Computer underground Digest Sun Aug 2, 1992 Volume 4 : Issue 34 Editors: Jim Thomas and Go

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Computer underground Digest Sun Aug 2, 1992 Volume 4 : Issue 34 Editors: Jim Thomas and Gordon Meyer (TK0JUT2@NIU.BITNET) Copy Editor: Etaion Shrdlu, III Archivist: Brendan Kehoe Shadow-Archivist: Dan Carosone CONTENTS, #4.34 (Aug 2, 1992) File 1--Day (in court) of The Dead File 2--Re: 2600 and Bellcore flap File 3--Another View of Bellcore vs. 2600 File 4--New 2600 and 2600 Meetings File 5--Is Bellcore Guilty of Stealing Copyright Information? File 6--Update on Len Rose File 7--Biblio resource: "Computer Crime" Handbook File 8--Dr Ripco Summarizes his Legal Status since Sun Devil File 9--Documents Available: Open Platform Overview, Life in Virtual File 10--CPSR Recommends NREN Privacy Principles File 11--Biblio resource: "Computer Crime" Handbook File 12--Updated CPSR Archive Listing Cu-Digest is a weekly electronic journal/newsletter. Subscriptions are available at no cost from tk0jut2@mvs.cso.niu.edu. The editors may be contacted by voice (815-753-6430), fax (815-753-6302) or U.S. mail at: Jim Thomas, Department of Sociology, NIU, DeKalb, IL 60115. Issues of CuD can also be found in the Usenet alt.society.cu-digest news group; on CompuServe in DL0 and DL4 of the IBMBBS SIG, DL1 of LAWSIG, and DL0 and DL12 of TELECOM; on Genie in the PF*NPC RT libraries; from America Online in the PC Telecom forum under "computing newsletters;" on the PC-EXEC BBS at (414) 789-4210; and by anonymous ftp from ftp.eff.org (192.88.144.4) and ftp.ee.mu.oz.au European distributor: ComNet in Luxembourg BBS (++352) 466893. COMPUTER UNDERGROUND DIGEST is an open forum dedicated to sharing information among computerists and to the presentation and debate of diverse views. CuD material may be reprinted as long as the source is cited. Some authors do copyright their material, and they should be contacted for reprint permission. It is assumed that non-personal mail to the moderators may be reprinted unless otherwise specified. Readers are encouraged to submit reasoned articles relating to computer culture and communication. Articles are preferred to short responses. Please avoid quoting previous posts unless absolutely necessary. DISCLAIMER: The views represented herein do not necessarily represent the views of the moderators. Digest contributors assume all responsibility for ensuring that articles submitted do not violate copyright protections. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Sun, 26 Jul 92 2:33:02 CDT From: bei@DOGFACE.AUSTIN.TX.US(Bob Izenberg) Subject: File 1--Day (in court) of The Dead >From: Bandit, Shylock and Trackshoes A Kinda Professional Corporation >To: Homo Sapiens Dear Infringing Species, It has come to our attention that you have been utilizing anatomical developments pioneered by several of our clients, the dinosaurs, in your everyday activities. This letter is to notify you that the dinosaurs consider these features to be an infringement of dinosaur development, which has been a documented fact in the scientific community for decades. Said features are proprietary to the dinosaurs, and their duplication represents a substantial harm to the saurian reputation and ability to survive and thrive in a challenging evolutionary climate. This letter is to formally advise you that the process of bipedal locomotion, hereafter called "walking", is an activity the dinosaurs are prepared to demonstrate that they have employed for thousands of years. Continued use of your legs for locomotion on land will be considered actionable. In addition, any evolutionary developments that you may have reason to believe were first present in the dinosaurs must no longer be used by your species. This includes all digestive and reproductive organs, and much of your circulatory system. The dinosaurs will vigorously defend their hard-won evolutionary developments by any and all means available to them, including but not limited to injunctive relief, monetary damages, and gobbling alive, against all members of your species and any evolutionary descendants. We trust that you fully understand the dinosaur position on this matter. Sincerely, BB/file Before you dismiss the imaginary letter above as completely without relevance, consider the Bellcore letter to the editor of 2600 magazine that was recently reprinted in these virtual pages. Also consider the early snarls from AT&T lawyers directed at the authors of the BSD NET2 software distribution. Those authors, you see, have written something much like the UNIX operating system that AT&T markets, and have made the source code for it available for one-tenth the cost of