Farewell to Ansteorra Music - Farewell to Nova Scotia Words - Alaric ap Morgan Chorus - Fa

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Farewell to Ansteorra Music - Farewell to Nova Scotia Words - Alaric ap Morgan Chorus |--------------------------------------------------| | Farewell to Ansteorra, that sun-blessed land! | | Let your hamlets bright and cheery be! | | When I am far away, over mighty mountains tall, | | Will you ever heave a sigh or a wish for me. | |--------------------------------------------------| I hate to leave my native home, I loathe to leave my comrades all. But I must hie away over hill and plain, For my captain calls, and I must obey. CHORUS My own true love did bid me stay, She would not part our company, But honour calls "To horse and away!" For no slight shall mar our Kingdom free. CHORUS Red war does cry on every side Our swords are broken, bent or dulled But Ansteorra stands as a shield in the sun, And Honour and Glory shall e'er be our pride. CHORUS (Slowly) I lay me down this night to die My wounds are grievous, I've greatly bled, But Ansteorra's life means more than mine, For Love and Beauty must ne'er wash away. CHORUS (slowly and wistfully) (Optional, CHORUS, with excitement! ) SONG Circles By: Gwen Zak Moore, probably in mid 1970's. Tune: Windmills, by Alan Bell In days gone by, when the world was much younger Men wondered at spring, born of winter's gold knife Wondering at the games of the moon and sunlight, They saw there the Lady and Lord of all life. CHORUS |------------------------------------------------------------- | And around and around and around turns the good earth | | All things must change as the seasons go by, | | We are the children of the Lord and the Lady, | | Whose mysteries we know but we'll never know why. | |------------------------------------------------------------| In all lands the people were tied with the good earth Plowing and sowing as the seasons declared Waiting to reap of the rich golden harvest Knowing Her laugh in the joys that they shared. CHORUS Through Flanders and Wales and the green land of Ireland In Kingdoms of England and Scotland and Spain Circles grew up all along the wild coastline And worked for the land with the sun and the rain. CHORUS Circles for healing and working the weather Circles for knowing the moon and the sun Circles for thanking the Lord and the Lady Circles for dancing the dance never done CHORUS And we who reach for the stars in the heavens Turning our eyes from the meadows and groves Still live in the love of the Lord and the Lady The greater the Circle the more the love grows CHORUS (two times) Page 3 SONG The Rising of the Star Tune: The Rising Of The Moon Oh, now tell me folk in Atenveldt, now have ye heard it said, That the sun upon your banner has now turned to bloody red? We're comin' from the Southlands, ye don't know who we are. We're the folk from Ansteorra by the rising of the Star! Oh, now many a foe has tried us, on many a bloody field, But precious few have killed us, because we never yield. We've got powder for our cannons, grape shot, and boilin' tar. We're your friends from Ansteorra by the rising of the star! Now, the Ansteorran summers are seven months in length. The rivers lose their waters and the fighters lose their strength. With swooning in the tourney, and fainting in the war, We long for cool November by the rising of the Star! Now, the Ansteorran ladies will make ye lovely wives, But check their skirts and bodices, they always carry knives! They say this iron-mongery their beauty will not mar, They'll thrill you or they'll kill you by the rising of the Star! Oh, the Ansteorran children are ever so polite, Don't turn your backs upon them 'cause the little buggers bite! Their cunning none surpasses, you know that they'll go far, They're the heirs of Ansteorra, by the rising of the Star! Now, the bards of Ansteorra are very long of wind, Their verses have no rhythm and their stories never end. A tune they cannot carry in a bucket or a jar, But they'll revel until daylight and the rising of the Star! Oh, we're just psychotic killers, we like to maim and gunch, Don't pack us any baskets, we'll just eat your dead for lunch! We're brothers of the Normans and daughters of the Czars, We're your friends from Ansteorra by the rising of the Star! ( I have seen this printed in many place. Only one gives credit for the words, so I'm not sure if it is correct. The name is Balthazar of Endo. ) Page 4 SONG The Bonny Black Hare On the fourteenth of May, At the dawn of the day, With me gun on my shoulder, To the woods I did stray, In search of some game, If the weather proved fair, To see could I get a shot At the bonny black hare. Well I met a young girl, With the face of a rose. And her skin was as fair As the lily that grows. I says "Tell me, fair maiden, Why ramble you so? Can you tell me where the bonny Black hare do go?" And the answer she gave me, Her answer was, "No, But it's under me apron That they say it do go. And if you'll not deceive me, I'll vow and declare, That we'll both go together Toward the bonny black hare." Well, I lay this girl down, With her face to the sky, And I pulls up me ramrod, And me bullets likewise. I says, "Lock your legs 'round me And dig in with your heels, For the closer we get, love, The better it feels." Page 5 The Bonny Black Hare SONG (continued) Now the birds, they were singin', In the bushes and trees. And the song that they sang Is "She's easy to please!" And I felt her heart quiver, And I knew what I'd done. Says I, "Have you had enough, Of me old sportin' gun.?" And the answer she gave me, Her answer was, "Nay, For it's not often young sportsmen Like you come my way. Now if your powder be willin' And your bullets fly fair, Why don't you keep firin' At the bonny black hare. Now, me powder is wasted, Me bullets all gone. Me ramrod is limber, I cannot fire on. But I'll be back in the mornin', And if you are still here, We'll both go together, Towards the bonny black hare. Page 6 SONG Men of the Picts By Rudyard Kipling Music by Leslie Fish (Tape: Cold Iron) Rome never heeds where she treads. Always the heavy hooves fall On our stomachs, our hearts and our heads. And Rome never heeds when we bawl. The sentries pass on, that is all. And we gather behind them in hordes, And plot to reconquer the Wall With only our tongues for our swords. We are the little folk, we. Too little to love or to hate. But leave us alone and you'll see Just how we can drag down the State. We are the worm in the wood, We are the rot at the root, We are the taint in the blood, We are the thorn in the foot! Mistletoe choking an oak, Rats gnawing cables in two, Moths making holes in a cloak, How they must love what they do. Yes, and we little folk too! We are as busy as they, Working our works out of view. But watch, and you'll see them someday. No, indeed we are not strong. But we know people who are! And we, we will guide them along To crush and destroy you in war. Yes, we have always been slaves, And, yes, we will still be their slaves. But you, you will die of the shame. And then we will dance on your graves. ( finish quietly, whispering the last line. ) We are the little folk, we. Too little to love or to hate. But leave us alone and you'll see Just watch as we drag down the State. SONG Three Jolly Coachmen Three jolly coachmen Sat at an english Tavern Three jolly coachmen Sat at an english Tavern And they decided, And they decided, And they decided, To have another flagon. CHORUS |------------------------------------| | Landlord fill the flowing bowl | | 'Til it doth run over. | | Landlord fill the flowing bowl | | 'Til it doth run over. | | | | For tonight 'tis merry I'll be, | | For tonight 'tis merry I'll be, | | For tonight 'tis merry I'll be, | | Tomorrow I'll be sober. | |------------------------------------| Here's to the man who drinks dark ale, And goes to bed quite mellow. Here's to the man who drinks dark ale, And goes to bed quite mellow. Lives as he ought to live, Lives as he ought to live, Lives as he ought to live, And dies a jolly fellow. CHORUS Here's to the man who drinks light ale, and goes to bed quite sober. ... Falls as the leaves do fall, ... He'll die before October. CHORUS Here's to the maid who steals a kiss, And runs to tell her mother. ... Does a very foolish thing. ... For she'll not get another. CHORUS (Continued) Page 8 Three Jolly Coachmen ( continued ) SONG Here's to the maid who steals a kiss, and stays to steal another. ... She's a boon to all mankind. ... For soon she'll be a mother. CHORUS Here's to the lad who steals a kiss, and runs to tell his brother. ... Does a very foolish thing, ... For brother gets another. CHORUS Page 9 SONG Johnny Be Fair : Author Unknown Oh, Johnny be fair and Johnny be fine and wants me for to wed. And I would marry Johnny but me father up and said, "I'm sad to tell you, daughter, what your mother never knew, But Johnny is a son of mine, and so is kin to you." Oh, Robin be fair, and ..... Oh, Sean be fair, and ..... ( Change names as needed, repeat as many times as you want. ) You never saw a girl so sad and sorry as I was, The boys in town are all my kin and my father is the cause. If life should thus continue I will die a single miss, So I will go to Mother and complain to her of this. "Well, daughter, haven't I taught you to forgive and to forget, And if your father sowed his oats, well, still you needn't fret. Your father may be father to all the boys, but still, He's not the one who sired you, so marry who you will." Page 10 SONG Bonnie Bonnie Banks of the Virgio Three sisters walked out one fine day, All the lee and the lonely-o, Met a robber on the way, On the bonnie, bonnie banks of the Virgio. He took the first one by the hand, All the lee and the lonely-o, He whipped her 'round and he made her stand, On the bonnie, bonnie banks of the Virgio. Oh, will you be a robber's wife, All the lee and the lonely-o, Or will you die by my pen-knife, On the bonnie, bonnie banks of the Virgio. Oh, I'll not be a robber's wife, All the lee and the lonely-o, And so I'll die by your pen-knife, On the bonnie, bonnie banks of the Virgio. And so he took his wee pen-knife, All the lee and the lonely-o, And there he took her own dear life, On the bonnie, bonnie banks of the Virgio. (- Repeat for second sister. -) (- Then, repeat for Third, until her answer, which is below. -) Oh, I'll not be a robber's wife, All the lee and the lonely-o, And I'll not die by your pen-knife. On the bonnie, bonnie banks of the Virgio. For you have killed my sisters dear, All the lee and the lonely-o, You wouldna' have done that if me brother was here, On the bonnie, bonnie banks of the Virgio. Oh, tell me what does your brother do, All the lee and the lonely-o, Why, he's a robber just like you. On the bonnie, bonnie banks of the Virgio. Oh, my God, what have I done, All the lee and the lonely-o, I've killed my sisters, all save one, On the bonnie, bonnie banks of the Virgio. And so he took his wee pen-knife, All the lee and the lonely-o, And there he took his own dear life, On the bonnie, bonnie banks of the Virgio. Page 11 SONG The Kingdom Hall By: Lady Catrin ferch Gwillym written during her term as Premiere Bard of Ansteorra Oh, tell me, my brother, whither are you bound? Upon this fair and sunny day what way have you found? I'm going to the boundless sweeps of Ansteorra's plain To fight for lady's honor and to win a hero's fame. We'll fight and die while the sun is high and heed the martial call And make our way when day is done unto the Kingdom Hall. REFRAIN And there'll be music and dancing, Bardic tales, romancing, Revelry to make the rafters ring, There'll be dicing and laughter, now and ever after At the Kingdom Hall of Ansteorra. Oh, tell me, dearest sister, upon what road you go? The harvest moon is full tonight for autumn winds to blow. I'm going where the clanfolk meet upon the Samhain Eve Where ancient spirits yet can rise if you will just believe. We'll praise the Rising of the Star and never will it fall While Ansteorra's children here can raise the Kingdom Hall. Oh, say to me, my dearest one, how can you hope to fare? The sky is grey and full of cloud and snow is in the air. I'm going to a bonny land where voices join in song To drive the winter's chill away and you can come along. A winter's feast to light the night and merriment for all As loving hearts beat joyfully within the Kingdom Hall. Oh, wait for me, my family, my friends, and lover true. How can I go where you are bound and tread the road you do? Well, sister, shed your weary ways and come and join the dance We make the magic new again that ever will entrance. The gift is freely given or is given not at all, A place in loving brotherhood within the Kingdom Hall. And there is music and dancing, Bardic tales, romancing, Revelry to make the rafters ring. There is wisdom and glory, may they ever tell the story Of the Kingdom Hall of Ansteorra. Page 12 Men Of Harlech SONG See the glares of fire like hell there, Tongues of flame that writhe and swell there. Brave men strike with full-voiced yell there: Forward with all might. Armor clashing, cries of foemen, Hear the chieftains urgin' "On men!" Thunder of the charging horsemen Echo height on height. Arfon sings for ever Of her might and glory. Wales will be as Wales has been, So great in freedom's story! Those fires light up the sacrifices; Cry of a dying Welshman rises. In the cause of freedom's crisis Bravest men must fight. We'll not die, be conquered never. Harlech, Harlech lives for ever Freedom's from the Greatest Giver, Freedom is our good. See how Welshmen shouting run down From the mountains they do come down Like a storm that strikes at sundown Boil up like a flood. Welshmen's strength has made her Freedom's strong crusader. Swords of Welshmen have cut deep The hearts of the invader. The sword is met by sword replying, Steel by steel on strength relying; See where Gwalia's flag is flying, Freedom's in her blood! Hark! I hear the foe advancing Barbed steeds are proudly prancing; Helmets, in the sunbeams glancing, Glitter through the trees. Men of Harlech, lie ye dreaming? See ye not their falchions gleaming, While their pennons gaily streaming Flutter in the breeze? From the rocks rebounding, Let the war-cry sounding Summon all at Cambria's call, The haughty foe surrounding. Men of Harlech, on to glory! See your banner famed in story Waves these burning word before ye, "Britain scorns to yield!" (continued) Page 13 Men Of Harlech (continued) SONG 'Mid the fray, see dead and dying, Friend and foe together lying; All around the arrows flying Scatter sudden death! Frightened steeds are wildly neighing, Brazen trumpets hoarsely braying, Wounded men for mercy praying With their parting breath! See---they're in disorder! Comrades, keep close order! Ever they shall rue the day They ventured o're the border! Now the Saxon flees before us; Victory's banner floateth o'er us! Raise the loud, exalting chorus: "Britain wins the field!" Men of Harlech, in the hollow Do ye hear like rushing billow Wave on wave that surging follow Battle's distant sound? 