1. How could a canopy of water sufficient to cause the flood be held aloft (unless they ha

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> 1. How could a canopy of water sufficient to cause the flood be > held aloft (unless they had invented AntiGrav devices) > The physics behind this is quite simple. Temperature gradients > produce gaseous flux. If the temperature gradient is large > enough, great quantities of vapor can be kept in the atmosphere. > Scientists at the Institute for Creation Research have used the > same computer codes used to simulate the behavior of the > atmosphere by meteorolical researchers and have shown that a > canopy that contains more than enough water to cover the earth > can stay suspended in the atmosphere. This is fascinating. Has it been published in a peer-reviewed journal? I'd love to read the paper. However, I have some serious concerns about this claim. Not about the claim that the ICR researchers have obtained the result they want from the computer codes; I know from experience how easy it is to get garbage out of these codes. What one usually does to check the validity of results is to see whether they make sense. Now, let's assume that enough water to cover the Earth to a depth of, say, 2000 feet were suspended in the atmosphere. This is far less than required for the Flood, but I'm feeling generous tonight. The total weight of the air above the Earth results in the pressure at the Earth's surface, which is about 15 psi; thus, for each square inch, there is approximately 15 pounds of air between the surface of the Earth and space. (The gravitational gradient has some effect, but it is a relatively small correction). The weight of a 2000-foot column of water one square inch in cross-section is about 865 pounds. Thus, if this entire volume of water were suspended in the atmosphere, the pressure at the Earth's surface would be approximately 880 psi! If this isn't ridiculous enough, one can calculate the composition of the atmosphere pretty easily. The molecular weight of water is 18, while that of air is about 27 or 28. This means that the atmosphere would be more than 99% water vapor, with nitrogen and oxygen only trace gases. Kinda hard to breathe, don't you think? Now, let's do the problem the other way, and ask how much water the atmosphere reasonably (or even unreasonably) _could_ hold. If we assume that the weight of water the atmosphere can support is equal to the weight of the atmosphere, then you could get 15 psi of water, which translates to a column of water about 32 feet high. Are you seriously claiming that 32 feet of water would be enough to cover the Earth? ================================================================ >If the temperature gradient is large enough, great quantities >of vapor can be kept in the atmosphere. Scientists at the Institute for >Creation Research have used the same computer codes used to simulate the >behavior of the atmosphere by meteorolical researchers and have shown that >a canopy that contains more than enough water to cover the earth can stay >suspended in the atmosphere. Some original work was done on this in the late 1970s by John C. Dillow, whose Ph.D. thesis later appeared as _The Waters Above_, Moody Press, 1981. Dillow assumed that his canopy contained enough water to flood the earth to 40 feet, which would have a bit more than doubled atmospheric pressure. Dillow's key finding was that this canopy was *unstable*. If by some miracle of initial creation God had put this canopy in place, Dillow concluded that it could last only a few thousand years. I suspect that it would last only a few days. This has been the downfall of the more recent ICR attempts at modelling a vapor canopy -- the instability is fatal. This is why even they have not published anything even they consider definitive. To show how little these people know of physics, Henry Morris suggested, in _The Genesis Flood_, that the reason a vapor canopy could be supported is that the temperature of the atmosphere at 80 miles is about 3,000 F. He forgot that the reason the air is so hot is that it's the absorbing region for ultraviolet. It's also extremely tenuous. Morris here was either extremely dense, or deliberately dishonest -- take your pick.

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