AT&T's version, and, in the case of one version written specifically for the Intel 80386 processor, for free. They have taken the first tentative bites out of the Thunder Lizard's food supply, and the mad, unreasoning blood-lust that overcomes the dinosaur at such moments cannot obscure the handwriting on the cave wall. Of course, the day of the dinosaurs was long gone by the time that our species first trod upon the Earth... but even in this day and age, a fossil living in a museum can still get a good lawyer. The Dead rise up, and are sworn in. It is a shame that the reputation for innovation that once was the hallmark of AT&T and Bellcore has come to be so dominated by lawyers thriving in at atmosphere of comparative technical innocence. The quest for product viability and excellence may not have been abandoned, but in some sectors it has been supplanted by a desire to seal the product up in a black box: A black box that can't be explained, examined, or improved upon... just paid for in perpetuity. ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 25 Jul 92 12:26:17 MDT From: Lazlo Nibble Subject: File 2--Re: 2600 and Bellcore flap > ...Article details how, after following 4 steps, any line is suspectible > to secret monitoring. One document obtained by 2600 said: "There is no > proof the hacker community knows about the vulnerability." They may not have proof of it, but the first time I heard about Busy Line Verification was in '84 or '85 and there's at least one person I knew in the computer underground at the time who I had reason to believe when he said he'd used it. Its existance is certainly no secret to anyone who's messed around with the workings of the phone system -- the codes that activate BLV were (and probably still are) a sort of Holy Grail for telcom hackers. ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 29 Jul 92 14:42 GMT From: "Thomas J. Klotzbach" <0003751365@MCIMAIL.COM> Subject: File 3--Another View of Bellcore vs. 2600 To many, the crux of the controversy seems to be whether or not the internal Bellcore document was legally published in 2600 Magazine. To me, the issue is one far more basic. Mr. Goldstein states that he published the article because it was of "public importance". But were there other goals as well? To embarrass Bellcore? To protect the phone system from degradation caused by inappropriate use? Which goal or goals were the most important? In his response to Mr. Suchyta, he states that "...as journalists, we have a certain obligation that cannot be cast aside...". What is that obligation? Is "...readers, who have a keen interest in this subject matter..." enough of a justification? Or should there be any justification? I believe that Bellcore should be allowed to discover, document and correct the problem internally. If Bellcore was negligent/refused in correcting a known deficiency, that perhaps disclosure of the problem would bring pressure to bear on Bellcore to correct the deficiency. But this was not the case. Bellcore discovered, documented and took steps to correct the problem it would seem, in a timely manner. Also, the problem that Bellcore documents does not appear to be caused as the result of a deliberate, planned action to provide for a "trapdoor". I would ask Mr. Goldstein: - did you verify the source of the document? - did you ascertain how the document was obtained? - did the document contain any markings indicating that it was an internal Bellcore document? - did you weigh the needs of publishing the article versus not publishing the article? I tried to apply an ethical code or standard that would govern MY conduct if I was the person who published a similar article relating to my profession. I referred to the newly proposed revision to the ACM Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct (CACM May '92). I concluded after review with my attorney that a disclosure of a similar type by me would probably be in violation of the ACM Code sections 1.2 (Avoid harm to others), 1.5 (Honor property rights including copyrights and patents - this also deals with unauthorized duplication of materials), 4.1 (Uphold and promote the principals of this Code) and possibly 2.3 (Know and respect existing laws pertaining to professional work). This issue is not solely about computers and technology. It is about "doing the right thing". It's about balancing the need for information versus how that the information is obtained and disseminated. It's about having an ethical standard that treats disclosure for the sake of disclosure and not ensuring that the information is obtained in a method consistent with high ethical standards as deserving of skepticism by the reader. There are those