'Tis the tramp of Saxon foemen, Be they knights or hinds or yeomen, They shall bite the ground. Loose the folds asunder! Flag we conquer under! The placid sky, now bright on high, Shall launch it's bolts in thunder! Onward, 'tis our country needs us! He is bravest he who leads us, Honor's self now proudly heeds us--- Freedom, God, and Right! (continued) Page 14 Men Of Harlech (continued) SONG Rocky steeps and passes narrow Flash with spear and flight of arrow. Who would think of death or sorrow--- Death is glory now! Hurl the yelling horsemen over, Let the earth dead foemen cover. Fate of friend, of wife, of lover Trembles of a blow! Strands of life are riven. Blow for blow is given, In deadly lock or battle shock And mercy shrieks to Heaven! Men of Harlech, young or hoary, Would you win a name in story? Fight for home, for life, for glory, Freedom, God, and Right! Translated from the Welsh by: Verses 1, 2: Peter John Stephens Verses 3, 4: Thomas Oliphaunt Verses 5, 6: William Duthie Page 15 SONG Lusty Young Smith (This is the version common in Ansteorra.) A lusty young smith at his vice stood a-filing. His hammer lay by but his forge still a-glowed. When to him a buxom young damsel came smiling, And asked if to work, in her forge, he would go. CHORUS |-----------------------------------------------------| | With a jingle bang jingle bang jingle bang jingle. | | With a jingle bang jingle bang jingle high ho. | |-----------------------------------------------------| I will, said the smith, and they went off together, Unto the young damsel's forge they did go. They stripped to go to it, 'twas hot work and hot weather. She kindled the fire and she soon made him glow. CHORUS Her husband, she said, no good work could afford her. His strength and his tools were worn out long ago. The smith said, Well, mine are in very good order, And I am now ready my skill for to show. CHORUS Red hot grew his iron, as both did desire, And he was too wise not to strike while 'twas so. She said, What I get I get out of the fire, So prithee, strike home and redouble the blow. CHORUS Six times did his iron, by vigorous heating, Grow soft in her forge in a minute or so, And ere it were hard and yet heating and beating, But the more it were soft, it did harden more slow. CHORUS The smith then would go, left the maid full of sorrow. Oh, what would I give could my husband do so. Good lad with your hammer come hither tomorrow, And pray won't you use it once more ere you go! CHORUS Page 16 SONG Lusty Young Smith This version I found in "Bawdy Verse, A Pleasant Collection." (ante 1700.) A lusty young smith at his vice stood a-filing. Rub, rub, rub, rub, rub, rub in and out, in and out ho! When to him a buxom young damsel came smiling, And asked if to work at her forge, he would go. With a rub rub rub rub rub, rub in and out In and out, ho! "A match" quoth the Smith, so they went away thither. Rub, rub, rub, rub, rub, rub in and out, in and out ho! They stripped to go to it, 'twas hot Work and hot Weather. She kindled a Fire and soon made him blow. With a rub rub rub rub rub, rub in and out In and out, ho! Her husband, she said, could scarce raise up his Hammer, His strength and his Tools were worn out long ago. If she got her Journeymen, could any blame her? "Look here!" quoth our Workman, "my Tools are not so." With a rub rub rub rub rub, rub in and out In and out, ho! Red-hot grew his Iron, as both did desire, And he was too wise not to strike while 'twas so. Quoth she "What I get, I get out of the Fire, So prithee strike Home and redouble the blow!" With a rub rub rub rub rub, rub in and out In and out, ho! Six times, did his Iron, by vigorous heating Grow soft in the Forge in a minute or so; As often 'twas hardened, still beating and beating, But the more it was softened, it hardened more slow. With a rub rub rub rub rub, rub in and out In and out, ho! The Smith would then go. Quoth the Dame, full of sorrow "O! What would I give could my Cuckold do so! Good Lad, with your Hammer, come hither tomorrow; But pray! can't you use it once more ere you go?" With a rub rub rub rub rub, rub in and out In and out, ho! Page 17 SONG Greensleeves (Version One) Alas my love, you do me wrong To cast me off discourteously, And I have loved you so long, Delighting in your company. CHORUS: (repeat after each verse) |---------------------------------------| | Greensleeves was all my joy, | | Greensleeves was my delight; | | Greensleeves was my heart of gold, | | And who but Lady Greensleeves? | |---------------------------------------| I have been ready at your hand, To grant whatever you would crave; I have both waged life and land, Your love and good will for to have. I bought thee kerchiefs for thy head, That were wrought fine and gallantly; I kept thee both at board and bed, Which cost my purse well favoredly. I bought thee petticoats of the best, The cloth so fine as fine might be; I gave thee jewels for thy chest, And all this cost I spent on thee. Thy smock of silk, both fair and white, With gold embroidered gorgeously, Thy petticoat of Sendall right, And this I bought thee gladly. Thy girdle of the gold so red, With pearls bedecked sumptuously, The like no other lasses had, And yet thou wouldst not love me. Thy purse and also thy gay gilt knives, Thy pincase gallant to the eye; No better wore the Burgesse wives, And yet thou wouldst not love me. Thy crimson stockings all of silk, With gold all wrought above the knee, Thy pumps as white as was the milk, And yet thou wouldst not love me. Thy gown was of the glossy green, Thy sleeves of satin hanging by, Which made thee be our Harvest Queen, And yet thou wouldst not love me. Page 18 Greensleeves SONG (Version Two) (Sorry, but I don't know the history behind either of these.) Alas my love, you do me wrong To cast me off discourteously, And I have loved you so long, Delighting in your company. CHORUS: (repeat after each verse) |---------------------------------------| | Greensleeves was all my joy, | | Greensleeves was my delight; | | Greensleeves was my heart of gold, | | And who but My Lady Greensleeves? | |---------------------------------------| Thou canst desire no Earthly thing But still thou hadst it readily Thy music still I play and sing And yet thou wouldst not love me CHORUS Well will I pray to God on high That thou my constancy may'st see And that once more before I die Thou wouldst vouchsafe to love me CHORUS Page 19 SONG Scarborough Fair (One of many versions) Are you going to Scarborough Fair Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme Remember me to one who lives there She once was a true love of mine Tell her to make me a cambric shirt Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme Without any seams or fine needlework Then she'll be a true love of mine Ask her to wash it in a dry well Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme Where never spring water nor rain ever fell Then she'll be a true love of mine Ask her to dry it on a flowering thorn Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme That never knew blossom since Adam was born Then she'll be a true love of mine Now, he has asked me questions three Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme I hope he will answer as many for me Then he'll be a true love of mine Tell him to find me an acre of land Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme Between the salt water and the sea strand. Then he'll be a true love of mine Tell him to plow it all with a lamb's horn Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme And sow it all over with one peppercorn Then he'll be a true love of mine Tell him to reap it with a sickle of leather Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme And bind it all up with a peacock's feather Then he'll be a true love of mine And when he's finished with all of his work Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme Then send to me for that cambric shirt. Then he'll be a true love of mine Are you going to Scarborough Fair Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme Remember me to one who lives there For she once was a true love of mine Page 20 SONG I Live Not Where I Love (note: This was untitled when I received it.) Come all you maids who live at a distance Many a mile from he you love Come and assist me this very moment For to pass away some time. Singing sweetly and completely Songs of pleasure and of love My heart is with you altogether Though I live not where I love. When I sleep, I dream about you When I wake I find no rest Every moment thinking of you My heart fixed within your breast Though great distance may prove assistance From my mind your love to lose My heart is with you altogether Though I live not where I love. So, farewell lads and farewell lasses Now I think I've got my chance I'll away to yonder island Where I think I hear your voice. If you call then I will follow Though the ocean be so wide My heart is with you altogether Though I live not where I love. Page 21 King Henry SONG Let never a man a wooing wend That lackest things three, A store of gold, an open heart, And full of charity. And this was seen of King Henry, Though he lay quite alone. For he's taken him to a haunted hall Seven miles from the town. He's chased the deer now him before, And the doe down by the don, 'Till the fattest buck in all the flock King Henry, he has slain. His huntsmen followed him to the hall To make them burly cheer, When loud the wind was heard to sound And an earthquake rocked the floor. And darkness covered all the hall, Where they sat at their meat. The grey dogs, yowling, left their food, And crept to Henry's feet. And louder howled the rising wind, And burst the fastened door, And in there came a grisly ghost, Stamping on the floor. Her head hit the rooftree of the house, Her belly you could not span. Each frightened huntsman fled the hall, And left the king alone. Her teeth were like the tether stakes, Her nose like club or mell, And nothing less she seemed to be, Than a fiend that came from hell. Some meat! Some meat! You, King Henry, Some meat you give to me! Go kill your horse, you, King Henry, And bring him there to me; He's gone and slain his berry brown steed, Though it made his heart full sore. For she's eaten up both skin and bone, Left nothing but hide and hair. More meat! More meat! You King Henry, Some meat you give to me! Go kill your greyhounds, King Henry, And bring them here to me. He's gone and slain his good grey hounds, Though it made his heart full sore. For she's eaten up both skin and bone, Left nothing but hide and hair. (continued) King Henry (continued) Page 22 SONG More meat! More meat! You, King Henry, Some meat you give to me! Go fell your goshawks, King Henry, And bring them here to me. He's gone and slain his gay goshawks, Though it made his heart full sore. For she's eaten up both skin and bone, Left nothing but feathers bare. Some drink! Some drink! You, King Henry, Some drink you bring to me! Oh you sew up your horses hide, And in it bring drink for me. And he's sewn up the bloody hide, And a pipe of wine put in, And she's drank it all up in one long draught, Left never a drop therein. A bed! a bed! Now, King Henry, A bed you'll make for me! Oh, you must pull the heather green, And make it soft for me. And pulled, has he, the heather green, And made for her a bed, And taken, has he, his gay mantle, And o'er it he has spread. Now take your clothes off, King Henry, And lie down by my side! Now swear! Now swear! You King Henry, To take me for your bride. Oh, God forbid, says King Henry, That ever the like betide, That ever a fiend that came from hell, Should stretch down by my side! When the night was gone, and the day was come, And the sun shown thru the hall, The fairest lady that ever was seen, Lay between him and the wall. I've met with many a gentle knight, That gave me such a fill, But never before with a courteous knight, That gave me all my will. Now fetch a ring, you, King Henry, And bring it here to me. Oh, fetch to me a golden ring, For I will marry thee. And fetched, has he, a golden ring, The finest in the land, And he's placed it on her finger bare, And kissed her outstretched hand. The Raven Is Calling Page 23 SONG The raven is calling, She sits at my side, She laughs like a demon, For death is my bride. She's courted me often, But ne'er in the sun, And now she will wed me, When the battle is done. The stag is my totem, The bull is your own. 