Now that +quot;Abduction Mania+quot; resulting from the CBS-TV miniseries +quot;Intruders+

---
Master Index Current Directory Index Go to SkepticTank Go to Human Rights activist Keith Henson Go to Scientology cult

Skeptic Tank!

Now that "Abduction Mania" resulting from the CBS-TV miniseries "Intruders" (May 17 and 19) will soon be upon us, I offer the following as if to "light one candle rather than curse the darkness." The author is Martin S. Kottmeyer of Carlyle, Illinois, who is one of the most widely-read individuals I have ever encountered. He has published a few papers, mostly in British journals such as "Magonia" Now that "Abduction Mania" resulting from the CBS-TV miniseries "Intruders" (May 17 and 19) will soon be upon us, I offer the following as if to "light one candle rather than curse the darkness." The author is Martin S. Kottmeyer of Carlyle, Illinois, who is one of the most widely-read individuals I have ever encountered. He has published a few papers, mostly in British journals such as "Magonia" Now that "Abduction Mania" resulting from the CBS-TV miniseries "Intruders" (May 17 and 19) will soon be upon us, I offer the following as if to "light one candle rather than curse the darkness." The author is Martin S. Kottmeyer of Carlyle, Illinois, who is one of the most widely-read individuals I have ever encountered. He has published a few papers, mostly in British journals such as "Magonia" Now that "Abduction Mania" resulting from the CBS-TV miniseries "Intruders" (May 17 and 19) will soon be upon us, I offer the following as if to "light one candle rather than curse the darkness." The author is Martin S. Kottmeyer of Carlyle, Illinois, who is one of the most widely-read individuals I have ever encountered. He has published a few papers, mostly in British journals such as "Magonia"e ETH. David Jacobs argues that the imagery of the UFO phenomenon sprang up _ex nihilo_ in 1947. Budd Hopkins states that the complex, controlling, physically frail beings of abduction reports bear no similarity to "traditional sci-fi gods and devils". Thomas E. Bullard makes the rather more modest claim that the keystone of the abduction mystery, the interrupted journey of Betty and Barney Hill, had no cultural sources from e ETH. David Jacobs argues that the imagery of the UFO phenomenon sprang up _ex nihilo_ in 1947. Budd Hopkins states that the complex, controlling, physically frail beings of abduction reports bear no similarity to "traditional sci-fi gods and devils". Thomas E. Bullard makes the rather more modest claim that the keystone of the abduction mystery, the interrupted journey of Betty and Barney Hill, had no cultural sources from e ETH. David Jacobs argues that the imagery of the UFO phenomenon sprang up _ex nihilo_ in 1947. Budd Hopkins states that the complex, controlling, physically frail beings of abduction reports bear no similarity to "traditional sci-fi gods and devils". Thomas E. Bullard makes the rather more modest claim that the keystone of the abduction mystery, the interrupted journey of Betty and Barney Hill, had no cultural sources from e ETH. David Jacobs argues that the imagery of the UFO phenomenon sprang up _ex nihilo_ in 1947. Budd Hopkins states that the complex, controlling, physically frail beings of abduction reports bear no similarity to "traditional sci-fi gods and devils". Thomas E. Bullard makes the rather more modest claim that the keystone of the abduction mystery, the interrupted journey of Betty and Barney Hill, had no cultural sources from shape of spaceships in the culture; it was the rocket. In this larger sense Jacobs is correct that one would expect an outbreak of ghost rockets over America if the images of SF were the determinant of what people should be imagining. They weren't. The cultural source of the UFO lies in a journalistic error. Kenneth Arnold's report of mysterious supersonic objects flying near Mount Rainier was a sensation that made front- shape of spaceships in the culture; it was the rocket. In this larger sense Jacobs is correct that one would expect an outbreak of ghost rockets over America if the images of SF were the determinant of what people should be imagining. They weren't. The cultural source of the UFO lies in a journalistic error. Kenneth Arnold's report of mysterious supersonic objects flying near Mount Rainier was a sensation that made front- shape of spaceships in the culture; it was the rocket. In this larger sense Jacobs is correct that one would