By: Elliott Finesse Re: PAT ROBERTSON:certified W +quot; The work of a secret feminist age

---
Master Index Current Directory Index Go to SkepticTank Go to Human Rights activist Keith Henson Go to Scientology cult

Skeptic Tank!

By: Elliott Finesse Re: PAT ROBERTSON:certified W " The work of a secret feminist agenda that is not about equal rights for women. It is about a socialist, anti-family political movement that encourages women to leave their husbands, kill their children, practice witchcraft, destroy capitalism and become lesbians." -- Pat Robertson on the Iowa Equal Rights Amendment "Robertson's following provides much of the _$233_ million annual income. In a year, views of the 700 club log 4 million prayer calls to 4500 volunteers manning telephone banks in 60 counseling centers. Such motivated constituencies can - and do - bestow blessings aplenty, in the form of money and votes, upon candidates who win their favor." --Power, Glory --And Politics (Cover Story) Time Magazine 2/17/86 p.62 --- GENOCIDAL ACT OF "LOVE" Pat Robertson supports the concept of genocide. He believes that the mass murder of sinners is acceptable, or even desirable. "The statement necessarily implies that whenever evangelization efforts meet with chronic resistance, extermination should follow." 700 Club May 6, 1985 Begin transcript: Audience Participant: I've been reading through the Book of Numbers recently, and come across that passage in Chapter 31 about the destruction of the Midianites. How do you explain that apparent travesty of the destruction of that people with the just and holy God? Pat Robertson: The wars of extermination have given a lot of people trouble unless they understand fully what was going on. The people in the land of Palestine were very wicked. They were given over to idolatry. They sacrificed their children. They had all kinds of abominable sex practices. They were having sex apparently with animals. They were having sex men with men and women with women. They were committing adultery and fornication. They were serving idols. As I say, they were offering their children up, and they were forsaking God. Now you say, " God told the Israelites to kill them all: men, women and children; to destroy them." And that seems like a terrible thing to do. Is it or isn't it? Well, let us assume that there were two thousand of them or ten thousand of them living in the land, or whatever number [note: there were more like 100,000] I don't have the exact number, but pick a number. And God said "Kill 'em' all." Well, that would seem hard, wouldn't it? But that would be 10,000 people who probably would go to hell. But if they stayed and reproduced, in thirty, forty or fifty or sixty or a hundred more years there could conceivably be ... ten thousand would grow to a hundred [thousand], a hundred thousand conceivably could grow to a million, and there would be a million people who would have to spend an eternity in Hell. And it is far more merciful to take away a few than to see in the future a hundred years down the road, and say, "Well, I'll have to take away a million people, that will be forever apart from God because the abomination is there." It's like a contagion. God saw that there was no cure for it. It wasn't going to change., and all they would do is cause trouble for the Israelites and pull the Israelites away from God and prevent the truth of God from reaching the earth. And so God in love - and that was a loving thing - took away a small number that he might not have to take away a large number. Now that's a long answer, but I think that's closer to it. Danuta? Danuta Soderman: Well, my question would be, Pat, why didn't He just save them all? I mean, why didn't he say, I forgive you I save you, and save them that way? Why obliterate them? Robertson: A righteous God, just like a righteous judge - if a man comes into court who has committed murder, the judge can't say, "Well I'm a merciful kind of judge , and the jury has found you guilty of premeditated, first degree murder, but I'm such a nice guy, you can just go ahead and I forgive you." He can't do that and uphold the law. They would impeach him. A judge has to keep the law and God has certain laws in the universe which must be upheld. The only way He fulfilled those laws was to die himself in the person of His son on the cross. And he is not going to force anybody to accept him. It has to be a free choice. And they had freely chosen to reject him and it doesn't get any better. It gets worse. =========================== End transcript Two months latter Robertson gave substantially the same answer to a similar question. Even from a believers perspective this is insane. From the book "Salvation For Sale:" " Robertsons writings clearly indicates that removing a tumor or evil before it spreads throughout the whole body of mankind is a high priority for him." And look at what a favorable construction it puts on the Holocaust, at least where the extermination of conversion resistant Jews is concerned. "The statement necessarily implies that whenever evangelization efforts meet with chronic resistance, extermination should follow." --------------------- Comments: Robertsons beliefs are completely inconsistent. First he says it's OK to murder thousands of sinners to prevent them from reproducing (which, by the way, is also like saying sin is more popular than Christianity and hence likely to win out). Then in practically the next breath he says: "And he is not going to force anybody to accept him. It has to be a free choice. And they had freely chosen to reject him and it doesn't get any better. It gets worse." So basically he is saying it is a "free choice" but if you don't choose right, it's OK to commit genocide on you. Right.... Notice too that Pat doesn't believe that God is omnipotent: "A judge has to keep the law and God has certain laws in the universe which must be upheld. The only way He fulfilled those laws was to die himself in the person of His son on the cross." ---- Don't go away, it gets even weirder.... WASHINGTON POST : Sunday, 11 October 1992 "The Robertson Right and the Grandest Conspiracy" by Michael Isikoff -1- The President is the unwitting captive of hostile forces that worship the occult. Secret societies have penetrated elite American institutions and are manipulating public opinion. The ultimate goal: to strip the United States of its constitutional freedoms, destroy the Christian faith and impose the rule of Satan. Is this the plot for one more "Damien" sequel? A Stephen King foray to Washington? In fact, the scenario represents the startling world view of a familiar figure on the American political scene - televangelist, media magnate and former GOP presidential candidate Pat Robertson. In recent months, Robertson has reemerged