'Tis reason e'now That we fight all alone. I have called my young brother, But now we must fight, And the victor be crowned, Ere the day turns to night. Oh, my brother be wary, I'll not easily die, Though the season is turning, And the sun is sae high. My sword, it is heavy, My arms, they are cold. Though the raven is calling, I'll do battle sae bold. My shield, it is broken, Like the covenant sworn, 'Twixt the gods and my mother, On the day I was born. They promised her truly, That I would not die, 'Till the sun stood quite still, In the solstice day sky. The raven is calling, With her black mocking voice. I would not heed it, But she leaves me nae choice, She sings as she flies, Across the sun's face, And the shadow, it falls, On this very place. Now wisdom is folly, And folly is wise, When the battle is joined, And the sun's in your eyes. I have fought like the champion I was raised up to be, But the raven is calling, She's calling for me. Page 24 The Broom of the Cowdenknows SONG How blithe was I each morn to see My love come o'er the hill. I jumped the stream, and she flew to me, And met me with good will. CHORUS |------------------------------------------| | Oh, the broom, the bonny, bonny broom, | | The broom of the Cowdenknows. | | I wish I was in my own homeland, | | There with my own true love. | |------------------------------------------| I worried not for ewes or lambs, While both our flocks near me lay. I gathered in our sheep at night, And she cheered me all the day. CHORUS She tuned her harp, and strummed so sweet, The birds stood listening by. E'en the dull cattle stood and gazed, Charmed by her melody. CHORUS While, thus, we spent our time by turns, Betwixt our flocks and play, I envied not the fairest lad, Though ne'er so rich and gay. CHORUS She did oblige me every hour, Could I but faithful be? She stole my heart, could I refuse, What e'er she asked of me? CHORUS Hard fate that I should banished be, Gang heavily with morn, Because I loved the dearest lass, That ever yet was born. CHORUS Adieu, ye Cowdenknows adieu, Farewell all pleasures there. Ye gods restore me to my love Is all I want or care. Oh, the broom, the bonny, bonny broom, The broom of the Cowdenknows. Ye, gods, restore me to my homeland. And to my ain true love. Page 25 SONG Sheep Crook and Black Dog Him- Here's my sheep crook, and my black dog, I give it to you. Here's my bag and my budget, I bid it adieu. Here's my sheep crook, and my black dog, I leave them behind. Fine laurel, fine floral You've proved unkind. All to my dear Dianah these words I did say Tomorrow we'll be married love, Tomorrow's the day. Her- 'Tis too soon dear Willy, my age is too young. One day to our wedding is one day to soon. I'll go into service, if the day ain't too late. To wait on a fine lady is my intent. And when into service a year or two bound, Its then we'll get married and both settle down. Him- A little time later a letter I wrote. For to see if my Dianah had changed her mind. But she wrote that she'd lived such a contrary life, She said that she'd never be a young shepherd's wife. SONG Do Virgins Taste Better (Also known as - An Old Cliche Revisited) Words by: R. Farran Tune: The Irish Washerwoman A dragon has come to our village today. We've asked him to leave, but he won't go away. Now he's talked to our king and they worked out a deal. No homes will he burn and no crops will he steal. Now there is but one catch, we dislike it a bunch. Twice a year he invites him a virgin to lunch. Well, we've no other choice, so the deal we'll respect. But we can't help but wonder and pause to reflect. Do virgins taste better than those who are not? Are they salty, or sweeter, more juicy or what? Do you savor them slowly? Gulp them down on the spot? Do virgins taste better than those who are not? Now we'd like to be shed you, and many have tried. But no one can get thru your thick scaly hide. We hope that some day, some brave knight will come by. 'Cause we can't wait around 'til you're too fat to fly. Now you have such good taste in your women for sure, They always are pretty, they always are pure. But your notion of dining, it makes us all flinch, For your favorite entree is barbecued wench. CHORUS Now we've found a solution, it works out so neat, If you insist on nothing but virgins to eat. No more will our number ever grow small, We'll simply make sure there's no virgins at all! CHORUS Page 27 Gilda and the Dragon SONG Words and Music by: Cynthia McQuillin Tape: Singer in the Shadows (With Leslie Fish) Sir Loren undertook a quest, the maiden Gilda seeking. He found her in a dragon's bed from 'neath the covers peeking. "What seek you here, Sir Loren, dear?", the dragon asked with guile. The noble knight could not but note the dragon's sated smile. "Why smilest thou, Lord Dragon, sir?" asked our hero in armor laden. "Why, you'd smile too," the worm replied, "if you'd just eaten a maiden." "Such candor," this young lordling cried, "must touch upon dishonor!" The dragon grinned his lecherous grin, and once more was upon her. "Cease and desist!", Sir Loren cried, his fine steel blade a-flashin'. "Oh, slay him not!", young Gilda cried, her voice a play of passion. "Was ever a maid so tried as I betwixt desire and honor? I should demand you slay the beast, but he stirs in me such ardor." "Fie, fie!", Sir Loren cried to her. "What foolishness is this?" "Would you deny your lord and land all for a dragon's kiss?" Intently he did search her face, then frowned in deep dismay As she shed a tear for honor's sake, and sent him away. "Why smilest thou, Lord Dragon, sir?" asked our hero in armor laden. "Why, you'd smile too," the worm replied, "if you'd just eaten a maiden." Page 28 SONG Haul Away Joe Oh, When I was a little lad, My parents were so scoldy. Hey, haul away, we'll haul away Joe. But if I did not kiss the girls, My lips would soon grow moldy. Hey, haul away, we'll haul away Joe. CHORUS |------------------------------------------------| | Hey, haul away, we'll haul away together, | | Hey, haul away, we'll haul away Joe. | | Hey, haul away, we'll haul for finer weather, | | Hey, haul away, we'll haul away Joe. | |------------------------------------------------| Well, first I had a Spanish gal, But she was fat and lazy. Hey, haul away, we'll haul away Joe. Then I had an Irish girl, She nearly drove me crazy. Hey, haul away, we'll haul away Joe. CHORUS Next I had an English girl, But she would not be civil. Hey, haul away, we'll haul away Joe. I put my dagger in her back And sent her to the devil. Hey, haul away, we'll haul away Joe. CHORUS Oh, listen while I tell you About my darlin' Nancy. Hey, haul away, we'll haul away Joe. She's copper-bottomed, clipper built, Mighty fine and fancy. Hey, haul away, we'll haul away Joe. CHORUS Page 29 OLD TIME RELIGION - A Filky old tune FILK CHORUS - Repeat after each verse. Note: There are three |-----------------------------------| jillian verses, | Give me that old time religion, | at last count. | Give me that old time religion, | I haven't tried | Give me that old time religion, | to gather them all! | It's good enough for me. | |-----------------------------------| We'll be met by Aphrodite, She'll be out there in her nightie, She is kind of wild and flighty, But she's good enough for me. If your rising sign is Aries, You'll be taken by the fairies, Meet the Buddha in Benares, Where he'll hit you with a pie. We will have a mighty orgy, In the honor of Astarte, It'll be one hell-uva party, And that's good enough for me. Azathoth is in his chaos, Azathoth is in his chaos, Now, if only he don't slay us, Then that's good enough for me. We will venerate Bubastis, We will venerate Bubastis, If you want in just ask us, And that's good enough for me. As for those who read of Conan, As for those who read of Conan, They're all followers of Onan, And that's good enough for me. There will be a lot of lovin', When we're meeting in our coven, Quit your pushin' and your shovin', So there's room enough for me. We will all bow down to Enlil, We will all bow down to Enlil, Pass your cup and get a refill, With bold Gilgamesh the Brave. We will read from the Kaballa, We will read from the Kaballa, It won't get us to Valahalla, But it's good enough for me. Page 30 OLD TIME RELIGION ( continued ) FILK We will all meet at Nirvana, We will all meet at Nirvana, Take a left turn at Urbana, And you'll see the promised land. It was good enough for Loki, It was good enough for Loki, He thinks Thor's a little hokey, But that's good enough for me. We will all bow down to Mithras, We will all bow down to Mithras, Slay the bull and play the Zithrab, On that resurrection day. We will all sing "Hare Krishna", We will all sing "Hare Krishna", I can't find that in the mishna, But it's good enough for me. Now you might be a Pharisee, Now you might be a Pharisee, Walk on fire and you get in free, And that's good enough for me. There are some who follow Shinto, There are some who follow Shinto, There's no telling what they're into, But its good enough for me. I hear Valkyries a-coming, In the air their song is coming. They forgot the words, they're humming, But they're good enough for me. There are those who practice Voo-Doo, There are those who practice Voo-Doo, I know I do, I hope you do, And are good enough for me. We will sacrifice to Yuggoth, We will sacrifice to Yuggoth, Burn down a villiage to Yug-Sothos, And the goat of a thousand young. It's the opera written for us, We will all join in the chorus, It's the opera about Boris, Which is God-enough for me. Page 31 SONG Ramblin' Rover Chorus |---------------------------------------| | There be sober men aplenty, | | And drunkards barely twenty. | | There are men of over ninety | | Who have never yet kissed a girl. | | But give me the Ramblin' Rover, | | Frae Orkney down to Dover, | | We will roam the country over, | | And together we'll face the world. | |---------------------------------------| There be many who fain enjoyment, From merciless employment, Their admission was this deployment, From the minute they left the school. As they save and scrape and ponder, While the rest go out and squander, See the world and rove and wander, And were happier as a rogue. CHORUS Well, I've roved thru all tarnation, Seen the light in all creation, I've enjoyed the wee sensation, When my company did prove kind. And when courtin' was my pleasure, I drank another measure, To the good friends that we treasure, For they are always on our minds. CHORUS So when troubles do befall me, To the high road I do haul me, Robbin' Johnny's what you call me, 'Tis me blessing and me bane. Though my comrades have been many, I'll take a drink with any, 'Till I've spent me last wee penny, And life I'll not see again. CHORUS So when you're bent up with arthritis, And your bowels have got collitis, You've got gallopin' gollipanitis, And your thinkin' it's time you died, If you've been a man of action, As your lying there in traction, You will gain some satisfaction Thinkin', "Jesus, at least I tried." CHORUS Page 32 The Wild Rover SONG I've been a wild rover for many a year, And I've spent all my money on whiskey and beer, But now I'm returning with gold in great store, And I never will play the wild rover no more. CHORUS |----------------------------------------------------| | And it's no, nay, never. No, nay, never, no more, | | Will I play the rover. No never, no more. | |----------------------------------------------------| I went to an ale house I used to frequent, And I told the landlady my money was spent. I asked her for credit, she answered me nay. Such custom like yours I could have any day. CHORUS I took from my pocket ten sovereigns bright, And the landlady's eyes opened wide with delight, She said, "I have whiskeys and wines of the best, And I'll take you upstairs, and I'll show you the rest." CHORUS I'll go home to my parents, confess what I've done, And I'll ask them to pardon their prodigal son. And if they caress me as oft times before, I never will play the wild rover no more! CHORUS SONG I'm a Rover Traditional. Also titled: A Health To All True-Lovers CHORUS |---------------------------------| | I'm a rover, seldom sober. | | I'm a rover of high degree. | | It's when I'm drinking, | | I'm always thinking, | | How to gain my love's company. | |---------------------------------| 'Tis many a night I'm going to ramble, 'Tis many a night I'm going to roam. 'Tis many a night I'm going to ramble Into the arms of my own true love. CHORUS O, though the night be as dark as dungeon, Still a star be seen above, I shall be guided without a stumble, Into the arms of my own true love. CHORUS I stepped up to her bedroom window. I tapped softly upon the pane, I whispered through her bedroom window, "My darlin' dear, do you lie alone?" CHORUS She raised her head from her downsoft pillow, Weaved her arms about her breast, Says "What is that at my bedroom window, Disturbing me at my long night's rest?" CHORUS Says I, "My darling, it's thy true lover, Open the door and let me in. For I have come on this long night's journey, For to be in thy arms again." CHORUS She opened the door with the greatest pleasure, Opened the door, and let me in. And we touched hands and embraced each other, Until the mornin' we lay as one. CHORUS Says I "My darlin', I must leave you, To climb the hills, they're far above, But I shall climb with the greatest pleasure, I've been in the arms of my own true love. CHORUS Page 34 Spotted Cow SONG Traditional. One morning in the month of May, As from my cot I strayed, Just at the dawning of the day, I met with a charming maid. Just at the dawning of the day I met with a charming maid. "Good morning to you, whither?", said I "Good morning to you now." The maid replied, "Kind sir", she cried, "I've lost me spotted cow." The maid replied, "Kind sir", she cried, "I've lost me spotted cow." "No longer weep, no longer mourn, Your cow's not lost, my dear. I saw her down in yonder grove, Come, love, and I'll show you where. I saw her down in yonder grove, Come, love, and I'll show you where." "I must admit, you're very kind I thank you sir", said she. "We will be sure her there to find, Come, love, and I'll show you where. We will be sure her there to find, Come, love, and I'll show you where." And in the grove they spent the day, They thought it passed too soon. At night they homeward bent their way, While brightly shone the moon. At night they homeward bent their way, While brightly shone the moon. Now, if he should cross the flowery dale, Or go to view the plow, She comes and calls, "You, gentle swain, I've lost me spotted cow." She comes and calls, "You, gentle swain, I've lost