Computer underground Digest Sun Nov 27, 1994 Volume 6 : Issue 100 ISSN 1004-042X Editors:

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Computer underground Digest Sun Nov 27, 1994 Volume 6 : Issue 100 ISSN 1004-042X Editors: Jim Thomas and Gordon Meyer (TK0JUT2@NIU.BITNET) Archivist: Brendan Kehoe Retiring Shadow Archivist: Stanton McCandlish Shadow-Archivists: Dan Carosone / Paul Southworth Ralph Sims / Jyrki Kuoppala Ian Dickinson Fruit-loop editor: Carnegie Melon CONTENTS, #6.100 (Sun, Nov 27, 1994) File 1--KnowRight 95 (Intellectual Property Rights Conference) File 2--CHAOS Communication Congress, 1994 File 3--The Cu in the News (Beehive BBS; Fed Virus Laws, & More) File 4--Protect Your Privacy: A Guide for PGP Users (fwd) File 5--CPSR-GLOBAL now moderated File 6--Cu Digest Header Information (unchanged since 25 Nov 1994) CuD ADMINISTRATIVE, EDITORIAL, AND SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION APPEARS IN THE CONCLUDING FILE AT THE END OF EACH ISSUE. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Fri, 18 Nov 1994 10:07:27 -0100 From: PeterPaul.Sint@OEAW.AC.AT(Peter Paul Sint) Subject: File 1--KnowRight 95 (Intellectual Property Rights Conference) FIRST ANNOUNCEMENT & CALL FOR PAPERS International Congress on Intellectual Property Rights for Specialized Information, Knowledge and New Technologies organized by Austrian Computer Society, Austrian national commission for UNESCO, Vienna University of Technology, TermNet sponsored by IFIP - CEPIS - UNIDO - ISO - FID 21 - 25 August 1995 Vienna, Austria AIMS Computer hardware and software technology increasingly allows us to record and process complex information and knowledge simultaneously in various languages and in different forms of representation. The exponential growth of information and knowledge requires more and more sophisticated computer applications including especially technologies, networking and multimedia. In the course of these developments the borderlines between computer hardware (in particular storage media) and software (in particular application software) on the one hand and data, texts and other forms of representation of information and knowledge on the other hand have become blurred. The increasingly unrestricted possibilities to manipulate representations of information and knowledge make it difficult to distinguish clearly between the original and its offspring. Moreover, the transfer of information via information highways will require legal and organizational means to assist the transfer of related rights. Research on and development of information and knowledge systems abound everywhere in the world. New - multilingual - communication media and databases are created which lead to an increased need for new access, retrieval and interaction methods. However, the methodology how to manage complex information structures lags behind the development of information technology itself. In this context the legal provisions concerning the protection of intellectual property rights are still based on traditional hardcopy-oriented technology. New representation methods and technologies are not sufficiently covered by these provisions. Information users and customers may welcome this development claiming that specialized information and knowledge is the intellectual property of all mankind. But the originators of specialized information and knowledge may be highly interested in the utmost protection of their intellectual property. These two diametrically different positions mark the span of attitudes towards the protection of intellectual property rights today. Increasingly, information and knowledge are created in international cooperation networks through the division of labour and shared efforts transcending national borders. National legislation and jurisdiction concerning intellectual property, however, show substantial discrepancies and are equally insufficient everywhere. This calls for harmonization at international level especially addressing European cooperation and also developing countries. Legal measures, however, do not suffice. Technical methods and tools - not to mention ethics - have to contribute to the solution of the problems outlined above. There is definitely the need for a congress with an interdisciplinary and integrative approach at international level dealing with the highly complex and unsatisfactory situation with regard to intellectual property for specialized information and knowledge in order to prepare the grounds for adequate