who liken this series of events to "Just one more case of Goliath tromping on those ill equipped to defend themselves". I would respond that if those who are "ill-equipped" to defend themselves publish a document which may have been obtained in an unethical manner and which may infringe on another party's rights, then they should be prepared to face a possible challenge. And as far as "the chilling effect of their (Bellcore's) letter threatening to trample on a free press as well", I would add that we not only need a free press, but a free and RESPONSIBLE press as well. The end does not always justify the means. The First Amendment provides for certain guarantees of freedoms as they relate to assembly, press and speech. It does not unfortunately guarantee common sense and a thorough review of all possible reactions/results of exercising that freedom. Many cloak themselves in the First Amendment words - fewer still cloak themselves in ethical standards that bring credibility to their work and to the causes that they advocate. The Computer Underground must win respect/understanding in all phases of society or it will relegated to a niche in that society. ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 31 Jul 1992 17:58:48 -0700 From: Emmanuel Goldstein Subject: File 4--New 2600 and 2600 Meetings The summer issue of 2600 has been released. Subscribers should have it no later than the early part of next week. Included within is the latest on Bellcore's lawsuit threat against us, as well as a complete guide to the different kinds of telephone signalling systems used throughout the world (written by a real heavyweight in the phone phreak world), a review of the Dutch demon dialer, a tutorial on "portable hacking", tips on defeating call return (*69), a guide to voice mail hacking, plus letters, news updates, revelations of an interesting nature (more Bellcore stuff) plus a whole lot more. On Friday, August 7th, we'll be having meetings in six American cities. We expect all of these meetings to continue on a monthly basis. Please spread the word. NEW YORK: Citicorp Center (between Lexington and 3rd) downstairs in the lobby by the payphones. Payphone numbers: 212-223-9011, 212-223-8927, 212-308-8044, 212-308-8162. WASHINGTON DC: Pentagon City mall. CHICAGO: Century Mall, 2828 Clark St, lower level, by the payphones. Payphone numbers: 312-929-2695, 2875, 2685, 2994, 3287. ST. LOUIS: At the Galleria, Highway 40 and Brentwood, lower level, food court area, by the theaters. LOS ANGELES: At the Union Station, corner of Macy St. and Alameda. Inside main entrance by bank of phones. Payphone numbers: 213-972-9358, 9388, 9506, 9519, 9520, 213-625-9923, 9924, 213-614-9849, 9872, 9918, 9926. SAN FRANCISCO: 4 Embarcadero Plaza (inside). Payphone numbers: 415-398-9803,4,5,6. There is no agenda at a 2600 meeting, no formalities of any kind, no dress code (except maybe in St. Louis), and no constraints other than common sense. People generally get together, trade information, meet people, look for feds, and do whatever else comes to mind (all legally, of course). Each meeting runs approximately from 5 pm to 8 pm local time on the first Friday of the month. Anyone wanting to organize a meeting in another city should contact 2600 at our office: (516) 751-2600. Our voice mail system is now a voice bulletin board system every night beginning at 11 pm Eastern time. You can reach it at 0700-751-2600 through AT&T. If you're using another long distance carrier, preface that number with 10288. It costs 15 cents a minute and all of the money goes to AT&T. Whoopee. Permission is hereby granted to repost this message with the intention of spreading news of the above. ((Moderators' note: 2600 can be contacted at: directly at emmanuel@well.sf.ca.us or 2600@well.sf.ca.us or sub for one year for $21 and mail it to: 2600 Magazine PO Box 752 Middle Island, NY 11953 ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 27 Jul 1991 10:19:51 PDT From: kram@ull.edy.edu Subject: File 5--Is Bellcore Guilty of Stealing Copyright Information? I read about Bellcore's threat against 2600 and wondered why nobody made the connection between Bellcore and the Secret Service raids in 1990. The letter that Bellcore sent to 2600 was in that same petty spirit. Bellcore made some vague threats about an unidentified article that may or may not have been a copyright violation. This is consistent with what they did a few years ago. Bellcore's attempt to intimidate 2600 into silence sounds a bit like the goring ox roaring even before it itself is gored. Bell Communications Research, known as Bellcore, employed Henry M. Kluepfel as a security specialist and David Bauer, a R&D security technoid. Both