me spotted cow." Page 35 SONG The Golden Vanity Oh, there is a lofty ship, and she sails the open sea, And the name of our ship is the Golden Vanity, And we fear we will be taken by the Spanish enemy And sunk beneath the Lowland, Lowland, Lowland, Sunk beneath the Lowland Sea. Then up spoke our cabin boy, and boldly out spake he, Saying unto the captain, "What will ye give to me, If I should swim alongside of the Spanish enemy, And sink her in the Lowland, Lowland, Lowland, Sink her in the Lowland Sea." "Oh I will give you silver, and gold," said he. "And my own fair daughter your bonny bride shall be, If you will swim alongside of the Spanish enemy, And sink her in the Lowland, Lowland, Lowland, Sink her in the Lowland Sea." So the cabin boy made ready and overboard sprang he, And he swam to the side of the Spanish enemy. And with his drilling tool, in her side he bore holes three. And sank her in the Lowland, Lowland, Lowland, Sank her in the Lowland Sea. Then the cabin boy swam back to the Golden Vanity And he called up to the Captain for to pull him from the sea. But the Captain would not heed him for his daughter he did need, And left him in the Lowland, Lowland, Lowland, Left him in the Lowland Sea. So the cabin boy turned round, and he swam to the port side, And he called up to his messmates and most bitterly he cried, Saying, "Messmates, pull me up, for I'm drifting with the tide, And I'm sinking in the Lowland, Lowland, Lowland, Sinking in the Lowland Sea." Well we pulled him up on board, but upon the deck he died. So we wrapped him in his hammock, which was so very wide. Then we cast him overboard, and he drifted with the tide, And he sank beneath the Lowland, Lowland, Lowland, Sank beneath the Lowland Sea. Oh, there is a lofty ship, and she sails the open sea, But she sails without a cabin boy whose age was twelve-and-three. And we fear we will be taken by the Spanish enemy And sunk beneath the Lowland, Lowland, Lowland, Sunk beneath the Lowland Sea. Page 36 SONG Woad of Harlech What's the use of wearing braces, Hats, or spats, or shoes with laces, Vests and pants you buy in places, Down on Broughampton Road? What's the use of shirts of cotton, Studs that always get forgotten, These affairs are simply rotten! Better far is woad! Woad's the stuff to show men, Woad to scare your foemen! Boil it to a brilliant blue And rub it on your legs and your abdomen! Ancient Britons never hit on Anything as good as woad to fit on Necks or knees or where you sit on, Tailors, you'd be blowed! Romans came across the Channel All dressed up in tin and flannel; Half a pint of woad per man-o Clothed us more than these! Saxons, you may save your stitches Building beds for bugs in britches. We have woad to clothe us which is Not a nest for fleas. Romans, keep your armors, Saxons, your pajamas! Hairy coats were made for goats, Gorillas, yaks, retriever dogs, and llamas! March on, Snowdon, with your woad on, Never mind if you get rained or snowed on. Never need a button sewed on, Good for us today! Page 37 SONG Spring Strathspey By Gwydion Myrddyn was playing his pipes in the wood, And it sounded so good to my feeling. Hiree, hiroo stirred the dance in the blood, And my fresh maidenhood started reeling. Sweetly it drew me, the song that went through me, As if sure it knew me, a maiden-song, laughing long. I'm sure that I hear it, Oh, let me draw near it, I want to be merrily courted in spring. Round us the trees formed a wheel in my mind, As if all womankind were careering. Softly he touched me, our hands intertwined, And we gently reclined in the clearing. Sweetly it drew me, the song that went through me, As if sure it knew me, a maiden-song, laughing long. I'm sure that I hear it, Oh, let me draw near it, I want to be merrily courted in spring. Dew-fall to star-fall he made love to me, In a manner so free and revealing. Swift-footed, light-footed, goat-footed, he Played a sweet melody with such feeling. Sweetly it drew me, the song that went through me, As if sure it knew me, a maiden-song, laughing long. I'm sure that I hear it, Oh, let me draw near it, I want to be merrily courted in spring. Daylight and I wake to spring's sweet bouquet And a glorious day of beginning. Myrddyn has gone on his magical way, But the equinox day leaves me spinning. Sweetly it drew me, the song that went through me, As if sure it knew me, a maiden-song, laughing long. I'm sure that I hear it, Oh, let me draw near it, I want to be merrily courted in spring. Three Gypsies Page 38 SONG Three gypsies came to our hall door, They came brave and boldly, Oh, And the one sang high, and the other sang low, Made the lady sing the wraggle taggle gypsy, Oh. Upstairs and down, the lady went, She put on silk and leather, Oh, And the cry's gone up all around the door, She's away with the wraggle taggle gypsy, Oh. Well, late last night the lord came home, Inquiring for his lady, Oh, And the serving girls replied to him all, She's away with the wraggle taggle gypsy, Oh. The saddle for me, the fastest steed, Me big horse is not speedy, Oh, I'll ride far and wide to seek for me bride, She's away with the wraggle taggle gypsy, Oh. He rode fast east, and he rode west, He rode north and south, also, And it's when he has come to the wide open field, It's there that he's found his lady, Oh. Oh, why would you leave your house and lands, Why would you leave your money, Oh, Why would you leave your only wedded lord, To follow with the wraggle taggle gypsy, Oh. Oh, what do I care for my house and land, What care I for money, Oh, What do I care for my only wedded lord, When I can have my wraggle taggle gypsy, Oh. Last night you slept in your goose feather bed, With the sheets turned down so boldy, Oh, Tonight you lie in the wide open field, In the arms of the wraggle taggle gypsy, Oh. Oh, what do I care for a goose feather bed, And sheets to turn so boldy, Oh, When I can lie in the wide open field, In the arms of my wraggle taggle gypsy, Oh. For you rode east, and I rode west, You rode high and I rode low, I'd rather have the kiss of my yellow gypsy's lips, Than all of your cache of money, Oh. Three gypsies came to our hall door, They came brave and boldy, Oh, And the one sang high, and the other sang low, And the lady sang the wraggle taggle gypsy, Oh. Page 39 SONG Paddy's Song ( With modifications for the SCA ) My Lord, I write this note, for to tell you of my plight. And at the time of writing, I am not a pretty sight. My body is all black and blue, my face, a deathly grey. And I write this note to say why I'm not on the wall, today. While working on the castle wall, some bricks I had to clear. For to throw them down from off the top seemed quite a good idea. But the bailiff, he would not agree, him being an awful sod. He said I'd have to cart them down the ladder, in my hod. Well, clearing all these bricks by hand, it seemed so very slow. So I hoisted up a barrel, and secured the rope below. But in my haste, to do the job, I was too blind to see, That a barrel full of building bricks is heavier than me. So when I untied the rope, of course, the barrel fell like lead. And clinging tightly to the rope, I started up instead. I shot up like an arrow, and to my dismay I found, That halfway up, I met the bloody barrel coming down. Well, the barrel broke my shoulder as towards the ground it sped, And when I reached the top, I banged the pulley with my head. I clung on tight, though numb with shock, from that almighty blow, While the barrel spilled out half it's bricks, some forty feet below. Now when the bricks had fallen from the barrel to the floor, I then outweighed the barrel, so I started down once more. Still clinging tightly to the rope, I raced towards the ground. And I landed on those broken bricks that lay scattered all around. While, as I lay there moaning, I thought sure I'd passed the worst, But when the barrel hit the top, 'twas then the bottom burst. A shower of bricks rained down on me, I didn't have a hope, And in the great confusion, I let go the bloody rope. Well, the barrel now was heavier, and it started down once more. And it landed right on top of me, as I lay there on the floor. It broke three ribs, and my left arm, and I can only say, I hope you understand why I'm not on the wall, today. Page 40 SONG When I Was a Young Man Words: Peter Beagle Music: "Ash Grove" When I was a young man, and very well thought of, I couldn't ask aught that the ladies denied. I nibbled their hearts like a handful of raisins, And I never spoke love but I knew that I lied. But I said to myself, "Ah, they none of them know The secret I shelter and savor and save. I wait for the one who will see through my seeming, And I'll know when I love by the way I behave." The years drifted over like clouds in the heavens; The ladies went by me like snow on the wind. I charmed and I cheated; deceived, and dissembled, And I sinned, and I sinned, and I sinned, and I sinned. But I said to myself, "Ah, they none of them see There's a part of me pure as the whisk of a wave. My lady is late, but she'll find I've been faithful, And I'll know when I love by the way I behave." At last came a lady both knowing and tender, Saying, "You're not at all what they take you to be." I betrayed her before she had quite finished speaking, And she swallowed cold poison and jumped in the sea. And I say to myself, when there's time for a word, As I gracefully grow more debauched and depraved, "Ah, love may be strong, but a habit is stronger, And I knew when I loved by the way I behaved." Page 41 SONG Rosin the Bow (Tune can be found on Clancy Brothers Album "Come Fill Your Glass With Us") I've traveled this wide world over, And down to another I go. And I know that good quarters are waiting To welcome old Rosin the Bow. (Chorus after every verse, using last two lines of that verse.) |-------------------------------------------------| | To welcome old Rosin the Bow, | | To welcome old Rosin the Bow, | | And I know that good quarters are waiting, | | To welcome old Rosin the Bow, | |-------------------------------------------------| When I'm dead and laid out on the counter, A voice you will hear from below, Sayin' "Send down a hogshead of whiskey, To drink with old Rosin the Bow." Well, take a half-dozen stout fellows, And line them up all in a row, And drink out of half-gallon bottles, To the mem'ry of Rosin the Bow. Then take those half-dozen stout fellows, And let them all stagger and go, And dig a great hole in the meadow, And in it put Rosin the Bow. Then get you two bottles of whiskey, Put one at me head and me toe. With a diamond ring scratch upon 'em. The name of bold Rosin the Bow. I hear that old tyrant approachin' That cruel, remorseless old foe, And I lift up me glass in his honor, Take a drink with old Rosin the Bow. Page 42 SONG When the Ale Runs Out By: Geoffery McAnder of Emerald Keep I woke up this morning, trying to get up, I've quite a headache, reach for my cup, I look in horror, with a disbelieving blink, I've just discovered, I'm all out of drink. CHORUS |---------------------------------------------------| | What do you do when you run out of ale? | | Do you cry, sigh, yell, or turn pale? | | What do you do when you run out of ale? | | You run to the tavern and drink down another! | |---------------------------------------------------| Just finished fighting, swashbuckling too, And as hot as it is, I'm beginning to stew. My throat is so dry, I'm dying of thirst, But my opponent has beaten me and drank it all first! CHORUS I'm now hearing stories, poets, and song, I never realized it would take so long! Still I stand attentive, my goblet in hand, But it's just like me, dry as the land! CHORUS They're still telling stories, but it's now late at night. The fire's died low and I'm seeing this sight. Everyone's sleeping, but I'm burning mad, Because after searching, there's no ale to be had! CHORUS I'm falling fast now, into deep sleep and trance, And the last thing I remember that catches my glance, Is my empty old tankard from which flows never a drop, Will someone please make my aleless dreams stop! CHORUS Page 43 SONG The Minstrel and the Lady Copyright (C) 1988 Permission is granted to perform by Dierdre Mulleabhar for non-monetary purposes. mka Debra Eccles A wandering minstrel came on by my house to sing a song Said he "Oh lady fair, for you I'd sing the whole day long. I'd sing a song of love and beauty, A song so wild and free, I'd sing a song to make you fall so wild in love with me." CHORUS |---------------------------------------------------| | Singing hey la lady, hey la lady, hey la lady low | | Hey la hey la hey la lady, hey la lady low | |---------------------------------------------------| Then said I to the wandering minstrel, "Oh please sing your song. Sing to me of love and beauty, sing the whole day long. Sing to me a song so lovely...song so wild and free Sing to me of love and beauty, and of what could be." CHORUS The wandering minstrel he did stay and he did sing to me. He sang a song of wondrous beauty, made me feel so free That before the day was over, I did beg him stay To sing to me his wondrous songs for just another day. CHORUS And he did stay another day and he did sing to me And through his songs, so wondrous fair, I thought of what could be. I forgot a wandering minstrel wanders every day And that he would never with one single lady stay. CHORUS I did give to him my love, yes, I did make so free. He took my love and in the morning he left merrily. He found another lovely lady shining like a light And he did sing to her all day, and even through the night. CHORUS And so if a minstrel man should come to you some day And says for you I'd like to sing my songs and for you play, Send him packing quickly, lady, for though you be fair, Tomorrow when it's time to leave your sorrow he won't share. CHORUS Page 44 SONG I Gave my Love a Cherry I gave my love a cherry That had no stone. I gave my love a chicken That had no bone. I gave my love a ring That had no end. I gave my love a baby That's no cryin'. How can there be a cherry That has no stone? How can