solutions. SECTIONS concern KnowRight Aspects of: Section 1: Knowledge bases, databases, information and communication services - smallest copyright unit(s) - merged elements from various sources - multi-national data and knowledge services - mixed linguistic, numeric, graphical etc. data - user-interface design - bibliographic, factual and text databases - liability problems in knowledge and databases - downloading - which information should be free, subsidized or commercial - data protection and encryption - data manipulation Section 2: Software - basic unit(s) of software protection - software adaptations - copying and pirating - different types of software with different problems - commercial software vs. public domain software, shareware etc. - data protection software - usage fees and superdistribution - regulation for revenue collection via digital money - electronic contracting and licensing - data security software - downloading protection - encryption standards Section 3: Terminology and lexicography - linguistic data intermixed with numeric and non-linguistic data - dictionary data vs. encyclopedic data - terminology and text - multilingual records from various sources - multilingual user-interface design - data safety & security Section 4: Scientific-technical publishing - electronic publishing - database publishing - new media - hypermedia systems - integration of text processing and DBMS data - non-textual information - updating - copyright, security and problems of charging Section 5: Multimedia - digital broadcast and other services - interactive TV - user-interface, TV-Guide - conditional access - need of regulation and harmonization - intellectual property and copyright - consumer protection right Section 6: Graphics and design - graphical elements in texts - images and parts thereof - graphical databases - protection of industrial design - computer games - computer animation - user interface design - picture format copyrights - electronic art INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM COMMITTEE as of 18 May 1994 K. Brunnstein, University Hamburg, Germany (general chair) P. Sint, Austrian Academy of Sciences (general co-chair) M. Straube, Vienna Univ. of Tech., Austria (gen. co-chair) A M. Tjoa, University Vienna, Austria (chair section 1) G. Ertl, Regional Court of Appeal, Austria (chair section 2) Ch. Galinski, Infoterm, Austria (chair section 3) H. Maurer, Graz Univ. of Tech., Austria (chair section 4) C. E. Eberle, ZDF, Mainz, Germany (chair section 5) W. Purgathofer, Vienna Univ. of Tech., Austria (chair section 6) K. Bauknecht, University Zurich, Switzerland J. Berleur, University Namur, Belgium J. Bing, Norway D. Bourcier, Sorbonne, France J. O. Chabot, ISO, Geneva, Switzerland Yi Changhui, CSICCI, Beijing, China W. Dillenz, VDFS, Vienna, Austria A. Djintcharadze, Russia J. Dorner, United Kingdom B. Falcidieno, Italy H. Feldner-Bustin, AKH Vienna, Austria H. Fiedler, University Bonn, Germany S. Fujiwara, Japan H. G rdos, Austrian national commission for UNESCO W. Jaburek, Diebold, Vienna, Austria M. Lauritsen, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA R. Launo, FID, Finland E. Mackaay, Montreal, Canada G. Quirchmayr, University Vienna, Austria V. Risak, Siemens PSE, Vienna, Austria H. Schauer, University Zurich, Switzerland J. Schoenhut, Fraunhofer Institute, Darmstadt, Germany R. Stoeckelle, WSR, Vienna, Austria R. W. Staudt, Kent College, Chicago, USA R. Traunmueller, University Linz, Austria R. Wagner, University Linz, Austria E. Wilmersdorf, MDADV Vienna, Austria E. Wolf, Alcatel Austria K. K. Wolf, Uitikon, Switzerland A. Zampolli, Italy H. Zemanek, Vienna University of Technology, Austria ORGANIZING COMMITTEE W. Grafendorfer (chair), W. Hawlik, I. Sudra, R. Schwarz c/o Austrian Computer Society INTRODUCTORY TUTORIALS AND SEMINARS Tutorials/Seminars are planned on Monday, 21 August 1995 on the following topics: - Graphical Design - Standardization - Patents - New media and multimedia - Cryptography - International communication systems and services CONFERENCE LANGUAGE English EXHIBITION An exhibition of pertinent software, publications and projects will be organized from 21 - 25 August 1995 in conjunction with the congress. INFORMATION FOR AUTHORS AND PARTICIPANTS Please indicate your interest in participating or in submitting a paper by returning the completed preregistration form as soon as possible to: W. Grafendorfer Austrian Computer Society Wollzeile 1-3, A-1010 Vienna, Austria PHONE: +43/1/512 