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Ä SRA (1:130/911) ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ SRA Ä Msg : 762 of 765 From : Sandy Doonan 1:102/890.7 Mon 08 Aug 94 19:30 To : Randy M. Fri 12 Aug 94 13:12 Subj : monster ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ rm> Now, here's the question: why will society accept this story as true, rm> but will reject as false the same story under a different name: SRA. rm> Why is it that an adult -- like "The Monster" is now -- tells of rm> killing and maiming people as a part of cult rituals and is rm> DIS-believed, whereas "The Monster" can tell the same story as part of rm> gang culture and be completely believed? It is because there is evidence that this guy has killed. As it is, when someone tells a story about "Satanic" ritual abuse, they never provide specifics which can be falsified because they /will/ be falsified. There are never any names provided, no places referenced, no crime specifics mentioned; the people who actually believe never turn in the people they claim have committed such criminal acts and those who claim to have participated in them are never arrested -- because it's all nonsense. Quite simple, memories of "Satanic" ritual abuse are false memories and there has never been a single court case yet to come to light with any evidence whatsoever. There is, however, a great deal of evidence that well-meaning psychologists implant such 'memories' into people and they do it for very real and unambiguous reasons: money. "Satanic" ritual abuse is big bucks and if one can install MPDs in a person, the therapy is quite costly. It is also because information about False Memory Syndrome is spreading and the cause of psychological disorders and multiple personality disorders are well understood. False Memory Syndrome detracts from real, actual, criminal child sexual abuse. While religious zealots within the nation's police force spend their time concocting stories about 'Satanists' running around the country, real children are being abused in record numbers. Needed resources to combat the real problems are being diverted into the areas of nonsense. Only of late have victims of therapists implanting false memories into their clients been taken to court and sued for their crimes. Sadly, they are not sued for detracting criminal resources from real crimes. We must believe the children, not the nonsense adults dream up. When this monster from Los Angeles was arrested, there was a mountain of evidence. So far, not a single 'Satanists' has /ever/ been arrested for a criminal act. Not a one. And the children who get raped every night by their step-father or every week by their minister get ignored and go to bed angry and frightened. They are ignored because their true real life stories pale in comparison to the false memories implanted by well-meaning religious zealots. You asked. I told you. I see that Brian who is on The Skeptic Tank with me still refuses to speak up about his child abuse. I can only consider how it must be for him to read this forum, wanting people to talk to and help him with his horrible memories, yet unable to because of the utter nonsense he sees posted here. He asked the SysOp to find him a forum just like this and when SysOp did, I can only imagine how disappointed he was. Chalk-up another victim of FMS and claims of SRA. --- * Origin: Believe the children (1:102/890.7) Ä SRA (1:130/911) ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ SRA Ä Msg : 763 of 765 From : Sandy Doonan 1:102/890.7 Mon 08 Aug 94 20:16 To : Randy M. Fri 12 Aug 94 13:12 Subj : monster ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ rm> Now, here's the question: why will society accept this story as true, rm> but will reject as false the same story under a different name: SRA. And for my friend Brian I have researched the facts: Report dismisses Satanic child abuse as a myth by Hugh Muir This material posted 9 June 1994 by Clive Feather Clive D.W. Feather | Santa Cruz Operation clive@sco.com | Croxley Centre Phone: +44 923 816 344 | Hatters Lane, Watford Fax: +44 923 210 352 | WD1 8YN, United Kingdom His comments are in square brackets. [Reproduced without permission from the Daily Telegraph, Friday June 3, 1994 (edition *). This is a reputable daily UK newspaper.] Evangelical Christians and healthcare professionals using dubious information were held responsible yesterday for the myth that children have been victims of widespread ritual and Satanic abuse. A report ordered by Mrs Virgina Bottomley, the Health Secretary, said Christians campaigning against new religious movements had been "a powerful influence encouraging the identification of Satanic abuse". They were joined by psychologists and childcare workers who engineered the hysteria which led to children being taken from their parents in Rochdale, Nottingham, and Orkney. Of 84 cases examined by the researchers, however, no evidence was found to justify any allegation of Satanic abuse and only three claims of ritual abuse were substantiated. Professor Jean La Fontaine, the report's author, said that even these three cases did not merit the description of ritual abuse as the desire for sex was more important than the element of ritual. "I think the evangelicals created the climate in which people could believe this sort of thing was happening" she said. "People began thinking that perhaps it was something they hadn't seen