there be a chicken That has no bone? How can there be a ring That has no end? How can there be a baby That's no cryin'? A cherry when it's blooming It has no stone. A chicken when it's pippin' It has no bone. A ring when it's a rolling It has no end. A baby when it's sleeping Is no cryin'. Page 45 SONG Three Ravens I believe this is period, but I'm not sure. There were three ravens sat on a tree Down-a-down, hey down-a-down And they were as black as they might be With a Down-a-down, hey down-a-down One of them said to his mate, "What shall we for our breakfast take?" With a down, derry, derry, derry down down.... Down in yonder green field Down-a-down, hey down-a-down..... There lies a knight slain under his shield With a Down-a-down, hey down-a-down..... Down there comes a fallow doe As great with young as she might go With a down, derry, derry, derry down down.... She lifted up his bloody head, Down-a-down, hey down-a-down..... And kissed his wounds that were so red, With a Down-a-down, hey down-a-down..... She got him up across her back And carried him to the earthen rack, With a down, derry, derry, derry down down.... She buried him before his pride Down-a-down, hey down-a-down She was dead herself, 'ere eveningtide, With a Down-a-down, hey down-a-down..... God send every gentleman fine hawks, fine hounds, And such a loved one! With a down, derry, derry, derry down down.... Page 46 SONG All Around My Hat Arranged by Steve Lauerbach aka Malcolm the Wanderer Album: First Harvest - St. Lauerbach Traditional English Love Song. CHORUS |-----------------------------------| | All around my hat | | I will wear the green willow. | | All around my hat, | | For a twelvemonth and a day. | | And if anyone should ask me | | The reason why I'm wearin' it, | | It's all for my true love, | | Who's far, far away. | |-----------------------------------| Fare thee well cold winter, And fare thee well cold Frost. Nothing I have gained But my own true love have lost. I'll sing and I'll be merry, When occasion I do see. He's a false, deluded young man, Let him go, farewell he. CHORUS The other night he brought me A fine golden ring, Well, he thought to deprive me Of a far finer thing! But I, being careful, As true lovers ought to be. He's a false, deluded young man; Let him go, farewell he. CHORUS Here's a half a pound of reason And a quarter pound of sense A small sprig of time, And as much of prudence. Now mix them all together, And you will plainly see, He's a false, deluded young man Let him go, farewell he. Page 47 SONG Karelia's Song By Iolo Fitz Owen Oh, the Baron of Eastmarch's fair sorcerous daughter Was enamored unseemly with the fool of her lord. Though her duke was deemed handsome he'd a soul vain and petty, And a dark mind as empty as last summer's gourd. Now the fool, he was clever and he sang for the lady, Like a nightingale piping in a green forest hall, But his station was lowly and his body was aging, And their love was as hopeless as if he were stone. So the lady has led them, the fool and her husband, To her cool, secret garden by the Midsummer's moon, And she's danced them a spell there of shifting and changing, And left them dumbfounded by sorcery's boon. She has left the fool crying to the gods of his fathers, She has led her duke laughing to her high chamber door, And shes kept him there softly through two day's bright dawnings, While her servants all gossiped in wonder and awe. Now the fool died in madness, saying he was ensorceled, And the duke only smiled him a sad, secret smile. Now the duke rules his people with wit and good humor And he sings for his lady like the nightingale's song. And she's borne him five children, two sons and three daughters, And they've grown straight and handsome, and sorcerers all, And they dance in the garden and sing in the moonlight, Like a nightingale piping in a green forest hall. Page 48 SONG Iolo's Song By Brendan O' Corraidhe Down in Bryn Gwlad town lives a jolly old fellow Whose figure is really a comical sight. Oh, his forehead is bald and his eyes will amaze you, And his gold-covered codpiece is really quite bright. Well, he wears baggy pants and a ragged old tunic, His shoes give his tootsies a room with a view. And he acts very silly, and he does antler dances, And answers when summoned by the name, "Master Moo". Now his real name is Iolo, Don Iolo Fitz Owen. His White Scarf and Laurel are both well deserved, For he'll build you a crossbow like those in museums, Or thrash you at swashbuckling without reserve. He's a shaper of wood, and of bone, and of leather, A shaper of hearts with a word to the wise. He has carved standing stones to remember the fallen, And he'll sing you a song to bring tears to your eyes. Oh, the Great Selkie's bride and a cruel lass named Jennie, Karelia's lover and Myrddyn's gay flute, And the old standing stones and a host of Welsh heroes Spring once more to life when he picks up his lute. He's a craftsman, composer, a fool and a fighter, A good friend to many, he'll come when you call, And he'll dance in the garden and sing in the moonlight, Like a nightingale piping in a green forest hall. Page 49 SONG Free Born Man of the Travelin' People I'm a free-born man of the travelin' people. Got no fixed abode, with nomads I have wandered. Country lanes an' byways Were always my ways. I never fancied bein' 'cumbered. Oh, we knew the woods and the restin' places, And the small birds sang when winter days were over. Then we'll pack our load, And be on the road. Those were the good old days for a rover. There was open ground where a man could linger For a week or two, for time was not our master. Then away we'd jog, With our horse and dog. Nice and easy, no need to go faster. Now I've known life hard, and I've known it easy, And I've cursed the life when winter days were dawning. But I've laughed and sung Thru the whole night long. Seen the summer's sunrise in the morning. All ye free born men of the traveling people, Every tinker, rollin' stone, and gypsy rover, Winds of change are blowin', Old ways are goin'. Your travelin' days will soon be over. Page 50 SONG The Burden of the Crown By: Derek Foster The battlefield is silent, the shadows growing wan Though I may view the sunset, I'll not live to see the dawn The leaves have ceased to rustle, the birds no longer sing. All nature seems to wonder at the passing of our king. And now you stand before me, your father's flesh and blood Begotten of my sinew and the woman that I love. So difficult the birthing, the mother died that day And now you stand before me to bear my crown away. The hour is fast approaching, when you come into your own, When you take the ring and scepter and you sit upon the throne. Before that final hour, when we each must meet our fate Pray gaze upon the Royal Crown and marvel at it's weight. This cap of burnished metal is the symbol of our land Supporting all we cherish, the dream for which we stand. The weight, you'll find, is nothing, when you hold it in your palm The burden of the crown begins the day you put it on. See how the jewel sparkles when you gaze at it again; Each facet is a subject whose rights you must defend, Every point of light a burden you must shoulder with your own, And mighty is the burden of the man upon the throne. My waiting now is over, my limbs are growing cold I can feel the angels waiting to receive my passing soul. Keep well for me my kingdom when my memory is dead, And forgive me for the burden I place upon your head. Page 51 SONG Greenwood Side (note: This was untitled when I received it. Also, it is unclear whether it is loney or lonely.) There were two sisters goin' to town All around the loney, oh. They spied a lady, her head hung down Down by the Greenwood side, oh. She had a baby on her knee All around the loney, oh. A cruel fate they could see Down by the Greenwood side, oh. She held the baby to her heart All around the loney, oh. And said, "Dear baby, we both must part Down by the Greenwood side, oh." She held the baby to her breast All around the loney, oh. And said, "Dear baby, we'll both find rest Down by the Greenwood side, oh." There's a river wide and deep All around the loney, oh. It's there both baby and mother sleep Down by the Greenwood side, oh. Page 52 The Return of the King SONG Dark, dark is the swirling flood. Black, black is the stain of blood. Deep slumbers the apples bud, While low fires burn. Winds blow where the night is chill. Owls shriek from the highest hill. She waits 'neath the moon, until Her lover's return. Low now is the star, In it's course in the sky. Each day it passes by, Winter is not far. Leaves fall from the dying trees, Blown bare by the Autumn breeze. Now locked in deep mysteries, He sleeps in the earth. Here, lonely, the lady roves, Thru frosty fields and groves, Earth waits for the king she loves, Waiting to give birth. When summer was high, And the leaves were bright green, Stags in the woods were seen, Birds blackened the sky. Red mantle and silver wing, Flash bright in the early spring, True love is awakening, On the lady's bright face. Long winter is passing now. Buds swell on the apple bough, Earth thaws and receives the plow, Where lovers embrace. All creatures rejoice, For the King and his Queen, Wearing the garlands of green, Now speaking one voice. Winds blow where the night is chill. Owls shriek from the highest hill. She waits 'neath the moon until Her lover's return. Page 53 The Saucy Sailor SONG Come, my own one, Come, my fair one. Come now unto me. Could you fancy a poor sailor lad, Who has just come from the sea? You are ragged, love, you are dirty, love, And your cloths smell much of tar. So, begone, you saucy sailor lad. So, begone, you Jack Tar. If I am ragged, love, and I am dirty, love, And my cloths smell much of tar, I have silver in my pocket love, And I've gold in great store. And when she had heard him say so, On her bended knees she fell, I will marry my dear sailor, For I love my sailor lad so well. Well, do you think that I am foolish? Do you think that I am mad? For marry a poor country girl, Where no fortune's to be had. I will cross the briny ocean, I will whistle and sing, And since you have refused the offer, love, Some other girl shall wear my ring. I am frolicsome, I am easy, Good tempered and free, And I don't give a single pin, me boys, What the world thinks of me. Page 54 SONG Bare Is the Brotherless Back A song for Calontir and Ansteorra Tune: "The Nancy" from Stan Rogers' From Fresh Water I sing here of a brotherhood as sharp as any spear, As bright as the falcon that soars o'er the glorious lands of Calontir, As strong as the lion's heart that roars in the land of the Sable Star, Of two great sovereign kingdoms side by side in every war. For when there are fair ground to take, and enemies in the way, 'Tis best to call the falcons all, and the Black Star banner, hey! And though the foes do fill the field, there's none can bar the way, For the falcon's scream and the lion's roar will always win the day! CHORUS |-----------------------------------------------------------| | Vivat the Black Star! Hurrah for Calontir and Ansteorra! | | The lion and the falcon stand together o'er the foe! | |-----------------------------------------------------------| ( Pennsic XIII ) When called to war out in the East, the falcon she did fly And answered on the dragon's call, "To war, or else to die," The falcon called upon her kin, the lion of the Star, And side by side they fought, and sealed a brotherhood of war. For when there are fair grounds to take, and tygers in the way, 'Tis best to call on the falcon's wall and the Black Star banner, hey! And though outnumbered six to one, there's none can bar the way For the falcon's scream and the lion's roar will always save the day! CHORUS ( continued ) Page 55 SONG Bare Is the Brotherless Back (continued) ( Atenvelt War ) When calls of war came from the South, and reached the falcon's ears, She flew unto the lion's aid and faced the Aten spears. Down in a ditch, and on a road, and in a field of hay These brothers fed Mother Atenvelt's dead to the ravens there that day! For when your homelands are at stake, and the sun stands in the way, 'Tis best to call the falcons all, and the Black Star banner, hey! And though the foes do fill the field, there's none can bar the way, For the falcon's scream and the lion's roar will always win the day! CHORUS ( Pennsic XIV ) More calls of battle from the East, brought us to another war. We fought in the woods, and we fought on the bridges, as we did the year before. The best of the tygers fell to our blows in the bloodiest of the fray, And once again, the Dragon was saved by the lion and the falcon that day! For when there are fair grounds to take, and Tygers in the way, 'Tis best to call on the purple wall and the Black Star banner, hey! And though outnumbered ten to one, there's none can bar the way For the falcon's scream and the lion's roar will always save the day! CHORUS I sing here of a brotherhood as sharp as any spear, As bright as the falcon that soars o'er the glorious lands of Calontir, As strong as the lion's heart that roars in the land of the Sable Star, For bare is the brotherless back is the way that we always win the war! Vivat the Black Star! Hurrah for Calontir and Ansteorra! The lion and the falcon stand together o'er the foe! Vivat the Black Star! Hurrah for Calontir and Ansteorra! For bare is the brotherless back is the way that we always win the war! Page 56 SONG Who's the Fool Now Martin said to his man, Fie, man fie. Martin said to his man, Who's the fool now? Martin said to his man, Fill thou the cup, and I the can. Thou hast well drunken, man, Who's the fool now? ( Repeats, using first lines in place of "Martin Said" ) ( second lines in place of "Fill thou" ) ( Then repeat first verse at the end. ) I saw a man in the moon. Chasing off a flock of loons. I saw a mouse chase a cat. I saw a cheese eat a rat. I saw a flea heave a tree. Thirty miles out to sea. I saw a maid milk a bull. Every stroke a bucket full. Page 57 SONG Angus's Kilt By: Mychael Sean Macleish of Emerald Keep Have ye heared the tale The bonnie Scots telled 'Bout Ol' Angus MacLeish And what's in his kilt? If ye listen to me I'll tell ye I will; All that I've heared 'Bout Angus' kilt. CHORUS |----------------------------------| | 'Twas a big one he had. | | Much larger than mine | | And the bonnie lasses bragged | | 'Bout it all o' the time. | |----------------------------------| Once out on the lochs, A storm took our sail, But ol' Angus saved us all With his kilt in the gale. So we sailed into port With his kilt in our rig, And the crowds did exclaim "My God, it is big!" CHORUS Once out on the high moors In the snows we were lost. With no hopes of shelter To keep out the frost. If not for ol' Angus We'd 've died in the wind, But a pavilion we had When his kilt was unpinned. CHORUS Page 58 Angus's Kilt (continued) SONG Once o'er in the Holy Lands, When we needed a flag, But we could nae find naught Save a dirty ol' rag. But ol' Angus once more Did he come to our aid. When he unwound his kilt. For our victory parade. CHORUS Once after a battle We needed a shroud. To bury not one, But the whole clan McCloud. Ol' Angus stepped forward And said to the priest; "Ye can have me kilt, sir, To cover up your deceased." CHORUS Once making some scotch When we needed a sieve. To strain through with whiskey From Erin I believe. Ol' Angus once more Did he top all the rest. When he took off his kilt, And made that batch our best. CHORUS, 1st Verse, End. Page 59 SONG Ale In My Cup By: Stephen of the Grove I've wandered and traveled throughout many lands. I've smiled at the ladies, and I've kissed their hands. I've told a few stories, and sang 'till sun up, And I'll do it tonight, if there's ale in my cup. I'll drink until morning, I don't need a dare, I'll laugh at the King,...