expect an outbreak of ghost rockets over America if the images of SF were the determinant of what people should be imagining. They weren't. The cultural source of the UFO lies in a journalistic error. Kenneth Arnold's report of mysterious supersonic objects flying near Mount Rainier was a sensation that made front- shape of spaceships in the culture; it was the rocket. In this larger sense Jacobs is correct that one would expect an outbreak of ghost rockets over America if the images of SF were the determinant of what people should be imagining. They weren't. The cultural source of the UFO lies in a journalistic error. Kenneth Arnold's report of mysterious supersonic objects flying near Mount Rainier was a sensation that made front-hy would extraterrestrials redesign their craft to conform to Bequette's error? This paradox is especially bad news for abduction reports. By Bullard's tally 82% of craft descriptions fit the flying saucer stereotype.[7] This is far in excess of the approximately one- third portion saucers and discs make up in a more general population of UFO reports.[8] If imagination and cultural expectations play ahy would extraterrestrials redesign their craft to conform to Bequette's error? This paradox is especially bad news for abduction reports. By Bullard's tally 82% of craft descriptions fit the flying saucer stereotype.[7] This is far in excess of the approximately one- third portion saucers and discs make up in a more general population of UFO reports.[8] If imagination and cultural expectations play ahy would extraterrestrials redesign their craft to conform to Bequette's error? This paradox is especially bad news for abduction reports. By Bullard's tally 82% of craft descriptions fit the flying saucer stereotype.[7] This is far in excess of the approximately one- third portion saucers and discs make up in a more general population of UFO reports.[8] If imagination and cultural expectations play ahy would extraterrestrials redesign their craft to conform to Bequette's error? This paradox is especially bad news for abduction reports. By Bullard's tally 82% of craft descriptions fit the flying saucer stereotype.[7] This is far in excess of the approximately one- third portion saucers and discs make up in a more general population of UFO reports.[8] If imagination and cultural expectations play aHopkins professes it is instructive that his abductees are not devoured like in War of the Worlds, but how would a myth devour a person? That Hopkins is ignorant of science fiction would be apparent to any fan by the fact that he used the repellent phrase "sci-fi' - a sure sign of an outsider to the genre.[10] War of the Worlds is one of the recognized masterpieces, yet it is grossly evident Hopkins never read it or he would be co-opHopkins professes it is instructive that his abductees are not devoured like in War of the Worlds, but how would a myth devour a person? That Hopkins is ignorant of science fiction would be apparent to any fan by the fact that he used the repellent phrase "sci-fi' - a sure sign of an outsider to the genre.[10] War of the Worlds is one of the recognized masterpieces, yet it is grossly evident Hopkins never read it or he would be co-opHopkins professes it is instructive that his abductees are not devoured like in War of the Worlds, but how would a myth devour a person? That Hopkins is ignorant of science fiction would be apparent to any fan by the fact that he used the repellent phrase "sci-fi' - a sure sign of an outsider to the genre.[10] War of the Worlds is one of the recognized masterpieces, yet it is grossly evident Hopkins never read it or he would be co-opHopkins professes it is instructive that his abductees are not devoured like in War of the Worlds, but how would a myth devour a person? That Hopkins is ignorant of science fiction would be apparent to any fan by the fact that he used the repellent phrase "sci-fi' - a sure sign of an outsider to the genre.