02 35, FAX: +43/1/512 02 35-9 E-MAIL: OCG@VM.UNIVIE.AC.AT DEADLINES: Preregistration: at your earliest convenience. Submission of papers (draft): 13 January 1995 Notification of acceptance: 14 March 1995 Camera-ready copy: 14 April 1995 Further details will be provided following preregistration. PREREGISTRATION FORM KNOWRIGHT 95 Please complete and send back via e-mail I am interested in KnowRight 95 as ( ) Participant ( ) Speaker (please reply as soon as possible) ( ) Conference ( ) Tutorials Section:_____ Preliminary title:______________________________ ________________________________________________ Keywords:_______________________________________ ________________________________________________ ( ) Exhibitor Family Name:_________________________________________ First Name(s):_______________________________________ Acad. Title:_________________________________________ ( ) male ( ) female Institution:_________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ Affiliation:_________________________________________ Address:_____________________________________________ Postal Code:____________City:________________________ Country:_____________________________________________ Telephone:___________________________________________ Fax:_________________________________________________ e-mail:______________________________________________ PeterPaul.Sint@oeaw.ac.at Socio-Economics, Austrian Academy of Sciences Kegelgasse 27 A-1030 Wien, Austria. Phone:(+431) 712 21 40 - 36 Fax: (+431) 712 21 40 - 34 ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 24 Nov 94 20:38:32 GMT From: mixty@ZOMBIE.XS4ALL.NL Subject: File 2--CHAOS Communication Congress, 1994 11. CHAOS COMMUNICATION CONGRESS 1994 "INTERNET IM KINDERZIMMER - BIG BUSINESS IS WATCHING YOU ?!" _________________________________________________________________ oooooooooooooooooooo December 27th-29th in BERLIN $ $ $ $$ $$ "$ $ " o $$ $o """""" """""""""$o"$o$ $o $$ 1994 o$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$"$$o$$$$$o $$ o"" oooooooooooooooooo$$$$$$$$" $$ o$" " o """""$o$$$$ $ o" " $$ $$$"$o$"o$ """ooooooooooooo$$"" "$$$"$o$$" "$$"o$$ Chaos Computer Club $"$ "$$$$$ $ $ $$ WWW URL: o$ o$ http://www.artcom.de/CCC $$o$" ""o$$ E-Mail: $$$ ccc@t42.ppp.de $$ " _________________________________________________________________

For further Infos refer to: the Newsgroup de.org.ccc or our Homepage on the WorldWideWeb in Berlin: CCC Homepage

The Chaos Computer Club invites: 11th Chaos Communication Congress *** B E R L I N *** "Internet in the childrens' room - Big Business is watching you ?!" December 27th to 29th, 1994 in the former art exhibition hall, Berlin, Budapester Str. 42 (opposite the Gedaechtnis-Kirche) ----------------------------------------------------------------- The Chaos Communication Congress, organized by the Chaos Computer Club and traditionally taking place between Christmas and New Year, will this year again be offering a lot of interesting issues for the hitchhikers on the data highway and everybody else. After taking place in Hamburg for 10 years, this year the congress opens itself, in terms of both content and structure, to a larger public, and will be held in the former art exhibition hall, right in the center of Berlin's city, on Breitscheidplatz, opposite the Gedaechtnis-Kirche. Now that computers have turned out to be the most important new medium, questions of conception of this new medium (which will even overtake TV in importance) are gaining more and more social relevance. Terms such as "interactive TV" should contain much more than just a "buy" button on the remote control (which persuades you to buy any product you see in the commercials). To achieve this, visions are needed. Thanks to their self-created, freely accessible computer networks which can offer a lot more speaking of "interactivity", the hackers do not only reach the childrens' rooms in the information society, but also get into difficulties caused by large combines that are more and more regarding the networks as a field of activity. The industry's tending to lay a direct glass fibre connection right into our wallets and the commercialization of information ways involved threatens organizations that have a social interest, such as environmental or human rights organizations, parties, or trade unions, whose aims are not in the first place financial ones. Topical issues, like the demonopolization of the german telephone network and the conception of future network structures, can therefore be found