By: Don Allen Re: Semiconducters 1 of 7 Forwarded from +quot;BAMA+quot; Originally by Walt

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By: Don Allen Re: Semiconducters 1 of 7 * Forwarded from "BAMA" * Originally by Walter Bartoo * Originally to all * Originally dated 2 Jun 1994, 18:29 1 of 7 ( FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE ) Introduction by Bill Ramsay, 251 Asa Hall Road, Iva, SC 29655, (803) 296-3200. Additional information on request. A few notes about the enclosed paper by Bill Fogal, "Charged Barrier Semiconductor Technology and Wave Function Design." I've had several phone conversations with Bill about the specifics of his discovery/invention to clarify my understanding. I hope I've got it right. He uses the term 'electrolytic' in a very generic sense. In his first experimenting some years ago he actually used cut up pieces of electrolytics which he glued to taken apart transis- tors. Most recently he has been using thin tantalum 'slugs.' In "Voice Graphs' B, D and F the apparent flat-topping of the waveforms is really a characteristic of the software technique used which cuts off and piles up all amplitudes above pre-set limits. This was apparently done for presentation pur- poses since the actual dynamic ranges are much greater. I added some notes and a diagram, "Typical Operation", to his Fig. 14 as well as made a minor correction to the 'patent form' detailed rendering (Draftsman error). Bill has done his 'homework' thoroughly and does have Inter- national as well as domestic Patents with one pending in Japan. His presentation of this paper, May 13, 1994, at "The Interna- tional Symposium on New Energy" in Denver was the first public exposure of his discovery/invention. This is certain to create quite a stir - eventually a revolution! I wish I could be a 'fly on the wall' in the Board Rooms of the Semi-conductor giants when this all breaks. Also in those of the Mega-buck funded "Research" places. I'm sure there will be many red faces and frantic scrambles to 'pre-invent' this discovery. But, with the Patents and media attention it should be impossible for the 'technology bandits' to steal! Although, I'm sure some will try! It seems to be still a truism as has been said, "Intelligence is a trait of individuals and varies in inverse proportion to the size of organizations". 2 of 7 CHARGED BARRIER SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY AND WAVE FUNCTION BIPOLAR DESIGNS by William Jay Fogal* ABSTRACT This paper will cover the design and electron wave function on a new patented technology. This new technology is a Charged Barrier Semiconductor with a very high AC voltage and AC current gain. This Charged Barrier Device is on a Bipolar Design that can be incorporated in (MOS) Metal Oxide Semiconductor Designs, as well as multiple gate devices. This semiconductor device operates on a hall effect electromagnetic field internal device. The hall effect magnetic field will force electron flow and angular spin of the electrons in the same direction to the top of the conduction bands in the crystal lattice on semiconductor devices, unlike (SOI) Silicon On Insulator Devices that force electron flow to the surface of the semiconductor lattice. INTRODUCTION Since the conception of the first semiconductor device (TRANSISTOR) in the first half of this Century, semiconductor devices have had many changes to their design. The ultimate goal is to design a device that will transfer electron flow with increased speed and not heat up the process of the transfer of the flow. Today, we have very fast devices, but the scattering of the electrons in the crystal lattice will slow the electron flow and cause the semiconductor to generate heat. This problem is evident in single and multi layer IC semiconductor designs. ____________________ *President of Quick Chek Industries. Inventors and manufacturers of Electronic Testing Devices. Member Advisory Council on Science and Technology. Copyright William Jay Fogal, 1994. 3 of 7 HOW DO CHARGED BARRIER SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES WORK? Charged Barrier Semiconductor Devices incorporate a base plate member of a semiconductor crystal. Also incorporated with the base plate member is a dialectic material and a second base plate member. The combination of the two base plate members constitutes an electrolytic capacitor. The first base plate member will create a transverse elec- tric field that is known as a hall effect in the base plate member of the semiconductor crystal. The ratio of the transverse electric field strength to the product of the current and the magnetic field strength is called the hall coefficient, and its magnitude is inversely proportional to the carrier concentration on the base plate member. The product of the hall coefficient and the conductivity is proportional to the mobility of the carriers when one type of carrier is dominant. Since the base plate member is tied directly to the emitter junction of the semiconductor, the hall coefficient comes into play with the creation of a one pole electromagnet in the base plate member. The hall effect of the electrolytic capacitor in relation to the position on the crystal lattice will force electron angular spin in the same direction and electron flow to the top of the conduction bands in the lattice. The magnetic flux and the density of the carriers on the electrolytic capacitor plate are in direct