[10] War of the Worlds is one of the recognized masterpieces, yet it is grossly evident Hopkins never read it or he would be co-opesperately need to survive. This places UFO aliens squarely in the main tradition of aliens in SF films. Dying worlds are commonplace in alien invasion movies. It leads the aliens in "This Island Earth" to borrow Earth scientists for their expertise in atomic energy. It motivates the aliens in "The 27th Day" to give Earth people the means of destroying human life. It motivates the "Killers from Space" to operate on a man, esperately need to survive. This places UFO aliens squarely in the main tradition of aliens in SF films. Dying worlds are commonplace in alien invasion movies. It leads the aliens in "This Island Earth" to borrow Earth scientists for their expertise in atomic energy. It motivates the aliens in "The 27th Day" to give Earth people the means of destroying human life. It motivates the "Killers from Space" to operate on a man, esperately need to survive. This places UFO aliens squarely in the main tradition of aliens in SF films. Dying worlds are commonplace in alien invasion movies. It leads the aliens in "This Island Earth" to borrow Earth scientists for their expertise in atomic energy. It motivates the aliens in "The 27th Day" to give Earth people the means of destroying human life. It motivates the "Killers from Space" to operate on a man, esperately need to survive. This places UFO aliens squarely in the main tradition of aliens in SF films. Dying worlds are commonplace in alien invasion movies. It leads the aliens in "This Island Earth" to borrow Earth scientists for their expertise in atomic energy. It motivates the aliens in "The 27th Day" to give Earth people the means of destroying human life. It motivates the "Killers from Space" to operate on a man, featured in the 1953 movie "Invaders from Mars"[15] Take a look at the creatures of the 1957 movie "Invasion of The Saucer Men". The bald, bulgy-brained, googly-eyed, no-nosed invaders match the stereotype of UFO aliens delineated by Bullard to an uncanny extent. It prompts worries that abductees are not only plagiarists, but have bad taste as well.[16] "Earth versus the Flying Saucers" (1956) also precedes UFO lore in fe featured in the 1953 movie "Invaders from Mars"[15] Take a look at the creatures of the 1957 movie "Invasion of The Saucer Men". The bald, bulgy-brained, googly-eyed, no-nosed invaders match the stereotype of UFO aliens delineated by Bullard to an uncanny extent. It prompts worries that abductees are not only plagiarists, but have bad taste as well.[16] "Earth versus the Flying Saucers" (1956) also precedes UFO lore in fe featured in the 1953 movie "Invaders from Mars"[15] Take a look at the creatures of the 1957 movie "Invasion of The Saucer Men". The bald, bulgy-brained, googly-eyed, no-nosed invaders match the stereotype of UFO aliens delineated by Bullard to an uncanny extent. It prompts worries that abductees are not only plagiarists, but have bad taste as well.[16] "Earth versus the Flying Saucers" (1956) also precedes UFO lore in fe featured in the 1953 movie "Invaders from Mars"[15] Take a look at the creatures of the 1957 movie "Invasion of The Saucer Men". The bald, bulgy-brained, googly-eyed, no-nosed invaders match the stereotype of UFO aliens delineated by Bullard to an uncanny extent. It prompts worries that abductees are not only plagiarists, but have bad taste as well.[16] "Earth versus the Flying Saucers" (1956) also precedes UFO lore in feductees aren't generally given a tour of the ship before examination or conference and so forth. Bullard considers the arrangement occasionally arbitrary from a rational standpoint. The fidelity of reports to this arrangement seems, to Bullard, to indicate these are real experiences. He would expect the elements of the story to get jumbled if they were subjective.[17] What, then, are we to make of the 1930 comic strip stductees aren't generally given a tour of the ship before examination or conference and so forth. Bullard considers the arrangement occasionally arbitrary from a rational standpoint. The fidelity of reports to this arrangement seems, to Bullard, to indicate these are real experiences. He would expect the elements of the story to get jumbled if they were subjective.[17] What, then, are we to make of the 1930 comic strip stductees aren't generally given a tour of the ship before examination or conference and so forth. Bullard considers the arrangement occasionally arbitrary from a rational standpoint. The fidelity of reports to this arrangement seems, to Bullard, to indicate these are real experiences. He would expect the elements of the story to get jumbled if they were subjective.[17] What, then, are we to make of the 1930 comic strip stductees aren't generally given a tour of the ship before examination or conference and so forth. Bullard considers the arrangement occasionally arbitrary from a rational standpoint. The fidelity of reports to this arrangement seems, to Bullard, to indicate these are real experiences. He would expect the elements of the story to get jumbled if they were subjective.