43rd St. New York, NY 10036 (212) 944-9899 4/year - $25 National Coalition Against Censorship - Local challenges to the right to read and responses to these challenges are chronicled in this censorship newsletter. Civil libertarians concerned with availability of information and opinion will appreciate it. Extra! 666 Broadway, #400 New York, NY 10012 (212) 475-4640 10/year - $24 Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR) - News stories that give a fair coverage of social concerns angles on current affairs are promoted in this newsletter. FAIR is a watchdog of disinformation and biased reporting in the regular mass-media. Index on Censorship c/o Fund for Free Expression 36 W. 44th St New York, NY 10036 (212) 840-9460 10/year - $28 Writers & Scholars Int'l - Censorship here and abroad is fought in a dozen or so pieces on writers' suppression by government agencies. It's a rather informal newsletter that often includes poetry and cartoons on free speech. Left Index 511 Lincoln St Santa Cruz, CA 95060 (408) 426-4479 4/year - $30 Reference & Research Services - For left-of-center periodical research, the Left Index is a great choice for readers. It serves as an essential tool for noting articles in the social concerns press.

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