(pause)... if the King doesn't care. I'll be under the table, but then I'll stand up, As soon as you pour me some ale in my cup. I'll drink and I'll sing, all through the night, I'll sleep only after I've seen the daylight, I'll rise for the feast, I'll sit down and sup, And then I will revel with ale in my cup. I'll play with my balls to amuse the crowd, And if I do well, they'll all laugh out loud. With three in my hands, I'll start to throw up, But I juggle much better, with-out ale in my cup. So I'll build a fire, and you bring a chair, You bring your guitar, and you just be there. You tell a story and you sing a song, And if we all know it we'll all sing along. We'll sing about maidens rescued by Kings, Tell stories of seamen and sea-monster things, And if someone asks me, why then I'll get up, And sing you a song about ale in my cup. Page 60 SONG Shepherd's Song See you the gaunt grey shadows Which move along the snows. They are the wolves a-hunting, As well the shepherds know. See you yon golden figure Go gliding down the sky. Now that's the eagle waiting When lambing time is nigh. See you the dark shape lurking Behind the dry stone wall. Now that's a man come thieving, And he's the worst of all. Fire to frighten the wolf pack, And dogs to thwart the bird, A strong ash staff to the prowler, That's how I keep my herd. Basket of Eggs Found in Folk Songs By Master Composers. Page 61 This 'child in basket' theme was popular in the 1600's. SONG Down in Sandbank fields, two sailors they were walking, Their pockets were both lined with gold, And as together they were talking, A fair maid there they did behold. With a little basket standing by her, As she sat down to take her ease. To carry it for her one of them offered. The answer was: "Sir, if you please." One of these sailors took the basket. "There's eggs in the basket, please take care; And if by chance you should out-walk me, At the Half-way House, please leave them there." Behold, these sailors, they did outwalk her, The Half-way House they did pass by. This pretty damsel she laughed at their fancy, And on the sailors she kept her eye. When these two sailors came unto an ale-house, There they did call for a pint of wine, Saying "Landlord, landlord, what fools in this nation! This young maid from her eggs we've twined. O landlord, landlord, bring us some bacon. We have got these eggs and we'll have some dressed." Behold, these sailors were much mistaken, As you shall say when you hear the rest. 'Twas then the landlord he went to the basket, Expecting of some eggs to find. He said: "Young man, you're much mistaken, Instead of eggs I've found a child." Then one of them sat down to weeping. The other one said: "It's not worthwhile. Here's fifty guineas I'll give to the baby, If any woman will take the child." The pretty young damsel she sat by the fire, And she had a shawl drawn over her face. She said" "I'll take it and kindly use it, When first I see the money paid." One of the sailors threw down the money. Great favour to the babe was shown. "Since it is so, then let's be friendly, For you know, this child is yours and mine." "Don't you remember a-dancing with Nancy, As long ago as Easter day?" "Oh yes, and I do, and she pleased my fancy, So now the fiddler I have paid." One of the sailors went up to the basket, And he kicked the basket over and o'er. "Since it is so, may we all be contented, But I'm hanged if I'll like eggs any more." Page 62 SONG Green Grow the Rashes, Oh! Found in Folk Songs By Master Composers. There's naught but care on ev'ry han', In every hour that passes, O; What signifies the life o' man If it were not for the lasses, O? CHORUS Green grow the rashes, O! Green grow the rashes, O! The sweetest hour that ever I spend, Are spent among the lasses, O! The worldly race may riches chase, And riches still may fly them, O; And though at last they catch them fast, Their hearts can ne'er enjoy them, O. CHORUS But gie me a quiet hour at even, My arms around my dearie, O; An' worldly cares, and worldly men, May all go topsy-turvy, O; CHORUS For you sober fool, ye sneer at this, Ye're naught but senseless asses, O; The wisest man the worl' saw He dearly loved the lasses, O! CHORUS Auld Nature swears, the lovely dears Her noblest work she classes, O: Her 'prentice hand she tried on man, An then she made the lasses, O. CHORUS Page 63 SONG The Miller of Dee Found in Folk Songs By Master Composers. Recorded in 1762, but mentioned by name in 1670's. There was a jolly miller once Lived on the river Dee; He worked and sang from morn 'till night, No lark more blythe than he. And this the burden of his song Forever used to be. I care for nobody, no, not I, If nobody cares for me. I love my mill, she is to me Like parent, child and wife; I would not change my station For any other in life. Then push, push, push the bowl, my boys, And pass it 'round to me; The longer we sit here and drink, The merrier we shall be. So let us his example take, And be from malice free; Let everyone his neighbor serve, As served he'd like to be. And merrily push the can about, And drink and sing with glee: If nobody cares a dot for us, Why, not a dot care we. Page 64 SONG Salisbury Plain Found in Folk Songs By Master Composers. This story-line was popular in the 1750-1850 period, but was usually done from the mans point of view. As I walked over Salisbury Plain, Oh, there I met a scamping young blade. He kissed me and enticed me so, 'Till along with him I was forced to go. We came unto a public house at last, And there for man and wife we did pass. He called for ale and wine and strong beer, 'Till at length we both to bed did repair. "Undress yourself, my darling," says he, "Undress yourself, and come to bed with me." "Oh yes, that I will," then says she, "If you'll keep all those flash girls away." "Those flash girls you need not fear, For you'll be safe-guarded, my dear. I'll maintain you as some lady so gay, For I'll go a-robbing on the highway." Early next morning my love he arose, And so nimbly he put on his clothes. Straight to the highways he set sail, And 'twas there he robbed the coaches of the mail. Oh, it's now my love in Newgate Jail do lie, Expecting every moment to die. The Lord have mercy on his poor soul, For I think I hear the death-bell for to toll. Page 65 Come Share the Dream SONG Lyrics by Sieglinde Syr Music by Sieglinde Syr and Iolo Fitz Owen This was printed, (I think,) in the T.I. Twentieth Year Issue. The musical score is available there. It was arranged by Brendan O'Corraiadhe and Robyn Solarius, and performed at TYC. Listen! The Laurel Branches sing; The wind give life thus to the song. Knight-hood's flower breathes once more, Born and bloomed a-maying. And on a spring wind it has flown, From sea to sea these twenty years; Seedlings of the dream have sown Ten, to the fullest glory grown. We who are here have heard The voice calling from by-gone days "Come share the dream, come live the legends, Relearn the ancient ways." CHORUS |----------------------------------------------------| | Come, share the dream, come hold it in your hands | | As it might once have been; | | Come live the legends that will never die | | Through us they live again. | |----------------------------------------------------| Reaching thru time, their touch is real, Upon the road of glory anon Side by side we ride with kings Bards shall sing our stories Tales are remembered skills not lost, As it once was it shall be again And through us our children will know Of the greatness long ago. Each spring's rebirth shall be the time When time it's pace would slow And for a moment take us once more Into the days of yore. CHORUS Those who began it here join hands With those for whom the magic is new, And it's spell a siren's song, Calls us all to follow. Heed it we will and follow still ideals Born of fire and sword Born these twenty years ago (Where) mist and wind the laurels blow. And to our shores and mountains And plains carry the living dream, As it once was it has been again; Chivalry lives, my friend. CHORUS Chivalry lives, my friend. Page 66 SONG The Ball of Ballinour The Queen was in the parlor, Eating bread and honey. The King was in the chambermaid And she was in the money. CHORUS |-----------------------------------| | Balls to your partner, | | Ass against the wall. | | If you cannot get ------ | | on a Saturday night, | | you cannot get ----- at all. | |-----------------------------------| Four and twenty virgins Came down from Inverness And when the ball was over There were four and twenty less. CHORUS There was doin' in the kitchen, And doin' it on the stones. Ya couldna' hear the music For the wheezin' and the groans. CHORUS The village butcher, he was there, A cleaver in his hand. And everytime he turned around, He circumcised the band. CHORUS The deacon's wife, well, she was there With her butt against the wall. "Put your money on the table, boys, 'Cause I'm going to do you all." CHORUS The letter carrier, he was there. The poor man had the pox. He couldn't do the ladies, So he did the letter box. CHORUS The village cripple he was there, Can you imagine that? Amusing himself by abusing himself, And catching it in his hat. CHORUS The bride was in the bedroom Talking to the groom. "The front! The front! And not the back, Is the entrance to the womb!" CHORUS When the ball was over Everyone confessed, "The doin' was exquisite, But the doin' was the best!" CHORUS Page 67 FILK The Gentry Are Sleeping (Also called The Hospitaller's Song ) (Tune: "When Johnny Comes Marching Home") (As you might expect, people often modify the verses to this one. It lends itself well for that.) The Gentry are sleeping One by One, Oyez... Oyez..., The Gentry are sleeping One by One, Oyez... Oyez..., The Gentry are sleeping One by One, And no one is having very much fun, And The Gentry are sleeping anywhere they can. Two by two... It's a terribly period thing to do. Three by three I think that's MY hand on my knee! Four by four On the furniture, on the floor. Five by five With everybody except their wives. Six by six With (insert name) up to (his/her) usual tricks. Seven by seven I think I've died and gone to heaven. Eight by eight Hurry up (insert name) or you'll be late. Nine by nine I don't know why, it must be the wine. Ten by ten No one's asleep and it's morning again. Page 68 FILK The Moose Song When I was a young lad I used to like girls, I'd play with their corsets and fondle their curls. 'Till one day, my lady I caught with some churl, Now you'd never get treated that way by a moose. CHORUS |----------------------------------------------------| | Moose, moose, I likes a moose, | | I've never had anything quite like a moose. | | I've had lots of lovers, my life has been loose, | | But I've never had anything quite like a moose. | |----------------------------------------------------| Now when I'm in need of a very good lay, I go to my closet and get me some hay. I go to my window and spread it around. 