[17] What, then, are we to make of the 1930 comic strip stple subconsciously acquired from exposure to drama. A relabeling of Bullard's elements should make the logic clearer: (i) character introduced, (ii) peril and conflict, (iii) explanation and insight, (iv) good will and attempt to impress, (v) excitement, (vi) climax, (vii) closure, (viii) sequel. Examination, as the peril, is the downer part of the story and would ruin a happy ending if sequenced late. Even in deviant ple subconsciously acquired from exposure to drama. A relabeling of Bullard's elements should make the logic clearer: (i) character introduced, (ii) peril and conflict, (iii) explanation and insight, (iv) good will and attempt to impress, (v) excitement, (vi) climax, (vii) closure, (viii) sequel. Examination, as the peril, is the downer part of the story and would ruin a happy ending if sequenced late. Even in deviant ple subconsciously acquired from exposure to drama. A relabeling of Bullard's elements should make the logic clearer: (i) character introduced, (ii) peril and conflict, (iii) explanation and insight, (iv) good will and attempt to impress, (v) excitement, (vi) climax, (vii) closure, (viii) sequel. Examination, as the peril, is the downer part of the story and would ruin a happy ending if sequenced late. Even in deviant ple subconsciously acquired from exposure to drama. A relabeling of Bullard's elements should make the logic clearer: (i) character introduced, (ii) peril and conflict, (iii) explanation and insight, (iv) good will and attempt to impress, (v) excitement, (vi) climax, (vii) closure, (viii) sequel. Examination, as the peril, is the downer part of the story and would ruin a happy ending if sequenced late. Even in deviant ogers situation. How odd, then, to note that such a thing appears in the Steven Kilburn abduction in "Missing Time". It seems such a ridiculously impractical thing for a technologically superior culture to bother with, yet Hopkins includes it with not an indication of amusement. One can understand it in a 1930s cartoon, or even in an early script draft of "War of the Worlds". At least someone realised it should be delogers situation. How odd, then, to note that such a thing appears in the Steven Kilburn abduction in "Missing Time". It seems such a ridiculously impractical thing for a technologically superior culture to bother with, yet Hopkins includes it with not an indication of amusement. One can understand it in a 1930s cartoon, or even in an early script draft of "War of the Worlds". At least someone realised it should be delogers situation. How odd, then, to note that such a thing appears in the Steven Kilburn abduction in "Missing Time". It seems such a ridiculously impractical thing for a technologically superior culture to bother with, yet Hopkins includes it with not an indication of amusement. One can understand it in a 1930s cartoon, or even in an early script draft of "War of the Worlds". At least someone realised it should be delogers situation. How odd, then, to note that such a thing appears in the Steven Kilburn abduction in "Missing Time". It seems such a ridiculously impractical thing for a technologically superior culture to bother with, yet Hopkins includes it with not an indication of amusement. One can understand it in a 1930s cartoon, or even in an early script draft of "War of the Worlds". At least someone realised it should be del starts off handicapped."[22] Part of the mystery is solved by a careful reading of "The Interrupted Journey." It is on record that Betty Hill had read Donald Keyhoe's book "The Flying Saucer Conspiracy" shortly before she be an having nightmares of abduction. Keyhoe's book cites nearly a dozen occupant cases. Most of them are outright rejected by Keyhoe. These include such farces a starts off handicapped."[22] Part of the mystery is solved by a careful reading of "The Interrupted Journey." It is on record that Betty Hill had read Donald Keyhoe's book "The Flying Saucer Conspiracy" shortly before she be an having nightmares of abduction. Keyhoe's book cites nearly a dozen occupant cases. Most of them are outright rejected by Keyhoe. These include such farces a starts off handicapped."