as an influential player in Republican Party politics. His fledgling, tax-exempt lobbying organization, the Christian Coalition, has seized control of the Republican Party apparatus in a half-dozen states and is spending millions of dollars - working closely with GOP campaign officials to produce a massive vote by evangelical Christians. After last summer's Republican National Convention, where Robertson was a featured speaker and more than 300 Christian Coalition members served as delegates, President Bush chose to pay personal homage to the new power on his right. In September, he flew to Virginia Beach to appear side by side with Robertson before 1,100 cheering, flag-waving, Christian Coalition soldiers at the group's second annual "Road to Victory" conference. Given Robertson's new visibility, some of the more provocative aspects of his Weltanschauung take on a new political importance. There is, for example, his now famous fund-raising letter in Iowa opposing a proposed equal rights amendment to that state's constitution. The amendment, Robertson wrote, was the work of a "secret feminist agenda" that is "not about equal rights for women. It is about a socialist, anti-family political movement that encourages women to leave their husbands, kill their children, practice witchcraft, destroy capitalism and become lesbians." But while the Iowa letter was denounced by women's groups as beyond the pale, Robertson's missive represents a tiny part of the televangelist's increasingly conspiratorial view of world events a view that makes his alliance with Bush even more puzzling. Only last year, Robertson was hinting that Bush may have been selling out the country to a satanic conspiracy bent on taking over the planet. By talking about a "new world order," the televangelist warned, Bush was adopting the secret code words of behind-the-scenes power brokers men, many of them of foreign origin, who have been pulling the strings of U.S. presidents for much of this century. "Indeed," Robertson wrote, "it may well be that men of goodwill like Woodrow Wilson, Jimmy Carter and George Bush... are in reality unknowingly and unwittingly carrying out the mission and mouthing the phrases of a tightly knit cabal whose goal is nothing less than a new order for the human race under the domination of Lucifer and his followers." Robertson's theories about this "tightly knit cabal" were out lined in >The New World Order,< a 1991 book that briefly appeared on the New York Times best-seller list and is now heavily promoted in Christian Coalition publications. According to the book, the plot to impose "a new order for the human race" dates back to 1776, when Bavarian scholar Adam Weisphaut founded the Order of the Illuminati a secret society of "atheists and Satanists" that, Robertson asserts, was dedicated to "the elevation to world leadership of a group of hand-picked 'adepts' or `Illuminati'. Since then, the illumined ones have spread their tentacles, founding or infiltrating such diverse organizations as the Ma sons, the Communist Party, the English Round Table, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Federal Reserve Board, the Trilateral Commission and the New Age movement. How far has their plot reached? Flip over a $1 bill and look at the picture of the Great Seal the one with the pyramid and the glowing eye on top. That, Robertson writes, is "the eye of an ancient Egyptian deity, Osiris, who is revered in the secret high ceremonies and sacred rites of the Masonic Order." Robertson notes that the seal was designed by Charles Thompson, a member of the Continental Congress who was also a Mason, and that the Latin phrase at the bottom, `Novus Ordo Seclorum', can be translated as a "new order for the ages" or a new world order. Robertson's outline provides fresh perspective on the march of history. The Illuminati, he writes, instigated the French Revolution and inspired Marx and Engels to write the "Communist Manifesto." They penetrated the international financial community through the Rothschilds the Jewish banking family who, Robertson says, may be "the missing link between the occult and the world of high finance." Then there was the Lincoln assassination. Robertson believes it was not related to the Civil War per se, but to Lincoln's plans to issue interest-free greenbacks a move opposed by the Illuminati financiers. Although he acknowledges he has no hard evidence, Robertson writes, "it is my belief that John Wilkes Booth . . . was in the employ of the European bankers . . . ." The upshot, to Robertson, is that the Illuminati are more powerful than ever. Much of the media are their "propaganda organs." The Gulf War and the call by Bush (a longtime Council on Foreign Relations member) for a new world order were watershed events, setting the stage for the final "war against the Christian people." To guard against further weakening of our defenses, Robertson advises vigilance against foreign policy advisers "with a foreign accent." "How can anyone who spent most of his life in Germany or Poland fully understand the family life, the shared values . . . and the intense patriotism of people born in Columbus, Ohio?" Robertson's immediate influence on the campaign is hard to measure, but there is little doubt his followers get close attention from the White House. Bush-Quayle campaign documents recently obtained by The Washington Post show that Ralph Reed, executive director of the Christian Coalition, has peppered top campaign officials with strategic advice, including an April 3 letter to senior strategist Charles Black suggesting the selection of Robertson-approved delegates to the GOP convention. A July 14 memo to Bush-Quayle political director Mary Matalin dealt in part with "Pat Robertson's Role in the Campaign." "Mary: Probably a good idea to ask him to do something so he feels involved on a personal level," wrote Reed. Perhaps most significant was a July 15 memo by Bob Heckman, one of the campaign's designated liaisons to the religious right, to his superior, Mimi Dawson, director of coalitions. "The president should avoid using the following phrases," wrote Beckman, including the forbidden words "New World Order." Whether or not Robert son deserves credit, the phrase began to disappear from Bush's vocabulary shortly after Robertson's book was published. Meanwhile, the president's men are sticking by their man in Virginia Beach. Among those at last month's Christian Coalition conference were Lamar Alexander, the secretary of education, and one of his predecessors, William J. Bennett. "Pat Robertson has a right to say what he thinks, say what he believes," said Alexander in remarks that drew thunderous applause. "And I'm glad he does it and I'm glad to be on his side."

---

E-Mail Fredric L. Rice / The Skeptic Tank