have testified in hacker trials. Kluepfel was involved in the Sun Devil and earlier investigations. He was on The Phoenix Project bbs, where he routinely logged posts and sent them to the Secret Service. The posters held the copyright, and Kluepfel, a private citizen, took them without authorization or permission. These were proprietary, and Bellcore, through its agent Henry Kluepfel, clearly engaged in a conspiratorial scheme to obtain proprietary information. Release of the information and subsequent use out of context may be a criminal copyright infringement under 17 USC 506. Who can ever forget how those posts were used by the Secret Service to show that the claim that kermit is a 7-bit protocol is obvious evidence of a conspiracy? This led to the unjustified raid on Steve Jackson Games. Given the pattern of Bellcore's paid accomplice to systematically, willfully, and knowingly engage in acts of obtaining proprietary information, the RICO Act (18 USC 1962) might be fun to invoke against Bellcore. If Bellcore considers Emmanuel Goldstein guilty of obtaining proprietary information, then I strongly suggest that the users of The Phoenix Project have an equally valid claim that Bellcore was responsible for stealing copyright material from users. Maybe all ex-Phoenix Project users should send Bellcore some letters. The address listed on the letter to 2600 was Leonard Charles Suchyta LCC 2E-311 290 W. Mt. Pleasant Avenue Livingston, NJ 07039 +++ ((MODERATORS' COMMENT: The above poster refers to The Mentor's BBS, known as The Phoenix Project. Logs and other information taken from TPP were instrumental in justifying the raid on Steve Jackson games. In the Secret Service search affidavit for Steve Jackson Games, Henry Kluepfel was listed as a "source of information." A substantial portion of this information was derived from 17 messages of logs from The Phoenix Project written from Jan. 23 through Jan. 29, 1990. CuD #2.11 includes the complete affidavit and commentary. The reference to a description of Kermit by The Mentor as evidence of his participation in an encryption conspiracy read: >Name: The Mentor #1 >Date: Fri Jan 26 10:11:23 1990 > >Kermit is a 7-bit transfer protocol that is used to transfer >files to/from machines. It is mostly found on mainframes (it's a >standard command on VAX, for instance). Kermit has the added >advantage of being able to work through an outdial (because it is >7-bit). > >Mentor We share the poster's concern with the action of Bellcore's Henry Kluepfel. In that search affidavit, Timothy Foley wrote that Kluepfel indicted that TPP's users' list contained the names of two "hackers" from Illinois' Northern Federal District. To the best of our knowledge (and to the knowledge of those familiar with the users' list during this period), the only two names on it from the Northern District (former US prosecutor William J. Cook's jurisdiction) were the CuD moderators. Given the rather strange logic by which evidence is fabricated by some prosecutors, perhaps Bellcore should first apply to its own employees the same standards of integrity and honesty it expects from others. Because of his actions, Henry Kluepfel was named as a co-defendant in a civil suit brought against him, Bill Cook, Timothy Foley, and others, by Steve Jackson Games in 1991. The litigation, alleging civil rights violations, is still pending. ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 1 Aug 92 23:58:14 PDT From: infogroup@unixville.com Subject: File 6--Update on Len Rose Len Rose was released from the federal penitentiary in South Carolina in March after serving 10 months of a one year sentence for unauthorized possession of Unix sourcecode. He completed the remaining two months in a community release center in Chicago. He is now working in Silicon Valley, and involved in some innovative work. He is working on a project that involves feeding Usenet news and Internet mail onto a satellite which basically provides a full news and mail feed anywhere in continental US. His wife and kids are still living in Chicago, and will hopefully be able to join him soon. He is also doing consulting work in California, so it looks like his life may be back on track. When I recently spoke with Len, he said "... with the exception of my financial condition, I am probably happier than I have ever been .." He also mentioned that he is trying to contact everyone who ever helped him , to say "Thanks" personally, so feel free to send mail to him at: "len@netsys.com" and he will get in touch with you. Perhaps there are happy endings after all. ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 31 Jul 1991 22:15:54 From: Jim Thomas Subject: File 7--Biblio resource: "Computer Crime" Handbook A panel on computer crime, sponsored by the Chicago Bar Association, led to an edited collection of documents, including articles and federal statutes, that provides a helpful resource for those interested in a basic background on crime and computer technology. The volume, in spiral/desktop publishing format, includes a set of "hypotheticals" used for organizing the panel discussion. However, the responses of the panelists (which included William C. Cook, Sheldon Zenner, Robert Gustafson and Bernard P. Zajac, Jr.) were not included. The strength of the work is the appenix, which includes a list of potential violations (matched to their statutes) that may be prosecuted under various federal statutes; Copies of most relevant federal legislation governing recent "hacker" indictments; Comments on selected federal statutes; and reprints of articles from the National Institute of Justice and by John Perry Barlow, Buck BloomBecker, and others. It also includes a David R. Johnson's testimony regarding Senate Bill 2476, and a basic annotated bibliography of books, articles, journals, and other resources as pointers to further information on these issues. The volume is about 150 pages (unpaginated, unindexed) and is available at cost (about $20). For further information, contact Joanna Alperin Chicago Bar Association 321 South Plymouth Court Chicago, IL 60604-3997 ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 29 Jul 1991 17:34:18 CST From: Moderators Subject: File 8--Dr Ripco Summarizes his Legal Status since Sun Devil ((Moderators' note: We asked Dr Ripco to give a detailed summary of all that has changed in his legal status in the past 18 months. Following is his summary of what's changed)). Dear Jim: Sincerely, Dr Ripco +++ ((MODERATORS' NOTE: Dr Ripco's status on 1 August 1992 is identical to his status on May 8, 1990, the morning of the raid by the secret service and others. Although never charged, and although there is to date no evidence that he was involved in any criminal behavior, none of his equipment has been returned, he has not been contacted by law enforcement agents in over two years, he has not heard from attorneys he believed were helping him in the return of his equipment, and he has received no information about when, if ever, he can reclaim his equipment. In short, he has no idea, nor has he been able to learn, what's happening. Kafka's The Trial should be required reading for everybody. ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 20 Jul 1992 13:15:21 -0400 From: Christopher Davis Subject: File 9--Documents Available: Open Platform Overview, Life in Virtual +======+==================================================+===============+ | FYI | Newsnote from the Electronic Frontier Foundation | July 20, 1992 | +======+==================================================+===============+ ELECTRONIC FRONTIER FOUNDATION'S OPEN PLATFORM PROPOSAL AVAILABLE VIA FTP The full text of the EFF's Open Platform Proposal is available in its current draft via anonymous ftp from ftp.eff.org as pub/EFF/papers/open-platform-proposal. To retrieve this document via email (if you can't use ftp), send mail to archive-server@eff.org, containing (in the body of the message) the command 'send eff papers/open-platform-proposal'. This is the proposal in its 4th draft and is up-to-date as of July 2. HOWARD RHINEGOLD'S "VIRTUAL COMMUNITIES, 1992" AVAILABLE VIA FTP This is the full text of Howard Rhinegold's illuminating essay "A Slice of Life In My Virtual Community" that was serialized in EFFector Online. You can retrieve this document via anonymous ftp from ftp.eff.org as pub/EFF/papers/cyber/life-in-virtual-community. To retrieve it via email (if you can't use ftp), send mail to archive-server@eff.org, containing (in the body of the message) the command 'send eff papers/cyber/life-in-virtual-community'. +=====+=====================================================+=============+ | EFF | 155 Second Street, Cambridge MA 02141 (617)864-0665 | eff@eff.org | +=====+=====================================================+=============+ ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 29 Jul 1992 15:27:38 EDT From: Paul Hyland Subject: File 10--CPSR Recommends NREN Privacy Principles PRESS RELEASE July 24, 1992 CPSR Recommends NREN Privacy Principles WASHINGTON, DC -- Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility (CPSR), a national public interest organization, has recommended privacy guidelines for the nation's computer network. At a hearing this week before the National Commission on Library and Information Science, CPSR recommended a privacy policy for the National Research and Education Network