[22] Part of the mystery is solved by a careful reading of "The Interrupted Journey." It is on record that Betty Hill had read Donald Keyhoe's book "The Flying Saucer Conspiracy" shortly before she be an having nightmares of abduction. Keyhoe's book cites nearly a dozen occupant cases. Most of them are outright rejected by Keyhoe. These include such farces a starts off handicapped."[22] Part of the mystery is solved by a careful reading of "The Interrupted Journey." It is on record that Betty Hill had read Donald Keyhoe's book "The Flying Saucer Conspiracy" shortly before she be an having nightmares of abduction. Keyhoe's book cites nearly a dozen occupant cases. Most of them are outright rejected by Keyhoe. These include such farces ar short men. Barney is unconscious and is being dragged by another group of men. They numbered eight to eleven when standing in the middle of the road. They are taken from the car to a glowing saucer-shaped craft. The behaviour of the aliens is very professional and businesslike and they are dressed in somewhat military style. They are not frightening per se. This is very much in keeping in tone with Keyhoe's speculations thatr short men. Barney is unconscious and is being dragged by another group of men. They numbered eight to eleven when standing in the middle of the road. They are taken from the car to a glowing saucer-shaped craft. The behaviour of the aliens is very professional and businesslike and they are dressed in somewhat military style. They are not frightening per se. This is very much in keeping in tone with Keyhoe's speculations thatr short men. Barney is unconscious and is being dragged by another group of men. They numbered eight to eleven when standing in the middle of the road. They are taken from the car to a glowing saucer-shaped craft. The behaviour of the aliens is very professional and businesslike and they are dressed in somewhat military style. They are not frightening per se. This is very much in keeping in tone with Keyhoe's speculations thatr short men. Barney is unconscious and is being dragged by another group of men. They numbered eight to eleven when standing in the middle of the road. They are taken from the car to a glowing saucer-shaped craft. The behaviour of the aliens is very professional and businesslike and they are dressed in somewhat military style. They are not frightening per se. This is very much in keeping in tone with Keyhoe's speculations thatice at the end of the needle is going to be surgically implanted there.[27] In "The Interrupted Journey" we are dealing with a woman and a man abducted by aliens described as mongoloid - itself a type of mutation. In the original nightmare Betty compares the noses of the aliens to Jimmy Durante. This is a very apt description of the noses of the mutants in "Invaders From Mars". Barney, oddly, didn't see the Durante noses of theice at the end of the needle is going to be surgically implanted there.[27] In "The Interrupted Journey" we are dealing with a woman and a man abducted by aliens described as mongoloid - itself a type of mutation. In the original nightmare Betty compares the noses of the aliens to Jimmy Durante. This is a very apt description of the noses of the mutants in "Invaders From Mars". Barney, oddly, didn't see the Durante noses of theice at the end of the needle is going to be surgically implanted there.[27] In "The Interrupted Journey" we are dealing with a woman and a man abducted by aliens described as mongoloid - itself a type of mutation. In the original nightmare Betty compares the noses of the aliens to Jimmy Durante. This is a very apt description of the noses of the mutants in "Invaders From Mars". Barney, oddly, didn't see the Durante noses of theice at the end of the needle is going to be surgically implanted there.[27] In "The Interrupted Journey" we are dealing with a woman and a man abducted by aliens described as mongoloid - itself a type of mutation. In the original nightmare Betty compares the noses of the aliens to Jimmy Durante. This is a very apt description of the noses of the mutants in "Invaders From Mars". Barney, oddly, didn't see the Durante noses of the structure being a tubular metal beam or conduit connecting ceiling to floor. It bears a stylistic similarity to the neck implanter in having a clear plastic sheath surrounding the upper half of its length. The ambiguity of the image, however, admits an alternative interpretation. The tubular metal beam and plastic sheath becomes a hypodermic needle. Lighting of the floor suggests the curvature of an abdomen. The place where th structure being a tubular metal