proportion to the magnetic flux and carrier concentra- tion on the emitter junction on the semiconductor crystal. Since the angular spin and the flow of the electrons are in the same direction, due to the influence of the electromagnetic field, the electron lattice interaction factor does not come into play. The electron wave density is greater and the mobility of the electron flow is faster. The device does not exhibit fre- quency loss in the wave. The base or gate of the semiconductor is more sensitive to input signal. These devices will typically turn on with an input to the junction in the area of .2MV to .4MV with an output at the collector junction of 450MV at 133.5UA of current. ELECTRON WAVE FUNCTION IN CHARGED BARRIER TECHNOLOGY Think of the conduction bands in a crystal lattice as a highway. Electrons in the free state will move along this high- way. The only difference is the electron angular spin can be in different directions. With the electrons spinning in different directions, the electrons would travel on different lanes of the highway and collisions can occur. The scattering and the colli- sion of the electrons can cause friction and resistance to the flow. The resistance to the flow and the friction can cause semiconductors to run hot. In semiconductor devices, this is called lattice scattering or electron lattice interaction. 4 of 7 If we could make the electrons move in one direction, and also spin in the same direction, then we could have more traffic electrons (on the highway) without having the resistance or the collisions. We could put a barrier between the lanes on the highway. But, the electrons could still spin in different directions. But, what if we could charge this barrier! Turn this barrier into an electromagnetic field! An electromagnetic field in one direction. A one pole electromagnet! A hall effect magnetic field. This one pole electromagnetic field would make almost all of the electrons spin in the same direction. Because the electrons are a negative charge and the electromagnetic field has a nega- tive charge the electrons travel in unison and then we could have more electrons on the highway, and the electron travel could be faster. The orientation of the spin of the electrons in the crystal lattice, due to the electromagnetic field has a direct impact on the formation of the wave. If the orientation of the spin of the electrons are in unison, there will be no loss in the wave nature and the density of the wave will be greater and the frequency of the wave will be complete. If the spin of the electrons in the lattice are in different directions, the wave nature will be affected and there will be a loss in the density of the wave. And, there will be a gap in the frequency of the wave. APPLICATIONS FOR THE CHARGED BARRIER TECHNOLOGY * Charged Barrier Technology can be used in computer appli- cations as well as Digital Switching Applications. * With the sensitivity to input of Charged Barrier Devices, there are many applications for the use as front end RF amplifiers for radio telescopes, radar, biomedical ultra- sound imaging and radio communications. * With the density in wave function and no loss in the frequency of the wave, Charged Barrier Devices can be used to enhance the quality of ultrasound imaging. More density in the wave function with no loss in the frequency of the wave, the sharper the picture. * The more density in the wave, the longer the travel of the wave before disruptions to the wave would affect the quality of the transmissions. Applications for use in radar transmissions and receptions for radar imaging and mapping. 5 of 7 * Charged Barrier Technology can be used for fabrication of micro processor circuits to increase the speed in which information can be processed for computer applications. The technology can also be used for Digital Memory Storage and Analog to Digital Converters. * Transmission lines that not only move information, but power over long distances - there would be less need for signal or line transmission amplifiers at certain intervals along a transmission line to boost the signal or power. * Audio electronics for home and cars in which the sound quality and power would be quite unique in the fact there would be no need for equalizers to enhance sound quality, and no need for audio amplifiers to boost the output of the audio from the system. Automotive sound systems could have as much power as 100 to 200 watts of power - just from the radio. * Power supply applications in which there would be no need to have heat sinks to dissipate heat from the internal components. Charged Barrier Devices reduce electron lattice scattering, no heat from components - no need to heat sink. SIMILARITIES OF CHARGED BARRIER DESIGNS TO CURRENT DESIGNS - No known MOS Design Semiconductor or Bipolar Semiconductor Designs can compare to Charged Barrier Semi- conductor Devices. - Standard Bipolar Design Semiconductor devices would not turn on at an input to the junction of .2MV of signal. Standard Bipolar Designs required an input to the junction of 3.5MV to 4.5MV to produce an output at the collector junction of at least 20UA of current. - Charged Barrier Devices will turn on at .2MV of signal at the junction and produce an output at the collector junction of 450MV at 133.5UA of current. - MOS Fet Designs are voltage devices and can not approach the sensitivity of Charged Barrier Devices. WHAT ABOUT SUPERCONDUCTING DEVICES? A Josephson Tunnel Junction or DC Squid incorporates a 50 turn superconduction loop to create an electromagnetic field around the junction for the junction to work. Charged Barrier Devices use an electrolytic capacitor to create a hall effect electromagnetic field around a bipolar junction. 