or "NREN." Marc Rotenberg, Washington Director of CPSR, said "We hope this proposal will get the ball rolling. The failure to develop a good policy for the computer network could be very costly in the long term." The National Commission is currently reviewing comments for a report to the Office of Science and Technology Policy on the future of the NREN. Mr. Rotenberg said there are several reasons that the Commission should address the privacy issue. "First, the move toward commercialization of the network is certain to exacerbate privacy concerns. Second, current law does not do a very good job of protecting computer messages. Third, technology won't solve all the problems." The CPSR principles are (1) protect confidentiality, (2) identify privacy implications in new services, (3) limit collection of personal data, (4) restrict transfer of personal information,(5) do not charge for routine privacy protection, (6) incorporate technical safeguards, (7) develop appropriate security policies, and (8) create an enforcement mechanism. Professor David Flaherty, an expert in telecommunications privacy law, said "The CPSR principles fit squarely in the middle of similar efforts in other countries to promote network services. This looks like a good approach." Evan Hendricks, the chair of the United States Privacy Council and editor of Privacy Times, said that the United States is "behind the curve" on privacy and needs to catch up with other countries who are already developing privacy guidelines. "The Europeans are racing forward, and we've been left with dust on our face." The CPSR privacy guidelines are similar to a set of principles developed almost 20 years ago called The Code of Fair Information practices. The Code was developed by a government task force that included policy makers, privacy experts, and computer scientists. The Code later became the basis of the United States Privacy Act. Dr. Ronni Rosenberg, who has studied the role of computer scientists in public policy, said that "Computer professionals have an important role to play in privacy policy. The CPSR privacy guidelines are another example of how scientists can contribute to public policy." For more information about the Privacy Polices and how to join CPSR, contact CPSR, P.O. Box 717, Palo Alto CA 94302. 415/322-3778 (tel) and 415/322-3798 (fax). Email at cpsr@csli.stanford.edu. ++++++++++++ [Moderator's note: The full text of the referenced NREN Privacy Principles is available from the CPSR Listserv file server. Send the command: GET NREN PRIVACY to listserv@gwuvm.gwu.edu, as the text of an e-mail message. -peh] ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 31 Jul 1991 22:15:54 EDT From: Jim Thomas Subject: File 11--Biblio resource: "Computer Crime" Handbook A panel on computer crime, sponsored by the Chicago Bar Association, led to an edited collection of documents, including articles and federal statutes, that provides a helpful resource for those interested in a basic background on crime and computer technology. The volume, in spiral/desktop publishing format, includes a set of "hypotheticals" used for organizing the panel discussion. However, the responses of the panelists (which included William C. Cook, Sheldon Zenner, Robert Gustafson and Bernard P. Zajac, Jr.) were not included. The strength of the work is the appenix, which includes a list of potential violations (matched to their statutes) that may be prosecuted under various federal statutes; Copies of most relevant federal legislation governing recent "hacker" indictments; Comments on selected federal statutes; and reprints of articles from the National Institute of Justice and by John Perry Barlow, Buck BloomBecker, and others. It also includes a David R. Johnson's testimony regarding Senate Bill 2476, and a basic annotated bibliography of books, articles, journals, and other resources as pointers to further information on these issues. The volume is about 150 pages (unpaginated, unindexed) and is available at cost (about $20). For further information, contact Joanna Alperin Chicago Bar Association 321 South Plymouth Court Chicago, IL 60604-3997 ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 20 Jul 1992 14:48:39 EDT From: Paul Hyland Subject: File 12--Updated CPSR Archive Listing Following is an updated version of the file CPSR ARCHIVE, which lists the files stored on our Listserv archive. This is the last time that this entire file will be distributed to the list. From now on, I will periodically send mail containing only the updates (add/change/delete). Users can also subscribe to any of our files, and receive either notice or the file itself when it is changed. For information on this and