beam or conduit connecting ceiling to floor. It bears a stylistic similarity to the neck implanter in having a clear plastic sheath surrounding the upper half of its length. The ambiguity of the image, however, admits an alternative interpretation. The tubular metal beam and plastic sheath becomes a hypodermic needle. Lighting of the floor suggests the curvature of an abdomen. The place where th structure being a tubular metal beam or conduit connecting ceiling to floor. It bears a stylistic similarity to the neck implanter in having a clear plastic sheath surrounding the upper half of its length. The ambiguity of the image, however, admits an alternative interpretation. The tubular metal beam and plastic sheath becomes a hypodermic needle. Lighting of the floor suggests the curvature of an abdomen. The place where th structure being a tubular metal beam or conduit connecting ceiling to floor. It bears a stylistic similarity to the neck implanter in having a clear plastic sheath surrounding the upper half of its length. The ambiguity of the image, however, admits an alternative interpretation. The tubular metal beam and plastic sheath becomes a hypodermic needle. Lighting of the floor suggests the curvature of an abdomen. The place where tha meeting with a scientist at an observatory. This character, Dr. Kelson, has a large star map on the wall behind him. He points at the map during this meeting and discusses the proximity of Mars to Earth. The most striking thing about this discussion, to the alert movie-goer, is that, while he points to the map as though these two planets are represented on it, in fact there is nothing there where the Earth should be. Kelson is faking it. a meeting with a scientist at an observatory. This character, Dr. Kelson, has a large star map on the wall behind him. He points at the map during this meeting and discusses the proximity of Mars to Earth. The most striking thing about this discussion, to the alert movie-goer, is that, while he points to the map as though these two planets are represented on it, in fact there is nothing there where the Earth should be. Kelson is faking it. a meeting with a scientist at an observatory. This character, Dr. Kelson, has a large star map on the wall behind him. He points at the map during this meeting and discusses the proximity of Mars to Earth. The most striking thing about this discussion, to the alert movie-goer, is that, while he points to the map as though these two planets are represented on it, in fact there is nothing there where the Earth should be. Kelson is faking it. a meeting with a scientist at an observatory. This character, Dr. Kelson, has a large star map on the wall behind him. He points at the map during this meeting and discusses the proximity of Mars to Earth. The most striking thing about this discussion, to the alert movie-goer, is that, while he points to the map as though these two planets are represented on it, in fact there is nothing there where the Earth should be. Kelson is faking it. abducted, it would be unusual for her nightmares to be a photographic reply of her trauma. The felt emotions would resurface, but it would bear only a metaphoric similarity in its dramatic content. The most one would generally expect is snatches of unique imagery to help in piecing together of the sources the dream spun off from. It is something of a wonder that enough elements exist of this character - the Durante nos abducted, it would be unusual for her nightmares to be a photographic reply of her trauma. The felt emotions would resurface, but it would bear only a metaphoric similarity in its dramatic content. The most one would generally expect is snatches of unique imagery to help in piecing together of the sources the dream spun off from. It is something of a wonder that enough elements exist of this character - the Durante nos abducted, it would be unusual for her nightmares to be a photographic reply of her trauma. The felt emotions would resurface, but it would bear only a metaphoric similarity in its dramatic content. The most one would generally expect is snatches of unique imagery to help in piecing together of the sources the dream spun off from. It is something of a wonder that enough elements exist of this character - the Durante nos abducted, it would be unusual for her nightmares to be a photographic reply of her trauma. The felt emotions would resurface, but it would bear only a metaphoric similarity in its dramatic content. The most one would generally expect is snatches of unique imagery to help in piecing together of the sources the dream spun off from. It is something of a wonder that enough elements exist of this character - the Durante nosFebruary 1964. Only twelve days separate the two instances. If the identification is admitted, the commonness of wraparound eyes in the abduction literature falls to cultural forces.