This file is an exerpt from The Book of Darkness, an official work of the Ordo Templi Sata

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This file is an exerpt from The Book of Darkness, an official work of the Ordo Templi Satanis, P.O. Box 1093, Atwater, CA 95301. It is copyright 1991. All persons are hereby given permission to make copies and/or distribute this exerpt, so long as in so doing the contents of this work is not altered in any way, including this paragraph. Satanic Subcultures (From the Book of the World) There seems to be an unconscious resonance between several elements in modern society which, at the onset, would appear to be totally unrelated. However, all of these various sub-cultures within the American mainstream actually have many things in common, most of all a deep harmonic relation of imagery and the basic values which they espouse. It seems only natural that such forces and trends, which are, at their heart, so interrelated, be finally identified as such, so that they might be combined in a single, monumental effort to realize the goals they represent. These forces, and there may be other waiting in the wings awaiting their turn to be recognized, include rock music, totali- tarian political movements, sexual bondage and submission, the interest in the occult and macabre typified by Vampirism, and, of course, Satanism. Of these, rock music contains within it most of the imagery of the others. From the Satanist's pentagram on the cover of a heavy metal album, to the motifs of sexual submission in the lyrics of rock songs, to the vast stadium concerts which are all too reminiscent of the Nazi Party rallies of the 1930's; all these images suggest a vast confluence of the forces contained within the base of each. Satanists have traditionally associated themselves with images normally considered dark and macabre by "mainstream" society. This is merely another aspect of rebellion against society, using such abnormal imagery to achieve certain ends through shock value. These are, too, the same images that are frequently employed by "vampire fans" and certain rock bands. Again, the confluences of the images involved are apparent. Though totalitarian political movements are currently in disrepute in America, and have never enjoyed the sort of popular- ity their adherents (and leaders) may wish or believe, there is a recurring thread through Western society. This current suggests something of a fascination with the Nazis and Fascists of early- 20th Century Europe. Which this is not to say that these groups are admired, per se, they are certainly the objects of an amount of scrutiny and study which seems disproportionate to their overall historical significance. The answer to the question of why this should be so is twofold. First, the imagery and rituals used by the Nazis and Fascists were first-rate pieces of propaganda; it has been sug- gested before that the vast Nueremburg rallies could be consid- ered as enormous Black Magic Workings, focusing the Wills of thousands of participants on a single individual and a single overwhelming goal. It is significant to realize that the Nazi's military reverses began when the Party rallies were halted, and it is well known that the Schutzstaffel (SS) were steeped in ancient Teutonic blood mysticism, and magical rituals were prac- ticed by their leadership and officers throughout the war. Up until the last, the SS were considered the definition of elite troops by both the Allies and Axis. The whole "scene" of Bondage and Discipline (B&D) revolves around the submission of one individual to the Will of another. It simply happens to be expressed in sexual terms, rather than in economic terms. In this, it represents a sort of rebellion in and of itself (and has always been considered to be a "perversion" and therefore carries with it the stigma of the forbidden). This stigma stems, no doubt, from the refusal of Christian hierarchs to accept any sort of sexual activity other than the Missionary position between married people for the purposes of procreation. In regards to bondage, or any other sort of fetishistic sexual practices, the Satanist must remember that the pursuit of physi- cal indulgence for its own sake is a good thing, a worthy goal, and one to be pursued with gusto and verve, regardless of what the Masses may think. The use of bondage regalia and imagery has been associated with Satanism for a long time, and as such can be quite useful in setting the mood for Satanic Magic Workings. Of course, as with any such accouterments, they are mere props for the purpose of focusing the Will, but because of the long history of imagery that associates Satanic practices with chained virgins on altars, medieval torture devices, and the like, they can serve a most useful purpose when attempting to set the mood (or when used for the shock value with a reporter or some such impressionable member of the Masses). Bondage equipment will always convey a subtle, sometimes unconscious reaction in people who are only dimly accustomed to it; the instinctual reaction is to see the owner as inherently dominant, even in the most innocent of social settings. This is Lesser Black Magic in action; the use of subtle psychological cues to influence the behavior of people around you. When you see a young man walking down the street with a pair of handcuffs dangling from his black leather jacket, the effect is calculated to be intimidating. The image portrayed is a combination of dominance (displaying the handcuffs as if to warn they might be used on someone at any time), rebellion (they very idea that someone could so publicly and proudly display what could be considered a sexual device, which should therefore be displayed only in the deepest most private recesses of the boudoir), and a certain amount of unpredictability (if this guy will put hand- cuffs on his jacket, who knows what else he might do?), all add up to a very subtle feeling of intimidation; this is not a person you want to mess with. The Satanist, then, should make an attempt to inculcate these various sub-cultures and may wish to attempt to incorporate their imagery into his various Satanic endeavors. For, whether their adherents wish to acknowledge the fact or not, they are falling in line with the current trend of Satanic thought, and as such, should be welcomed as distant cousins. Does this make every rock musician or Anne Rice fan or B&D'er a Satanist? Certainly not. But it does show an increasing alignment among the forces of the dark side of humanity and society, much of which has been forced upon us by the one foe that we all have in common, which seeks to destroy us piecemeal; Christianity.

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