other Listserv File Server features, send the command: INFO LISTFILE The command INFO GENINTRO will provide an introduction to Listserv in general. Questions, comments, or complaints should be directed to phyland@gwuvm.gwu.edu Paul Hyland Owner, CPSR List ****************************************************************************** This file contains a list of files available on the CPSR LISTSERV file server. To request a copy of any file, send mail to the list server: LISTSERV@GWUVM.GWU.EDU (Internet) or LISTSERV@GWUVM (Bitnet) In your mail, send one line per request, using this command for each request: GET The options for and are listed below. For example: GET CPSR BROCHURE Note that LISTSERV is case-insensitive for command and file names. If you have problems with this list, send mail to the administrator, Paul Hyland (phyland@gwuvm.gwu.edu or phyland@gwuvm). =============================================================================== CPSR INFORMATION Filename Filetype Lines Description -------- -------- ----- ----------- CPSR ARCHIVE 213 This file CPSR BROCHURE 300 CPSR overview and membership form ** UPDATED ** CPSR MEMBFORM 53 CPSR membership form (also in brochure) CPSR BOOKS 129 List of CPSR publications and order form CPSR ALIASES 75 CPSR E-mail Aliases @csli.stanford.edu CPSR TEN-YEAR 219 Ten-year history of CPSR, thru spring '91 CPSR PAPERS AND PROJECT DESCRIPT,SCRIPT='SPELL'IONS Filename Filetype Lines Description -------- -------- ----- ----------- 21STCENT PROJECT 287 21st Century Project description - To redirect U.S. Science & Technology Policy toward peaceful and productive uses. PRIVACY PAPER 1550 "Privacy in the Computer Age" by Ronni Rosenberg SUNDEVIL RULING 283 Text of ruling on CPSR FOIA lawsuit seeking Operation Sun Devil search warrant materials CONFERENCE MATERIALS Filename Filetype Lines Description -------- -------- ----- ----------- PDC-92 CALL4PAP 103 Participatory Design Conference Cambridge, MA -- November 6-7, 1992 CRYPTO INTRO 109 2nd CPSR Cryptography and Privacy Conference -- Introduction from conference materials CFP-2 REPORT 808 Report from 2nd Conference on Computers, Freedom and Privacy (CFP-2) -- March, 1992 CFP-2 RADIO 34 CFP-2 radio program available in late JJune CFP-93 CALL4PAP 176 3rd Conference on Computers, Freedom, and Privacy San Francisco, CA -- March 9-12, 1993 DIAC-92 REPORT 219 Report from Directions and Implications of Advanced Computing (DIAC-92) -- May, 1992 CFP2 ANNOUNCE - DELETED CFP2 SHORT - DELETED DIAC-92 ANNOUNCE - DELETED DIAC-92 PROGRAM - DELETED CHI-92 REPORT 79 From ACM SIGCHI (Computer-Human Interaction) CHI '92 session on Social Impact - May, 1992 SIGCSE REPORT 100 From ACM SIGCSE (Computer Science Education) Debate on state licencing of programmers IFAC CALL4PAP 199 International Federation for Automatic Control Symposium on Automated Systems Based on Human Skill (and Intelligence) September 23-25, 1992, Madison, WI MULTIMED CALL4PAP 75 _Journal of Educational Multimadia and Hypermedia_ Special Issue on Multimedia and Hypermedia Learning Environments - Deadline: Sept 15, 1992 SAUDI CALL4PAP 57 13th National Computer Conference and Exposition Topic: Information Technology Transfer Riyadh, Saudi Arabia - Nov. 21-26, 1992 TECHSTUD CALL4PAP 351 _Technology Studies_ Special Issue on Technology and Ethics - Deadline: January 15, 1993 EMC-93 CALL4PAP 161 Society for Computer Simulation - International Emergency Management and Engineering Conference, Arlington, VA -- March 29 - April 1, 1993 IFIP CALL4PAP 33 International Federation for Info. Processing Working Gp 9.2 (Social Accountability of Computers) Working conference - `Facing the Challenge of Risk and Vulnerability in an Information Society' May 20-22, 1993, Namur, Belgium ED-MEDIA CALL4PAP 353 World Conference on Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, Orlando FL, June 23-26, 1993 EASTWEST ANNOUNCE - DELETED COLLAB92 ANNOUNCE - DELETED CPSR ON-LINE NEWSLETTERS Filename Filetype Lines Description -------- -------- ----- ----------- CPSRBERK 2Q92 425 CPSR/Berkeley Electronic Newsletter Second Quarter - 1992 CPSR-PDX VOL5-N02 258 CPSR/Portland Electronic Newsletter *new name* Volume 5, #02, April 1, 1992 CPSR-PDX VOL5-N03 488 CPSR/Portland Electronic Newsletter *new name* Volume 5, #03, May 26, 1992 CPSR-PDX VOL5-N04 531 CPSR/Portland Electronic Newsletter *new name* Volume 5, #04, June 8, 1992 CPSR-PDX VOL5-N05 819 CPSR/Portland Electronic Newsletter Volume 5, #05, June 23, 1992 CPSR-PDX VOL5-N06 612 CPSR/Portland Electronic Newsletter Volume 5, #06, July 13, 1992 E-MAIL DIRECTRY 625 CPSR/PDX E-mail Directory of CPSR addresses and other interesting lists - August 22, 1991 *renamed and updated* LEGISLATIVE