[32] Wilder Penfield once proclaimed, "It is far better to be wrong than to bc without an opinion." Penfield showed himself to be a wise scientist in formulating that maxim. Errors are much more fruitful than silence. They goad one into resFebruary 1964. Only twelve days separate the two instances. If the identification is admitted, the commonness of wraparound eyes in the abduction literature falls to cultural forces.[32] Wilder Penfield once proclaimed, "It is far better to be wrong than to bc without an opinion." Penfield showed himself to be a wise scientist in formulating that maxim. Errors are much more fruitful than silence. They goad one into resFebruary 1964. Only twelve days separate the two instances. If the identification is admitted, the commonness of wraparound eyes in the abduction literature falls to cultural forces.[32] Wilder Penfield once proclaimed, "It is far better to be wrong than to bc without an opinion." Penfield showed himself to be a wise scientist in formulating that maxim. Errors are much more fruitful than silence. They goad one into resFebruary 1964. Only twelve days separate the two instances. If the identification is admitted, the commonness of wraparound eyes in the abduction literature falls to cultural forces.[32] Wilder Penfield once proclaimed, "It is far better to be wrong than to bc without an opinion." Penfield showed himself to be a wise scientist in formulating that maxim. Errors are much more fruitful than silence. They goad one into res Blue Book", Ballantine, 1976. Arnold, Kenneth, "How it All Began", in Fuller, Curtis G., "Proceedings of the First International UFO Conference", Warner, 1980 7. Bullard, Thomas E., "UFO Abductions: The Measure of a Mystery. Volume 1: Comparative Study of Abduction Reports." Fund for UFO Research, 1987, p. 196. 8. Story, Ronald D., "Encyclopedia of UFOs", Dolphin, 1980, pp. 330-4 Blue Book", Ballantine, 1976. Arnold, Kenneth, "How it All Began", in Fuller, Curtis G., "Proceedings of the First International UFO Conference", Warner, 1980 7. Bullard, Thomas E., "UFO Abductions: The Measure of a Mystery. Volume 1: Comparative Study of Abduction Reports." Fund for UFO Research, 1987, p. 196. 8. Story, Ronald D., "Encyclopedia of UFOs", Dolphin, 1980, pp. 330-4 Blue Book", Ballantine, 1976. Arnold, Kenneth, "How it All Began", in Fuller, Curtis G., "Proceedings of the First International UFO Conference", Warner, 1980 7. Bullard, Thomas E., "UFO Abductions: The Measure of a Mystery. Volume 1: Comparative Study of Abduction Reports." Fund for UFO Research, 1987, p. 196. 8. Story, Ronald D., "Encyclopedia of UFOs", Dolphin, 1980, pp. 330-4 Blue Book", Ballantine, 1976. Arnold, Kenneth, "How it All Began", in Fuller, Curtis G., "Proceedings of the First International UFO Conference", Warner, 1980 7. Bullard, Thomas E., "UFO Abductions: The Measure of a Mystery. Volume 1: Comparative Study of Abduction Reports." Fund for UFO Research, 1987, p. 196. 8. Story, Ronald D., "Encyclopedia of UFOs", Dolphin, 1980, pp. 330-4., pp. 240-6. 25. Fuller, op. cit, p. 343-4. Keyhoe, op. cit., pp. 58, 65,190,208. 26. Bullard, op. cit., p. 14 27. "Invaders From Mars" (1953), video, Fox Hills Video, 1987. 28. Fuller, op. cit., p. 344. Bullard, op. cit., p. 245. 29. Friedman, Stanton and Slate, B. Ann, "UFO Star Base Discovered", UFO Report, 2, no. 1, fall 1974, p. 61. 30. Battle, John Tucker, "Invaders From Mars", Script ., pp. 240-6. 25. Fuller, op. cit, p. 343-4. Keyhoe, op. cit., pp. 58, 65,190,208. 26. Bullard, op. cit., p. 14 27. "Invaders From Mars" (1953), video, Fox Hills Video, 1987. 28. Fuller, op. cit., p. 344. Bullard, op. cit., p. 245. 29. Friedman, Stanton and Slate, B. Ann, "UFO Star Base Discovered", UFO Report, 2, no. 1, fall 1974, p. 61. 30. Battle, John Tucker, "Invaders From Mars", Script ., pp. 240-6. 25. Fuller, op. cit, p. 343-4. Keyhoe, op. cit., pp. 58, 65,190,208. 26. Bullard, op. cit., p. 14 27. "Invaders From Mars" (1953), video, Fox Hills Video, 1987. 28. Fuller, op. cit., p. 344. Bullard, op. cit., p. 245.

---

E-Mail Fredric L. Rice / The Skeptic Tank