'Cause moose always come when there's hay on the ground. CHORUS Gorillas are all right on Saturday night, Lions and tigers, they puts up a fight. But it's just not the same when you slam your caboose, As the feeling you get when you humps with a moose. CHORUS I've done it with beasties with long flowing hair, I'd do it with snakes if their fangs were not there. I've done it with walrus, a monkey, and goose, But it's just not the same when you screw with a moose. CHORUS Now that I'm old and advanced in my years, I look back on my life and shed me no tears. As I sit in my chair with my glass of Matheus, Playing Hide-The-Salami with Melba the Moose. CHORUS Page 69 SONG Black Widows in the Privy Lyrics and Music by Heather Jones From the tape Horse Tamer's Daughter Centaur Publications PO Box 424 El Cerrito, CA 94530 Everyone knows someone we'd be better off without, But best not mention names, for we know not who's about. But why commit a murder, and risk the fires of hell, When black widows in the privy can do it just as well. Now, poison's good, and daggers, and arrows in the back, And if you're really desprate, you can try a front attack. But are they really worthy of the risk of being caught When black widows in the privy need not be bribed or bought? So, if there's one of whom wish most simply to be rid, Just wait 'til dark, then point the way to where the widows hid, And say to them, "I think you'll find that this one is the best," And black widows in the privy will gladly do the rest. Page 70 FILK Mainland Brit(ish) Crusader Filk by Eurich, once of Emerald Keep Tune: Yankee Doodle Dandy I'm a mainland Brit. Crusader, If I see a Moslem he will die. I'm off to reclaim my country's Holy Land, Though I'm not really sure why. Crusading makes a wonderful excuse, To pillage, plunder, loot, and kill. Smite the Moslems, take their booty, What an easy living. That is, as long as I don't die. That is, as long as I survive. That is, as long as I'm alive. Page 71 SONG The Trooper Watering His Nagg (c. 1707) Found in "Bawdy Verse, A Pleasant Collection" There was an Old Woman lived under a hill Sing trolly, lolly, lolly, lolly, lo! She had good Beer and ale for to sell Ho, Ho, had she so, had she so. She had a daughter, her name was Siss Sing trolly, lolly, lolly, lolly, lo! She kept her at home for to welcome her guests Ho, Ho, did she so, did she so. There came a trooper riding by Sing trolly, lolly, lolly, lolly, lo! He called for drink most plentifully Ho, ho, did he so, did he so. When one pot was out, he called for another Sing trolly, lolly, lolly, lolly, lo! He kissed the daughter before the mother Ho, ho, did he so, did he so. It was with the mother's own consent Ho, ho was it so was it so Quoth she "What is this so stiff and warm?" Sing trolly etc. "Tis Ball, my nagg; he will do you no harm" Ho, ho, won't he so, won't he so. But what is this hangs under his chin? Sing trolly etc. 'Tis the bag he puts his provender in Ho, ho, etc. Quoth he, "What is this?"; Quoth she,bla "'Tis a well Sing trolly, etc. "Where Ball, your nag, may drink his fill" Ho, ho, etc. "But what if my nag should chance to slip in Sing trolly etc. Then catch hold of the grass that grows on the brim Ho, ho, etc. "But what if the grass should chance to fail Sing trolly etc. Shove him in by the head, pull him out by the tail Ho, ho, etc. The Westminister Whore Page 72 (c. 1610) Found in "Bawdy Verse, A Pleasant Collection" SONG As I went to Westminister Abby I saw a younge Wenche on her backe, Cramminge in a Dildo of Tabby Into her Cunt Till 'twas ready to crack. "By your leave" said I, "Pretty Maid, Methinks your sport is but drye?" "I can get no better" she said; "Sir, And I'll tell you the reason why." "Madame P. hath a Thing at her breech, Sucks up all the scad of the Town; She's a damn'd lascivious Bitch And fucks for half-a-Crown." "Now, the Curse of a Cunt without Hair And ten thousand Poxes upon her; We pore whores may go hang in dispaire; We're undone by the Maydes of Honour." Then in Loyalty, as I was bound, Hering her speak in this sort. I fuckt her thrice on the ground, And bid her speak well of the Court. Page 73 SONG The Sea Crabb (c. 1620) Found in "Bawdy Verse, A Pleasant Collection" It was a man of Africa had a fair wife, Fairest that ever I saw the days of my life. With a ging, Boys, ging, ging, boys, ging. Tarradiddle, farradiddle, ging, boys, ging! This goodwife was big-belly'd and with a lad And ever she longed for a sea crabb. With a ging, Boys, ging, ging, boys, ging. Tarradiddle, farradiddle, ging, boys, ging! The goodman rose in the morning and put on his hose He went to the seaside and followed his nose. With a ging, etc. Says, "God speed, Fisherman, sailing on the sea; Hast thou any crabbs in thy bote for to sell to me?" With a ging, etc. "I have crabbs in my bote one two three. I have crabbs in by bote for to sell thee." With a ging, etc. The good man went home and ere he wist Put the crabb in the Chamberpot where his wife pisst, With a ging, etc. The good wife she went to do as she was wont: Up started the Crabbfish and catcht her by the cunt. With a ging, etc. "Alas," quoth the goodwife, "that ever I was born; The Devil is in the pisspot and has me on his horns." With a ging, etc. "If you be a crabb or crabfish by kind, Thou'll let thy hold go with a blast of cold wind."; With a ging, etc. The good man laid to his mouth and began to blow Thinking thereby that the Crabb would let go. With a ging, etc. "Alas!" quoth the goodman, "that ever I came hither; He has joined my wife's tail and my nose together!" With a ging, etc. The good man called his neighbours in with great wonder To part his wife's tail and his nose asunder. With a ging, etc. Page 74 POEM Juggling Jerry By George Meredith Found in '100 Poems About People' selected by Elinor Parker Pitch here the tent, while the old horse grazes: By the old hedge-side we'll halt a stage. It's nigh my last above the daisies: My next leaf'll be man's blank page. Yes, my old girl! and it's no use crying: Juggler, constable, king, must bow. One that outjuggles all's been spying Long to have me, and he has me now. We've travelled times to this old common: Often we've hung our pots in the forse. We've had a stirring life, old woman, You, and I, and the old grey horse. Races, and fairs, and royal occasions, Found us coming to their call: Now they'll miss us at our stations: There's a Juggler outjuggles all! Up goes the lark, as if all were jolly! Over the duck-pond the willow shakes. Easy to think that grieving's folly, When the hand's firm as driven stakes! Ay, when we're strong, and braced, and manful, Life's a sweet fiddle: but we're a batch Born to become the Great Juggler's han'ful: Balls he shies up, and is safe to catch. Here's where the lads of the village cricket: I was a lad not wide from here: Couldn't I whip off the bail from the wicket? Like an old world those days appear! Donkey, sheep, geese, and thatched ale-house - I know them! They are old friends of my haunts, and seem, Somehow as if kind thanks I owe them: Juggling don't hinder the heart's esteem. (continued) Page 75 Juggling Jerry ( continued ) POEM Juggling's no sin, for we must have victual: Nature allows us to bait for the fool. Holding one's own makes us juggle no little; But, to increase it, hard juggling's the rule. You that are sneering at my profession, Haven't you juggled a vast amount? There's the Prime Minister, in one session, Juggles more games than my sins'll count. I've murdered insects with mock thunder: Conscience, for that, in men don't quail. I've made bread from the bump of wonder: That's my business, and there's my tale. Fashion and rank all praised the professor: Ay! and I've had my smile from the Queen: Bravo, Jerry! she meant: God bless her! Ain't this a sermon on that scene? I've studied men from my topsy-turvy Close, and I reckon, rather true. Some are fine fellows: some, right scurvy: Most, a dash between the two. But it's a woman, old girl, that makes me Think more kindly of the race: And it's a woman, old girl, that shakes me When the Great Juggler I must face. We two were married, due and legal: Honest we've lived since we've been one. Lord! I could jump then like an eagle: You danced bright as a bit o' the sun. Birds in a May-bush we were! right merry! All night we kissed, we juggled all day. Joy was the heart of Juggling Jerry! Now from his old girl he's juggled away. It's past parsons to console us: No, nor no doctor fetch for me: I can die without my bolus; Two of a trade, lass, never agree! Parson and Doctor! - don't they love rarely Fighting the devil in other men's fields! Stand up yourself and match him fairly:" Then see how the rascal yields! I, lass, have lived no gypsy, flaunting Finery while his pore helpmate grubs: Coin I've stored, and you won't be wanting: You shan't beg from the troughs and tubs. Novly you've stuck to me, though in his kitchen Many a Marquis would hail you Cook! Palaces you could have ruled and grown rich in, But your old Jerry you never forsook. (continued) Page 76 Juggling Jerry ( continued ) POEM Hand up the chirper! Ripe ale winks in it; Let's have comfort and be at peace. Once a stout draught made me light as a linnet. Cheer up! the Lord must have his lease. May be - for none see in that black hollow - It's just a place where we're held in pawn, And when the Great Juggler makes as to swallow, It's just the sword-trick - I ain't quite gone! Yonder came smells of gorse, so nutty, Gold-like and warm: it's the prime of May. Better than mortar, brick and putty, Is God's house on a blowing day. Lean me more up the mound; now I feel it: All the old heath-smells! Ain't it strange? There's the world laughing, as if to conceal it, But He's by us, juggling the change. I mind it well, by the sea-beach lying, Once - it's long gone - when two gulls we beheld, Which, as the moon got up, were flying Down a big wave that sparkled and swelled. Crack, went a gun: one fell: the second Wheeled round him twice and was off for new luck: There is the dark her white wing beckoned: - Drop me a kiss - I'm the bird dead-struck! SONG MacIntyre Some friends and I in a public house Was playin' Dominoes one night When into the room a fireman came, his face all chalky-white. "What's up?" says Brown, "Have you seen a ghost? Have you seen your Aunt Mariah?" "Oh me Aunt Mariah be bugged," says he, "The bleedin' pub's on fire!" "Oh," says Brown, "What a bit o' luck, everybody follow me. It's down to the cellar, if the fire's not there, Oh, we'll have a grand old spree." So we all went down with good old Brown And the booze we could not miss We hadn't been there ten minutes or more 'Til we were quite like this ---- CHORUS |-----------------------------------------------------| | Aaaaaaaaaaand... | | There was Brown, upside down, | | A moppin' up the whiskey on the floor | | "Booze, booze!", the fireman cried | | as they come a-knockin' at the door. (thump thump) | | "Oh, don't let 'em in 'til it's all mopped up." | | Somebody shouted "MacIntyre!" (shout "Macintyre") | | And we all got blue-blind, paralytic drunk, | | When the Old Dun Cow caught fire. | |-----------------------------------------------------| Then Smith run over to the portwine tub And gave it a few hard knocks (Thump thump) Started takin' off his pantaloons, likewise his shoes and socks. "Hold on," says Brown, "That ain't allowed. You can't do that there here. Don't go washin' your trotters in the portwine tub When we got Guinness's beer!" CHORUS And then there came a mighty crash, Half the bloody roof caved in. We was drowned in the firemen's hose, Though we were almost .... happy. So we got some tacks and old wet sacks, And we tacked ourselves inside. And we sat there getting bleary-eyed drunk When the Old Dun Cow caught fire. Page 78 SONG Song of the Shield Wall Words: Malkin Grey Music: Peregryn Wyndryder Hasten, oh, sea steed, over the swan road, Foamy-necked ships o'er the froth of the sea! Hengest has called us from Gotland and Frisia To Vortigern's country, his army to be. We'll take our pay there in sweeter than silver, We'll take our plunder in richer than gold, For Hengest has promised us land for our fighting, Land for the sons of the Saxons to hold! Hasten, oh, fyrds-men, down to the river, Dragon-necked ships on the in-coming tide! The linden wood shield and the old spear of ash wood Are needed again at the cold waterside. Draw up the shield wall, oh, shoulder companions; Later whenever our story is told, They'll say that we died guarding what we call dearest, Land for the sons of the Saxons to hold! Hasten, oh, house-carls, north to the Danelaw, Harald Hardrada's come over the sea! His longships he's laden with berserks from Norway To claim Canute's crown and our master to be! Bitter he'll find here the bite of our spearpoints, Hard ruling Northmen too proud to die old. We'll grant him six feet- plus as much as he's taller -- Of land that the sons of the Saxons will hold! Hasten on Southwards, strong son of Godwin, Triumph is sweet and your men have fought hard. But William the Bastard has landed at Pevensey, Burning the land you have promised to guard. Draw up the spears on the hilltop at Hastings, Fight till the sun drops and evening grows cold, And die with the last of your Saxons around you, Holding the land you were given to hold! (Repeat First Verse) Page 79 FILK Local S.C.A. To the tune of "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen" Arrest these merry gentles, nay, it would be so unkind, If you'll but wait a moment, sir, we will relieve your mind. We are not escaped lunatics, so kindly us unbind, For we are your local S C A, SCA, For we are your local S C A. These men aren't wearing dresses, sir, Those are not pantyhose. No, those are tights and tunics, sir, They are medieval clothes. And men were really macho then, As everybody knows, So please do not look upon us that way, that way. For we are your local S C A. We recreate past ages, sir, And that is all we do. Please give our swords and knives to us We'd like our axes, too. Return us all our weapons, sir, The act you will not rue, For we mostly use them for display, display. For we are your local S C A. We really are not dangerous Although we like to fight. We do it on a tourney field, You see, so it's all right. And we wear lots of armour, too, Like any noble knight, And use our wooden sticks to whale away, whale away, For we are your local S C A. ( continued ) Page 80 FILK Local S.C.A. ( continued ) Oh, we pavanne in public, sir, The horse bransle do, also. Full many a fine feast attend And to a revel go. And all that night we sing and drink, For free the mead doth flow, Then drive four hundred miles the next day, the next day. For we are your local S C A. We have a King and Prince who do Our loyalty command This is Three Rivers Barony, The finest in the land. And we are on our way to court, But not the one you planned. Oh, please let us go upon our way, our way. For we are your local S C A. Arrest these merry gentles, nay, Discretion you should use. For we are lords and ladies, sir, So how can you refuse. I say, that is a lady, sir, You should not her abuse. It is not genteel to act this way, this way, And lock up your local S C A. Page 81 Coeur de Boeuf Challenge Song. FILK Oh, the Midrealm Chivalry get no tail, Oh, the Midrealm Chivalry get no tail, To alleviate the yen, They go out with Viking men, Oh, the