on the program as well as the traditional workshops and hearings. This year, the discussion and analysis of industrial concepts, next to the presentation of own projects and ideas, will be paid special attention to. Under the title "Let me embrace you, millions" workshops and discussions concerning the financial outlook of the electronic networks will be offered. Vebacom? RWE? Who will earn the most out of the glass fibre pipelines with their endlessly flushing greyish gold consisting of bits and bytes? Will anyone be able to afford to take part in free public networks and world-wide communication for individuals, small companies and institutions? This looks like a simple numeric problem, but in reality, it is a socio-political calculation, in which the phrase "knowledge is power" might change to a "You're only supposed to know what you can afford" - freedom of information might become freedom to buy information. The exchange of values via electronic money will also be a subject to examination in some of the many workshops. The actual lifeline of the congress, the information chaos, structured in different workshops, but as well beyond organization, in every hallway and especially the Chaos Cafe, can only be summarized in some topical keywords, such as CD ROM security, phone phreaking and ISDN, secret service recruitments in the german computer & network scene, police raids that occurred at BBS operators' homes during the last year because of "disturbance of the public harmony", legal information about the BTX (german videotext system) providers' possibilities and restrictions, and about the telecommunications law, insecurity of chip cards and the questions resulting from it... Should there not be enough time, the 30th of December will be available for further spontaneous actions. To keep the congress as easy to understand as possible in terms of technical jargon, there will be introductory workshops on some issues, e.g. the Internet. The Hack-center and the data filling stations in every room will be offering the possibility of critical and creative use of technology. For reading and making decentral backup copys, the Chaos Archive will provide a wide range of literature and enough photocopiers. ------------------------------------------------------------ 11th Chaos Communication Congress 1994 ------------------------------------------------------------ December 27th to 29th in Berlin Budapester Str. 42, Berlin (walking distance of 3 minutes from Bahnhof Zoo) ------------------------------------------------------------ 3-day tickets 42.- DM normal 23.- DM members of the CCC e.V. 75.- DM journalists (including a press information leaflet and a detailed congress documentation) 100.- DM commercial price 1-day tickets 20.- DM normal 12.- DM pupils and unemployed persons It is recommended to make a ticket reservation by paying the suitable amount onto the Chaos Computer Club bank account, no. 59 90 90 - 201, Postbank Hamburg (BLZ 200 100 20). Organized by: Chaos Computer Club e.V., Schwenckestr. 85, D-20255 Hamburg Phone +49-40-4903757, Fax +49-40-4917689, BBS +49-40-4911085 In cooperation with: FoeBuD e.V., Marktstr. 18, D-33602 Bielefeld Phone +49-521-175254, Fax +49-521-61172, BBS +49-521-68000 Coordination and press information: Andy Mueller-Maguhn, CCC e.V., Berlin Phone +49-161-2447146, Fax +49-161-880 2708 padeluun, FoeBuD e.V., Bielefeld Phone +49-521-175254, Fax +49-521-61172 _________________________________________________________________ 11. Chaos Communication Congress December 27th-29th in BERLIN The Highlights: _________________________________________________________________ First Day Tue December 27th 1994 Presentation of existing Projects and Networks, Applications, (own) development, online projects, electronic newspapers, WWW, Gopher, introduction to PGP, and Internet for Beginners... _________________________________________________________________ Second Day Wed December 28th 1994 Problems between Technical and Social Issues, Data Security, Encryption, political discussions on Use and Design of Networks, privacy in communication vs. the law? Software prices and PayCD-ROM Security, techno-babble (encryption, Internet, ... ) in several parallel workshops _________________________________________________________________ Third Day Thu December 29th 1994 Life in Global Village: How is it going to look like? Which Datapaths are leading there? international Views, Visions and Visionary Projects _________________________________________________________________ (Day 3.5) Fri December 30th 1994 is free for spontaneous workshops _________________________________________________________________