because they hadn't looked and though they had better start looking. That argument is mistaken because we are not talking about a different kind of abuse. It is the same old sexual abuse." Prof La Fontaine added: "In these cases, the children were worryingly disturbed. It was easy to make a mistake by assuming that, because the children were so damaged, what had happened to them must have been so much worse than normal sexual abuse". She said claims that the children themselves alleged Satanic and ritual abuse were false. "The fact is that the small children didn't actually say these things. They said bits and pieces that were picked up by the adults." "You can never say that something doesn't exist. All I can say is that there is no evidence in the cases I have examined." Prof La Fontaine's report was welcomed by Mrs Bottomley, who said there had been "speculating and scaremongering" for years. Calling on professionals to study it, she said: "Professor La Fontaine has abused the myth of Satanic abuse". The 36-page study, called _The_Extent_and_ _Nature_of_Organised_and_Ritual_Abuse_, was commissioned in 1991 after children were removed from their homes in Rochdale and Orkney. It defines ritual abuse as "sexual abuse where there have been allegations of ritual associated with the abuse, whether or not these allegations have been taken any further or tested in the courts". Satanic abuse is defined as "a ritual directed to worship of the Devil". Aided by researchers at Manchester University, Prof La Fontaine asked for details of organised and ritual abuse of children reported between January 1988 and December 1991 and received 211. Researchers studied the records of police and social services departments in eight local authority areas. The Lord Chancellor's Office gave Prof La Fontaine and her team access to 34 files referring to children who had alleged ritual abuse and had been made wards of court. Researchers found that 967 cases of organised abuse and 85 of ritual abuse had occured over four years - meaning that eight percent of all sex abuse allegations involved ritual abuse. Nearly a third of the cases came from the East Midlands, with 21 of those in Nottinghamshire. London had 12 and another 14 occured in the South East. Twelve cases were found in the North West. Primarily, the cases involved "very poor people". Of the men said to have been involved, fewer than a third had a job and only three had middle class occupations. [Nottinghamshire has a population of about 1 million and London (for these purposes) about 6.5 million, out of a total for England and Wales of 49 million (I believe that the study excluded Scotland and Northern Ireland).] The killing of humans was alleged in 35 cases but could not be proved in any of them. Ceremonial robes were mentioned in 28 cases but evidence was found in only two. Once allegations had been made, Prof La Fontaine found that interviews with children were badly conducted, with frequent and aggressive questioning. "What is defended as 'what children say' may be nothing of the sort", the report said. The myth distracted attention from the real plight of many abused children. Ms Valerie Sinason, a consultant child psychologist at the Tavistock Clinic in London, said: "I think it is very worrying to have Mrs Bottomley, a former social worker, discounting the pain of children and adults who come forward and say this is happening to them". --- * Origin: Believe the children (1:102/890.7) Ä SRA (1:130/911) ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ SRA Ä Msg : 764 of 765 From : Sandy Doonan 1:102/890.7 Mon 08 Aug 94 20:17 To : Randy M. Fri 12 Aug 94 13:12 Subj : monster ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ rm> Now, here's the question: why will society accept this story as true, rm> but will reject as false the same story under a different name: SRA. Origins in Book of Revelations There was a sharp reaction from evangelical Christians last night to the suggestion that they were to blame for spreading the myth of satanic abuse [writes Damian Thompson]. The Rev Clive Calver, the Evangelical Alliance director, said he was "dismayed that evangelicals should be dismissed for responding pastorally to people alleging ritual abuse and for seeking to share information with others". But to critics, the report was further evidence that the scare was rooted in the millenarian belief that the world is entering a dark chapter called the "end time" in which the Devil will hold sway. Dr Bill Thompson, a Reading University sociologist, said the "satanic abuse" concept was invented by American fundamentalists convinced that Christ's imminent return will be preceeded by a period of satanic rule foretold in the Book of Revelation. He said: "They needed evidence of satanic activity to validate their religious beliefs". In the past, he argued, fundamentalists helped engineer "moral panics". Satanic abuse, he said, was "the perfect scare". It could be used to convince would-be converts that the end-time was approaching, but could also be toned down for the benefit of social workers. "It's very clever. You can leave out the stuff about the end of the world and concentrate on lists of the signs of abuse" he said. A spokesman for the Evangelical Alliance said yesterday that the Alliance was still convinced that ritual abuse occured. --- * Origin: Believe the children (1:102/890.7)

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