Midrealm Chivalry get no tail. Oh, the Vikings have no women on their ships, Oh, the Vikings have no women on their ships, To keep all their parts in use, They resort to self abuse, Oh, the Vikings have no women on their ships. If the Masters of the Midrealm had their wish, Well, they would never go with women, they'd just fish. Well, they are not women haters, But they all are master baiters, And the masters of the midrealm smell like fish. Oh, the fighters of the Midrealm get no tail, Oh, the fighters of the Midrealm get no tail, After melee with the guys, They can hardly get a rise, Oh, the fighters of the Midrealm get no tail. Oh, the marshals of the Midrealm get no tail, Oh, the marshals of the Midrealm get no tail, Oh, it's not that they are cold, But they're always yelling "HOLD!", Oh, the marshals of the Midrealm get no tail. Oh, the artists of the Midrealm get no tail, Oh, the artists of the Midrealm get no tail, It's not that they're so grand, But their talents in their hands, Oh, the artists of the Midrealm get no tail. Oh, the heralds of the Midrealm get no tail, Oh, the heralds of the Midrealm get no tail, For when e're they need a laugh, All they do is raise their staff, Oh, the heralds of the Midrealm get no tail. Oh, the elves of the Midrealm get no tail, Oh, the elves of the Midrealm get no tail, When they do it in the trees, They mean knotholes if you please, Oh, the elves of the Midrealm get no tail. Well, the Mongols, but, of course, they get tail, Well, the Mongols, but, of course, they get tail, Oh, the Mongols, but, of course, Would rather get it from a horse, And the horses of the Mongols have no tails. Page 82 SONG Wild Mountain Thyme NOTE: My source lists this as Traditional Scottish. Another source has very similar wording, and credits as Traditional Ireland/England. "Folk Songs of England and Ireland" claims this as being written in recent times by Frank McPeake of Belfast, perhaps being inspired by "The Queen Among The Heather". Oh, the summertime is comin', And the trees are sweetly blooming, Where the wild mountain thyme Grows around the blooming heather CHORUS |----------------------------------------------------------| | Will ye go, lassie, will ye go? | | And we'll all go together to pick wild mountain thyme | | All around the blooming heather. | | Will ye go, lassie, will ye go? | |----------------------------------------------------------| I will build my love a bower By yon pure crystal fountain And around it I will pile All the flowers of the mountain. CHORUS If my true love e'er should leave me I would surely find another Where the wild mountain thyme Grows around the blooming heather. CHORUS Oh, the autumn-time is comin', And the leaves are gently falling, Where the wild mountain thyme Grows around the blooming heather CHORUS Page 83 SONG Crazy Man Michael Author Unknown Deep in the fir woods, not along the shore, Crazy man Michael went walkin' He met with a raven with eyes black as coal, Shortly the two fell to talkin' "Your future, your future, I'll tell unto you. Your future you often have asked me. Your true love will die by your own right hand And crazy man Michael will cursed be." Michael he ranted, and Michael he raved And beat the four winds with his fists, oh. He laughed and he cried, he cursed and he swore, For his mad mind had trapped him with a kiss, oh. "You speak with an evil, you speak with a hate. You speak for the devil that haunts me, For is she not the fairest in all this broad land? Your sorcerous words are to taunt me." He drew out a dagger of fire and steel And struck down the raven through the heart, oh. The bird fluttered long, and the sky it did slip And the cold earth did wonder and start, oh. "Oh, where is the raven that I struck down dead That lately did lie on the ground, oh? For I see my true love with a wound all so red Where her lover's heart it did pound, oh!" Crazy man Michael wanders and looks And speaks to the night and the day, oh. But his eyes they are sane, and his speech it is plain, Though he longs to be far away, oh. Michael, he whispers the simplest of tunes, And begs the wild winds for their pardon, For his true love has flown into every flower grove And Michael must be keeper of the garden. Page 84 SONG Carlough Traditional Irish Bruce McTaggart, hold your face Brooding over the old disgrace That black FitzWilliam's stormed yer place, Drove you to the fens! Grey said, "Vicar, leave assured. Soon the fire-byrne we'll secure." Until he met at Glen Malure With Feach MacHugh O'Burne! CHORUS |---------------------------------------| | Curse and swear, Lord Kildare! | | Feach will do as Feach will dare! | | Now, FitzWilliam have a care! | | Fallen is your star, low! | | Up with halberd! Out with sword! | | On we go, for by the Lord | | Feach MacHugh has given the word: | | "Follow me up to Carlough!" | |---------------------------------------| See the swords at Glen Amough: They're flashin' over the English Pale! See all the children of the Gael Beneath O'Burne's banner! Rooster of a fightin' stock, Would you let a Saxon cock Crow out upon an Irish rock? Fly up and teach him manners! CHORUS From Tassangart to Clamore There flows a stream of Saxon gore We're great as Rory Og O'Mor At sendin' the lions to Hades! White is sick, Grey is fled, Now for black FitzWilliams head! We'll send it over drippin' red To Queen 'Liza and her ladies! CHORUS Page 85 SONG Damien's Lament By Brendan O Corraidhe Tune: "If I Was A Blackbird" I am a young squire, my story is sad Though once I was carefree, and a brave fighting lad. I courted the lassies by night and by day, But now I shall leave them, no longer to play. CHORUS |----------------------------------------------------| | Oh, the evils of women are a bane to a man | | They'll cheat and deceive you whenever they can | | And if you should trust them | | They will do what they may. | | So, it's vows of the chaste life | | I'm taking today. | |----------------------------------------------------| I entered Crown Tourney, my fortune to seek And I carried the favor of a lass gay and meek. But I was distracted near the close of the day By two winsome young damsels as I knelt me down to pray. CHORUS She sat down beside me, lay my head in her lap. So, I thought it no harm for to take a small nap. Ah, but she and her sister were so greatly to blame For they plotted my downfall, my disgrace, and my shame. CHORUS And when I awakened, I knew a great dread For these ladies had stolen my squire's belt so red. And straightway to my master, they did not delay, And the things that they told him, the things they did say. CHORUS For my small indiscretion I have paid a great price. So, take heed, you young lovers and attend my advice: Be you Vikings, or Normans, or Cavaliers, or Celts; If you dally with ladies, keep a hold on your belts! CHORUS SONG The Rattlin' Bog Traditional English according to some sources. Traditional Irish according to others. Again, there are several versions of this song. This is the version that was printed in Brendan's Songbook. CHORUS |------------------------------------------------------------| | Hey, ho, the rattlin' bog, the bog down in the valley, oh! | | Hey, ho, the rattlin' bog, the bog down in the valley, oh! | |------------------------------------------------------------| Now in this bog there was a TREE, A rare TREE, a rattlin' TREE. Tree in the bog In the bog down in the valley, oh! CHORUS Now on this tree there was a LIMB, A rare LIMB, a rattlin' LIMB. Limb on the tree On the tree in the bog In the bog down in the valley, oh! CHORUS Now on this limb there was a BRANCH, A rare BRANCH, a rattlin' BRANCH. Branch on the limb On the limb on the tree On the tree in the bog In the bog down in the valley, oh! CHORUS Continue with... And on this branch there was a twig... And on this twig there was a leaf... And on this leaf there was a bug... And on this bug there was a hair... Page 87 FILK Early Mournin' Dew By: Mary Taran of Glastonbury Tune: "Leaving on a Jet Plane" Oh, your shield is hacked from many a blow, I'm standing here, though you don't know, I hate to wake you up to see you die; But the shieldwall is breaking, it's battered and torn, The herald's calling, he's blowing his horn, Already I am mourning for your hide. CHORUS |----------------------------------------------| | (So) wake up and fight for me, | | Tell me that you'll die for me, | | Hurry and get armoured up and go; | | You'll go out there and get slain | | -- Don't know if you will fight again -- | | (Oh) my Lord, you have to go. | |----------------------------------------------| There's so many times they've knocked you down, So many times you've lost a round, I tell you now: they don't mean a thing; Every battered helm is worn by you, Every mace they swing, they swing at you, If you come back, I'll mend your chain mail rings. CHORUS Now the time has come to wake you, One more time must I shake you, You soon will be deep within the fray; Think about the days to come, While you go out there all alone, About the time I won't have to say: CHORUS Page 88 SONG Calling On Song Good people, pray heed our petition Your attention we beg and we crave And if you are inclined for to listen An abundance of pastime we'll have We are come to relate many stories Concerning our forefather's times And we trust they will drive out your worries Of this we are all in one mind Many tales of the poor and the gentry Of labor and love will arise There are no finer songs in this country In Scotland and Ireland likewise There's one thing more needing mention The dances we've danced all in fun So now that you've heard our intention We'll play on the beat of the drum Page 89 SONG Itches In Me Britches I was born of country parents One day when I was young. That's how the country dialect Became me native tongue. That I was a pretty babe Me mother she would vow. The girls all ran to kiss me. Well, I wish they'd do it now CHORUS Oh, I wish they'd do it now. Oh, I wish they'd do it now. I've got itches in me britches And I wish they'd do it now. Well, when I was only six months old The girls would handle me. They clutched me to their bosoms And they bounced me on their knee. They would rock me in the cradle And if I made a row They'd tickle me, they'd cuddle me I wish they'd do it now. CHORUS At sixteen months as fine a lad As ever could be seen. The girls all liked to follow me Right down to the green. They would make a chain of buttercups And drop it on me brow. Then they'd roll me in the clover. Well, I wish they'd do it now. CHORUS Well, the eastern girls would call for me To swim when it was mild. Down to the river we would go And splash about a while. They would throw the water over me And duck me like a cow. Then they'd rub me nice all over. Well, I wish they'd do it now. CHORUS Well, it's awful lonely for a lad To lead a single life. I think I'll go to the dance tonight And find meself a wife. Oh, I've got six bundle pigs Likewise one big fat sow. There'll be plenty of love and bacon For the girl who'll have me now For the girl who'll have me now. For the girl who'll have me now. There'll be plenty of love and bacon For the girl who'll have me now. Page 90 SONG Maids In Trades Come all of ye trades and ye tradesmen And let ye be wise that are fools But remember each day That your trade would decay If a maid didn't look to your tools. The blacksmith, the smokey old blacksmith He's known as a jolly old fellow But his iron would burn old And his fire would grow cold If a maid didn't blow up the bellows. And then there's the candlestick maker He works up the tallow so quick But his craft would be marred And the works not get hard If a maid didn't hold up the wick The ploughman, the jolly old ploughman He follows the plow in the silt But it's ne'er a clod turned If a maid hadn't learned him To drive the blade up to the hilt The brewer, the jolly old brewer He maketh a very fine ale But his brew would be waste If there's no maid to taste And make sure that it doesn't grow stale So come all of ye journeymen, craftsmen And all who are apprenticed to trade For it's never a screw Or a nut would be turned If it weren't for the help of a maid! Page 91 SONG Dear Companion I once did have a dear companion Indeed I thought his love my own Until some black-eyed girl betrayed me Now he cares no more for me. Go and leave me if you wish to That will never trouble me For in your heart you love another In my grave I'd rather be. Last night you were so sweetly sleeping Dreaming in some soft repose While I a poor girl broken hearted Was listening to the wind that blows. Go and leave me if you wish to Far from this lonely world I'll flee For in your heart you love another In my grave I'd rather be. Page 92 SONG The Fairy's Love Song CHORUS |------------------------------------| | Why should I sit and sigh | | Pulling bracken, pulling bracken | | Why should I sit and sigh | | On a hillside dreary? | |------------------------------------| When I see the plover rising Or the curlew wheeling Then I know my mortal lover Back to me is stealing. CHORUS Ah, but there is something wanting Oh, but I am weary Come my blithe and bonny laddie O'er the knoll to cheer me CHORUS Page 93 SONG Lizzie Lindsey CHORUS |-------------------------------------------------| | Will you gang to the hielands, Lizzie Lindsey? | | Will you gang to the hielands wi' me | | Will you gang to the hielands, Lizzie Lindsey? | | My bride and darlin' tae be? | |-------------------------------------------------| Tae gang tae the hielands wi' you, Sir I fear that never may me For I ken no the land that you live in Nor ken I the lad I'm gang wi' CHORUS Oh, Lizzie lass, you mun ken little If you say that you do not ken me For my name it is Lord Robert McDonald (*) A chieftan of high degree CHORUS She's kilted up her skirts of green satin She's kilted them over her knee And she's off with Lord Robert McDonald His bride and his darlin' tae be CHORUS (*) My source for this had a footnote saying that the original text has Ronald McDonald.

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