MATERIALS Filename Filetype Lines Description -------- -------- ----- ----------- BOS-CNID SHORT 122 Testimony by CPSR/Boston on Calling Number ID before Mass. DPU - Oral version BOS-CNID LONG 396 Testimony by CPSR/Boston on Calling Number ID before Mass. DPU - Written version CAL-CNID HEARING 299 Testimony by CPSR/Palo Alto and description of hearing before California State Assembly on CNID FBITAP PROPOSAL 445 Updated (and renamed) FBI Digital Telephony Proposal, to force telco's to enable FBI taps of the evolving digital network (with an introduction by Dave Banisar of CPSR) FBITAP LETTER 127 Letter from CPSR and others to Senator Leahy urging a public hearing of this FBI proposal FBITAP COMPWRLD 130 Article on FBI Proposal in Computerworld 6/8/92 SEMATECH ENVIRO 118 Press Release from Campaign for Responsible Technology on environmental funding in SEMATECH reauthorization legislation SEMATECH AMENDMNT 222 Press Release from Campaign for Responsible Technology on proposed amendment to SEMATECH authorization to address environmental, community and labor concerns SB1447 BILL 1 California Senate Bill 1447 - Privacy Act of 1992 (obsolete version deleted - revision expected) HR2772 BILL 85 GPO Wide Information Access Network for Data Online Act of 1991 (GPO WINDO Bill) HR2772 FACTS 95 Taxpayer Assets Project Fact Sheet on GPO WINDO S2813 BILL 151 GPO Gateway to Government Act of 1992 (Senate version of WINDO) HR3459 BILL 136 Improvement of Information Access Act of 1991 (Owens Bill) HR3459 FACTS 65 Taxpayer Assets Project Fact Sheet on Owens Bill OMB-A130 COMMENTS 178 Taxpayer Assets Project Note on the Proposed Revisions to OMB Circular A-130 concerning Management of Federal Information Resources with info on how to obtain the document and provide comments electronically (due 8/27/92) EDGAR RELEASE 323 Taxpayer Assets Project Press Release on letter to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) asking that they broaden access and improve control over the Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis and Retrieval System (EDGAR) S1940 BILL 145 Electronic Freedom of Information Improvement Act of 1991 HPC ACT 636 High Performance Computing Act of 1991 Signed December 9, 1991 CRYPTO ARTICLE 217 Article on Government attempts to control spread of cryptographic technology into the telephone network -- Joe Abernathy, Houston Chronicle NSA PAPERS 439 Response from NSA to Joe Abernathy questions on their attempts to control or hinder civilian cryptographic technology HR5615 BILL 144 Prescription Drug Records Privacy Protection Act of 1992 CANADIAN PRINCIPL 90 Canadian Telecommunication Privacy Principles ONLINE RESOURCES AND OTHER MATERIALS Filename Filetype Lines Description -------- -------- ----- ----------- RTK-NET SRCHFORM 136 RTK NET -- the Right-to-Know Computer Network -- Introduction and on-line search request form PRIVACY LISTS 152 Information on two new privacy-related lists RISKS SAMPLE 541 Sample Issue of RISKS Digest - Volume 13, # 59 CUD SAMPLE 995 Sample Issue of Computer underground Digest - Volume 4, # 26 EFFECTOR SAMPLE 597 Sample Issue of EFFector Online - Volume 2, # 01 EMAILPRV BIBLIO 136 Bibliography of materials on E-mail Privacy PRIVACY PROJECT 44 Tapes from the Privacy Project radio series Available from Pacifica Programming Service TEACHING VALUES 28 Describes "Teaching Social and Ethical Implications of Computing: A Starter Kit" from the Research Center on Computing and Society at Southern Connecticut State Univ. and Educational Media Resources, Inc. VIRTREAL GENIE 472 Genie On-Line Conference on Virtual Reality Howard Rheingold (Whole Earth Review) - 5/3/92 (from the Public Forum * Non-profit Connection) CYBEPUNK GENIE 480 Genie On-Line Conference on Networks and Hackers Katie Hafner (co-author, CYBERPUNK) - 5/24/92 DHIGHWAY GENIE 722 Genie On-Line Conference on Data Highways Steve Cisler (Aplle Computer) - 5/17/92 MAIL MANNERS 150 Describes proper e-mail etiquette NSF JOBS 64 Two jobs with NSF Information Tech. Programs MONTHLY ARCHIVES OF CPSR LIST SUBMISSIONS Filename Filetype Lines Description -------- -------- ----- ----------- CPSR LOG9110 158 From list start-up through 10/91 CPSR LOG9111 674 From prior log through 11/91 CPSR LOG9201 1619 From prior log through 1/92 CPSR LOG9202 305 From prior log through 2/92 CPSR LOG9203 1539 From prior log through 3/92 CPSR LOG9204 866 From prior log through 4/92 CPSR LOG9205 91 From prior log through 5/92 CPSR LOG9206 2192 From prior log through 6/92 CPSR LOG9207 96 From prior log through 6/92 ------------------------------ End of Computer Underground Digest #4.34 ************************************

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