For further Infos refer to: the Newsgroup de.org.ccc or our Homepage on the WorldWideWeb in Berlin: CCC Homepage

------------------------------ Date: Tue, 22 Nov 94 02:57:00 UTC From: gui.gordon@GENIE.GEIS.COM Subject: File 3--The Cu in the News (Beehive BBS; Fed Virus Laws, & More) Beehive BBS ========== A BBS sponsored by the State of Utah has flooded with users since going online in May. The board averages about 300 calls a day and allows citizens to send email to the governor and state regulators. At first, Governor Michael Leavitt responded to email personally, but that task is now handled by the same folks who respond to paper correspondence. The BBS runs PCBoard software (from Utah-based Clark Development Co.) and is gatewayed with the email system used by the State's employees. In addition to email, citizens can access state job openings, press releases, speeches, and consumer information. The number for the BBS is toll-free throughout the state. (Computerworld. Nov 7, 1994. pg 64) Federal Virus Laws ============== The Clinton Crime Bill makes it illegal to transmit computer viruses and worms over the nation's electronic networks. The law also introduces two levels of computer crime: those taken with "reckless disregard" are misdemeanors, while "intentional" acts are felonies. Other sections of the crime bill prohibit state motor vehicle agencies from selling personal information from their databases. (Computerworld. Oct. 10, 1994. pg 65) Help by Email =========== "The Samaritans", a non-religious charity that offers help to the suicidal and despairing, can now be reached via the Internet. Volunteer counselors respond to mail every day. Send your messages to joe@samaritans.org, or samaritans@anon.penet.fi for anonymous messaging. (Datamation. Oct. 1, 1994 pg 22) Not Our Fault =========== The International Business Association (IBA), a D.C. based trade group, advocates that the same Constitutional standards that apply to booksellers be applied to BBS sysops and information carriers. In other words, just as a bookstore owner is not responsible for the content of the books they sell, neither should a sysop by liable for the contents of their board. (Datamation. Oct. 1, 1994) Fanning the Flames =============== While most people have grown complacent, even amused, at the so-called "virus crisis" the media keeps screaming about, Windows Magazine's Rich Castagna writes that virus writers are still smart, still mean, and still out to get you. He describes the situation as "corporate terrorism" in the making. His column ends with a nice even-handed pitch for all the commercial anti-virus software that is advertised in his magazine. (Windows Magazine. December, 1994. pgs 79 - 82) ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 14 Nov 1994 02:16:47 -0600 (CST) From: David Smith Subject: File 4--Protect Your Privacy: A Guide for PGP Users (fwd) ---------- Forwarded message ---------- Attached is the table of contents and the Foreword by Phil Zimmermann for my book on PGP. It arrived in the publisher's warehouse last Thursday, and should be in bookstores in a few days. It will take longer for the book to be available overseas; the fastest and probably cheapest way to get it is from a US bookstore or distributor such as NCSA (75300.2557@compuserve.com). Protect Your Privacy: A Guide for PGP Users William Stallings (Prentice-Hall, ISBN 0-13-185596-4, $19.95, 300 pages) Table of Contents Foreword by Phil Zimmermann Acknowledgments Reader's Guide to the PGP User's Guide Chapter 1 Protect Your Privacy! Part I HOW PGP WORKS Chapter 2 Basic Principles of PGP Chapter 3 Sending and Receiving PGP Messages Chapter 4 PGP Features Chapter 5 Key Generation and Secret Key Management Chapter 6 Public Key Management Part II USING PGP Chapter 7 DOS PGP: Getting Started Chapter 8 DOS PGP Reference Chapter 9 Macintosh PGP: Getting Started Chapter 10 Macintosh PGP Reference Chapter 11 Windows PGP PART III Supplemental Information Chapter 12 The Building Blocks of PGP Chapter 13 Choosing Your Passphrase Chapter 14 Where to Get PGP Chapter 15 Public Key Servers <<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>> Foreword by Philip Zimmermann This book is about Pretty Good Privacy, a program I created to encrypt e-mail using public key cryptography. PGP was electronically published as free software in 1991. Little did I