6 of 7 THE (FIG. 7) (SIS) QUASIPARTICLE JUNCTION The characteristics of the Charged Barrier Semiconductor are similar to the characteristics of the FIG. 7 (SIS) Quasiparticle Junction. The FIG. 7 junction will turn on at an input of 3MV and produce a current of just over 200UA. Charged Barrier De- vices will turn on at .2MV with an output of 133.5UA. WHAT IF? A wafer frozen at a temperature of 1.2K or (-457.5F) would force electrons from their orbit around the atoms to the top of the wafer, where they would become free electrons. The top of the wafer would then act like an electrolytic capacitor because of the electron carrier concentration to the top of the wafer. On electrolytic capacitor's, carrier concentration will be on one plate of the capacitor. The top of the wafer would then act like a hall effect magnetic field. The electrons would then have an angular spin the same direction, due to the influence of the hall effect magnetic field. A permanent magnet suspended over the top of wafer would tend to rotate in the same direction as the angu- lar spin of the electrons on the top of the wafer. DIGITAL VOICE GRAPH The voice graphs show the word (Atlanta Braves) over the digital transmission lines. The transmission was broken down from transmissions of digital speech over the transmission sys- tem. The sentence was then broken down to the single two words (Atlanta Braves) to receive an accurate reading of the transmis- sion. The transmission in FIG. (A) is that of an adult male voice over the digital transmission network. The voice pattern does not have adequate definition and frequency response in the pat- tern. The transmission in FIG. (B) is the same adult male voice pattern over the digital transmission network with the use of the Charged Barrier Technology. The voice pattern has both, defini- tion and frequency response in the pattern. The transmission in FIG. (C) is that of a teenage male voice pattern over the digital transmission network. The voice pattern does not have adequate definition and frequency response in the pattern. The transmission in FIG. (D) is the same teenage voice pattern over the digital transmission network with the Charged Barrier Technology. The voice pattern has both, definition and frequency response in the pattern. 7 of 7 The transmission in FIG. (E) is that of an adult woman voice pattern over the digital transmission network. Again, both definition and frequency response are not adequate in the voice pattern. The transmission in FIG. (F) is the same adult woman voice pattern over the digital transmission network with the Charged Barrier Technology. The voice pattern has both, defini- tion and frequency response in the pattern. SCHEMATIC ON CHARGED BARRIER DESIGN The design on Charged Barrier Technology is covered in the FIG. (14) diagram. The junctions of the semiconductor are as follows: Emitter Junction (124), Base Junction (126), and Col- lector Junction (128). The Charged Barrier Technology on the semiconductor crystal base plate are listed as follows: First refractory base plate member (120), Dialectic (118) and Second Base Plate Member (116). The resistor material is listed as (114). The first refrac- tory base plate member is tied directly to the emitter junction on the semiconductor crystal. The resistor material is connected to the emitter junction on the semiconductor crystal along with the first base plate member. The second base plate member, along with the resistive material, is tied to a ground source. As the emitter junction receives the concentration of carriers, the refractory base plate member will receive the same carrier concentration as the emitter junction. The grounded second base plate member will force carrier concentration to gather on the first refractory base plate member and not discharge across the base plates. The resistive material will allow a path to ground for the carrier concentration on the emitter junction and the first refractory base plate member. The action will constantly change the rate of carrier concentration on the refractory base plate member. The refractory base plate member will create an electromagnetic field as the carrier concentration changes on the base plate member. This will create the electromagnetic field in the semiconductor substrate of the semiconductor crystal. This can be the basic design for (Metal Oxide) MOS Design Semiconductor Technology. This design will not harm the channel width or depth in MOS designs. The base plate member can be in sections to cover different parts of chip fabrication. The base plate members can be sectioned for different parts of construction and can be tied together in parallel with the carrier source to even the carrier concentration between the different base plate members on IC chip designs. The construc- tion can also be covered in FIGURES (10) through FIGURES (13). This construction is for single chip fabrication on Bipolar and Darlingtor Design Transistors. ( End Of File ) For additional information, patents, charts, tests, and lab data contact Bil Ramsey on cover page.

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