realize what this project would lead to. PGP has become the worldwide de facto standard for e-mail encryption. I've admired Bill Stallings's writings in computer science for some years before PGP, and here he is writing a book about my program. How can I talk about how great his book is, without, by implication, talking about how great PGP is? It's hard to write a foreword for his book about PGP without sliding into some measure of self-indulgence. I've been so close to this project for so long that I sometimes lose sight of the scope of what PGP provides. I got the manuscript for Bill's book in the mail the other day -- the book you are holding. Sitting down with it, flipping through it, endless pages of diagrams, the formal treatment of it, services provided by PGP. It wasn't till I saw his book on PGP that I could step back and see PGP as others see it. The breadth of it. As a software engineer, I'm used to either documenting my own software, or having a random company tech writer document it. All software engineers get that. But having William Stallings do the manual for your software -- it's sort of like having your portrait done by a world-class artist. There are a very small number of software packages that have far-reaching political implications. Most software that fits in such an influential category has negative effects on our civil liberties. For example, government intelligence agencies use a software package called PROMIS, which is a powerful tool of governments to track people's activities, movements, spending, political affiliations, et cetera. Now that is a piece of software with far-reaching political implications. Mostly bad ones. Then there is the software that the Medical Information Bureau uses to classify people who file medical insurance claims, to put them on a medical "black list", so that they cannot purchase any medical insurance ever again. That software has far-reaching political implications -- enough to raise a large-scale backlash in our society to do something about it. In most cases, it seems that software that has powerful political effects is software designed to strengthen the strong and weaken the weak. But PGP also has far-reaching political implications. Mostly good ones. In the Information Age, cryptography affects the power relationship between government and its people. The Government knows this all too well, as evidenced by their recent policy initiatives for the Clipper chip, which would give the Government a back door into all our private communications -- an Orwellian "wiretap chip" built into all our telephones, fax machines and computer networks. PGP strikes a blow against such dark trends, and has become a crystal nucleus for the growth of the Crypto Revolution, a new political movement for privacy and civil liberties in the Information Age. This government has done all they can to stop the emergence of a worldwide encryption standard that they don't have a back door into. And that same government has placed me under criminal investigation for unleashing this free software on the world. If indicted and convicted, I would face 41 to 51 months in a federal prison. Despite the pressure the Government has brought to bear against PGP (or perhaps because of it), PGP has become the most widely used software in the world for e-mail encryption, used by a variety of activists, and anyone else needing protection from the powerful. It's also used by ordinary people to protect their personal and business communications from prying eyes. PGP may have a future as an official Internet standard, as the Internet Engineering Task Force develops an interest in it. No one who wants to work in the area of Internet e-mail privacy should neglect studying PGP. Because of the "fax machine effect", more people who want to encrypt their e-mail are getting PGP because everyone else who encrypts their e-mail is already using it. Naturally, I want people to read the Official PGP User's Guide, which comes with the electronic distribution package of PGP (also in book form from MIT Press), because I wrote it. Also, I'm more entertaining and personable in my book. And more political. But Bill Stallings' book is more comprehensive than mine, more thorough, covering more detail, with a lot more diagrams. He's really good at completely nailing it down in a book. In fact, I'll probably use his book myself as my preferred reference to PGP. -- | Bill Stallings | PGP key available at | also from Stable | Comp-Comm Consulting | gopher.shore.net | Large Email Database | P. O. Box 2405 | in members/ws | contact | Brewster, MA 02631 | | key@Four11.com ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 2 Nov 1994 16:37:25 -0800 From: email list server Subject: File 5--CPSR-GLOBAL now moderated Join the international conversation: CPSR-GLOBAL is a moderated Listserv for uniting people all over the world who want to talk about: **decisions the USA will make on the information infrastructure, or NII, that will affect the rest of the world--we want the NII to be a positive force for a GII (global information infrastructure) **issues of national identity, "cultural pollution," and international communication and the GII **the new emerging GII world culture **international issues of security and privacy and computer law **international issues of computer development (keyboards, safety) **issues of design **language And whatever other global issues you want to discuss. Right now the list will be predominately in English, because it's the lingua franca of the Net. It is a MODERATED list. That means any posts which are not "on topic" or inflammatory will be filtered out. You can tell our messages because of the (@) in the subject line. To join this discussion write to listserv@cpsr.org with a blank subject and the email command SUBSCRIBE CPSR-GLOBAL Firstname Lastname where Firstname and Lastname are replaced by your first name and last name. YOU DON'T HAVE TO BELONG TO CPSR TO JOIN THE DISCUSSION!!! ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 23 Oct 1994 22:51:01 CDT From: CuD Moderators Subject: File 6--Cu Digest Header Information (unchanged since 25 Nov 1994) Cu-Digest is a weekly electronic journal/newsletter. Subscriptions are available at no cost electronically. CuD is available as a Usenet newsgroup: comp.society.cu-digest Or, to subscribe, send a one-line message: SUB CUDIGEST your name Send it to LISTSERV@UIUCVMD.BITNET or LISTSERV@VMD.CSO.UIUC.EDU The editors may be contacted by voice (815-753-0303), fax (815-753-6302) or U.S. mail at: Jim Thomas, Department of Sociology, NIU, DeKalb, IL 60115, USA. Issues of CuD can also be found in the Usenet comp.society.cu-digest news group; on CompuServe in DL0 and DL4 of the IBMBBS SIG, DL1 of LAWSIG, and DL1 of TELECOM; on GEnie in the PF*NPC RT libraries and in the VIRUS/SECURITY library; from America Online in the PC Telecom forum under "computing newsletters;" On Delphi in the General Discussion database of the Internet SIG; on RIPCO BBS (312) 528-5020 (and via Ripco on internet); and on Rune Stone BBS (IIRGWHQ) (203) 832-8441. CuD is also available via Fidonet File Request from 1:11/70; unlisted nodes and points welcome. EUROPE: from the ComNet in LUXEMBOURG BBS (++352) 466893; In ITALY: Bits against the Empire BBS: +39-461-980493 In BELGIUM: Virtual Access BBS: +32.69.45.51.77 (ringdown) UNITED STATES: etext.archive.umich.edu (192.131.22.8) in /pub/CuD/ ftp.eff.org (192.88.144.4) in /pub/Publications/CuD/ aql.gatech.edu (128.61.10.53) in /pub/eff/cud/ world.std.com in /src/wuarchive/doc/EFF/Publications/CuD/ uceng.uc.edu in /pub/wuarchive/doc/EFF/Publications/CuD/ wuarchive.wustl.edu in /doc/EFF/Publications/CuD/ EUROPE: nic.funet.fi in pub/doc/cud/ (Finland) ftp.warwick.ac.uk in pub/cud/ (United Kingdom) JAPAN: ftp.glocom.ac.jp /mirror/ftp.eff.org/Publications/CuD ftp://www.rcac.tdi.co.jp/pub/mirror/CuD The most recent issues of CuD can be obtained from the NIU Sociology gopher at: URL: gopher://corn.cso.niu.edu:70/00/acad_dept/col_of_las/dept_soci COMPUTER UNDERGROUND DIGEST is an open forum dedicated to sharing information among computerists and to the presentation and debate of diverse views. CuD material may be reprinted for non-profit as long as the source is cited. Authors hold a presumptive copyright, and they should be contacted for reprint permission. It is assumed that non-personal mail to the moderators may be reprinted unless otherwise specified. Readers are encouraged to submit reasoned articles relating to computer culture and communication. Articles are preferred to short responses. Please avoid quoting previous posts unless absolutely necessary. DISCLAIMER: The views represented herein do not necessarily represent the views of the moderators. Digest contributors assume all responsibility for ensuring that articles submitted do not violate copyright protections. ------------------------------ End of Computer Underground Digest #6.100 ************************************

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